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Discussion Starter #1
I recently had my break pads replaced (<6 months) and the rotors treated. Recently, I've been experiencing some vibration upon breaking, so I took my CR-V into who I think is a reputable mechanic. He pulled the wheels off and showed me how the rotors are glazed and warped. "OK, no problem, time to replace them." He told me too however, that the old rotors affected the break pads in a way that they won't be able to be used with the new rotors. He states that they HAVE to be replaced with the rotors, even though they are almost new. The whole thing is going to cost ~$750, so I wanted to get a second opinion before I authorized the service. Anyone know breaks who can tell me if this sounds accurate? Thanks for the help!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate the feedback and empathy, but that doesn't do much in answering my question about whether break pads will always need to be replaced when rotors are replaced, regardless of wear.
 

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Yes they do need to be replaced.

If you look at new pads you can scratch the surface with your fingernail, on the old glazed ones you have to use some force on a screwdriver to do any noticeable scratching. The surface of both the pads and the rotors "heat harden" and mate to each other after a few braking cycles. That is why rotors should be turned if you are not replacing them when installing new pads. Besides, brake pads aren't that expensive, it's the labor that gets you.

The price sounds within range for 4 wheels, if you're only doing 2 it sounds high to me.
 

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As a mechanic, yeap.

Not sure what you mean by treating the rotors. Guessing you meant turned the rotors to remove warping.

The reasons as to why the problem happened are:

Turning the rotors, never a good idea these days.

Wheels not properly torqued with a torque wrench

Hard braking right after install (what caused glazing). There is actually a proper procedure to bed in new/turned brake rotors. If its not done then brakes overheat, glaze and warp.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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Yeah, a shop ALWAYS wants to replace rotors. That takes less of their time than measuring thickness, and having the rotors turned if not too thin. BUT cheap, 'white-box' rotors can warp easily too. (Yes, these days it costs almost as much to 'turn' a rotor as buy new)

The brand of pad can cause vibrations too, especially if they are cheap/inexpensive. You can minimize pad redeposits by NOT stopping totally after hard braking. (Leave a car-length between you and the car ahead, then creep up, at the end of a freeway exit ramp for example.)

Read this: http://www.stoptech.com/technical-support/technical-white-papers/-warped-brake-disc-and-other-myths


++++++++++


Personally, I don't replace the rotors unless I'm getting a stopping vibration. In my locale, that is usually from the 'rusty ridge' caused by road salt. I replaced our V's rotors because of that, at 130K miles...and our '07 Fit still has factory rotors at 150K miles (two sets of pads) with no issues. (I usually use factory pads purchased from the online dealers.)

Do I need to say YMMV? :p
 

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Cleaning the glaze off the rotors and then re-seating your fairly new pads on them would probably work just fine, if you are doing your own work.
Some do reuse fairly new pads with new rotors and have good luck.
Either way, look up on how to break in 'new' pads etc , as this can make a world of difference on braking efficiency and smoothness.
Many times when someone says their rotors are 'warped', it is usually only that the rotor are glazed with old brake pad material and not warped at all.

Buffalo4
 

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Can you advise how the glaze is cleaned off of the rotors ?? Is it mechanically done like turning ???
 

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Can you advise how the glaze is cleaned off of the rotors ?? Is it mechanically done like turning ???
I'm a 70 year old cheapskate that has been working on brakes on my cars and used cars since I was 15. I have always removed the glaze from brake drums, brake rotors, brake pads and brake shoes with rough (80 grit) sandpaper. The only time we turned or replaced rotors is when they were badly grooved or the pedal pulsated. You sand by hand in the direction the drum or rotor turns.
 

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Removing the glaze off of the rotors can be done using 150 - 220 grit sandpaper. The idea is to ruff up the surface to allow new pads to set. Some people do it others don't
 

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I'm a 70 year old cheapskate that has been working on brakes on my cars and used cars since I was 15. I have always removed the glaze from brake drums, brake rotors, brake pads and brake shoes with rough (80 grit) sandpaper. The only time we turned or replaced rotors is when they were badly grooved or the pedal pulsated. You sand by hand in the direction the drum or rotor turns.
Same here.
 

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I'm a 70 year old cheapskate that has been working on brakes on my cars and used cars since I was 15. I have always removed the glaze from brake drums, brake rotors, brake pads and brake shoes with rough (80 grit) sandpaper. The only time we turned or replaced rotors is when they were badly grooved or the pedal pulsated. You sand by hand in the direction the drum or rotor turns.
All true, but today's rotors are thinner, depending on the car. Best to check by the numbers, machine, measure. If it can't make it for the life of the pads, best to replace.
 
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