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Hi all, I am planning to buy a used 2007 Honda CR-V EX Sport Utility 4D car with 195k miles on it and I wanted to seek your suggestion. The car is well-maintained by the owner who owned the vehicle for the last 8 years and she provides me with relevant paperwork. Carfax shows no accident but a "damage" and the owner explained it as deer hitting the right back side of the car and leaving a baseball size dent. She later took care of it and it was reported as damage to the carfax.

Other than that, the car seems very clear, both inside and outside, and the lady owning the vehicle is a professional who I felt like I can trust(although obviously I am not solely relying on interpersonal trust). She took care of AC long ago and changed the starter and battery recently. She asked for $4300 and we agreed to $3800.

Would you suggest me to get into such a deal? I am somewhat aware of the potential problems of high mileage cars but this car seems to be well maintained and the price seemed good to me. Plus, CR-V is a good car for my type of person who likes going camping, fishing etc. However, I am a grad student and don't have too much money to spend on a second car if this one turns out bad. I would be very grateful for your suggestions.

Thanks!
 

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Welcome

For historical problems that "may" show themselves, roll the dice.... Even roll the dice on a brand new vehicle purchase. Ouch!

Before buying, recommend taking the vehicle to "your" trusted mechanic and ask them for an end-end inspection. It will cost you a few buck (out of your pocket) but in the end, you are getting a professional eyes looking at it. Another check is to compare your purchase price to similar "for sale" CRVs in your area. Same model, same year and same high miles. Compare price to see if your agreed purchase price is good - compared to average selling price (for your unique area).

If all looks good (from mechanical inspection and buying price view), then I say "buy it". Especially if you have "current" limited dollars. Drive it for a few years and after you get your high paying future job, then decide to keep it or trade in. If wondering, I bought an older age vehicle 1st time and was able to squeeze another 8 more years out of it. It was a good decision many years ago. Hopefully, this specific vehicle does the same for you...

Hope this helps...
 

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If it was any other car I'd be leery but this gen CR-V is pretty near bulletproof. As long as routine maintenance was performed at the proper intervals then you should be able to drive this car for another 3-4 years with no major problems.

As another poster stated - spend a $100 and have it checked by a competent mechanic just to be sure.

We have an 08 with 135,000 miles on it and it runs great, no major problems in the 11 years we've owned it. I expect to drive it for another 2-3 years and buy a new one when Honda works out the problems with the 1.5t engine in the current CR-V's.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for all your suggestions. I will be meeting with the owner tomorrow and have the car checked by a mechanic as you suggested. Hope this works out well for me. Thank you again!
 

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A reminder, maintenance is much more than engine oil changes.

Hopefully you will get documentation of ATF and brake fluid replacements as well as filters. Anything not done should be performed by you (if you buy the car) and purchase allowance given.
 

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I've replaced so many major things on both of our '09s that I can't recommend this generation to anyone with a clear conscience. (In the past year and a half--two A/C compressors, two starters, full sets of struts, and numerous small things...and the list keeps growing.) My '97 never had the issues these '09s have had. I just hope the Acura I'll be upgrading to in a year or two doesn't have worse problems (I want a good, honest V6). I'd get a 3rd gen Pilot, but the upper models have that horrible ZF transmission that has poor shift quality.
 

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I've replaced so many major things on both of our '09s that I can't recommend this generation to anyone with a clear conscience. (In the past year and a half--two A/C compressors, two starters, full sets of struts, and numerous small things...and the list keeps growing.) My '97 never had the issues these '09s have had. I just hope the Acura I'll be upgrading to in a year or two doesn't have worse problems (I want a good, honest V6). I'd get a 3rd gen Pilot, but the upper models have that horrible ZF transmission that has poor shift quality.
Thing is any car isn't going to be any better these days. The more major parts you list aren't made by Honda, made under contracts. AC compressors have been a problem for every brand that has then located down low because of lack of air flow (plastic shields). This also is when they started producing the CRV in the US. Gen 2 has AC compressor issue as well.

I personally wouldn't condemn the generation for those things as it's still far better track record than many other brands . Not even Toyota has a great track record, their 4cyl engines have the head bolts come loose from the block (strips the threads) just from driving from early 2000s on up to around 2010-2012.

If the engine and transmission are sound and a vehicle isn't prone to rusting out/falling apart I would say your in pretty good shape.

FYI an Acura is nothing more than a Honda with tweaks. Probably want to research as I am willing to bet they aren't doing any better/worse than their Honda branded counterparts.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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FYI an Acura is nothing more than a Honda with tweaks. Probably want to research as I am willing to bet they aren't doing any better/worse than their Honda branded counterparts.
My main reason to switch to Acura is to get a V6 in a smaller SUV (the RDX) if I decide to stick to the basic size of a CR-V. And the last generation of the RDX is the last one to have a V6, as the current generation has a turbo 2.0L (and let's just say Honda has a very spotty record with turbos, depending on the model). I would hope the MDX (which I prefer over the Pilot) keeps the V6 in future generations, but I am not betting on it.

I really don't like Toyota myself, but I'm looking at a 4-Runner to replace my '09, since it offers a V6 and the low gearing I want for the off-road driving that I can't do with a CR-V. And actually, if the 2nd gen Pilot wasn't so ugly, I would have bought that instead of my '09...
 

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A two-row V6 SUV describes the new Honda Passport. :banana:
 

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A V6 would help but it's still not 4L/4H gearing, and good luck finding lift kits. Nothing crazy, but an extra inch or two underneath would help. I've had to turn around on a few questionable passes because of it, and missed out on some nice drives.

I do like the Passport but it's too expensive when new, and I think the upper models still have that crap ZF transmission. I can afford one in five or six years, after someone else takes the hit on depreciation. ;) That's about where I find the sweet spot in what I buy--mileage isn't too crazy high, condition is still nice, and the price is knocked down to where it won't break the bank. The Acuras also do not hold their value--in my searches, they deflate down to where a Honda should be after several years' time. In other words, I can often get an MDX for not much more than a Pilot of the same year. (The price disparity is a lot less, in other words.)

So yeah, I got this covered. :D
 

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I purchased a 2010 CRV-EXL w/110K from a dealer last year. My rule of thumb when purchasing used vehicles is as follows:
1. Make sure the car has never been in an accident. EZ way to check is to make sure factory bar codes w/ VIN #'s are on the hood, front quarter panels, doors, and the trunk.
Take the vehicle to at least 2 body shops and ask the owner to inspect the car. They can usually spot through a quick visual inspection if the car has been hit. IMHO once a
car is hit, it's NEVER the same.
2. Try to get a service history of the car from the owner. An owner who takes meticulous care of a car will have all service receipts including the bill of sale & original sticker.
If the car is purchased from a dealer, ask for a Carfax. I use it as a guide and not a bible. Also call Honda North America and provide them with the VIN #. They can tell you
what dealer the car was purchased from. Call the dealer and try to get as much information from the service department as you can.

3. Take the car to a certified mechanic (not a local Honda Dealer) and pay to have the car inspected from bumper to bumper. Have the mechanic put the car on a lift.
If it gets a clean bill of health, that's about all you can do.

4. Finally you have to go with your gut. When in doubt leave it out. Good luck.

I've had my CRV for a year. Overall it has been fine except for 2 issues. The first was an A/C Compressor that froze and a Catalytic Converter that went south. Other than that
the car has performed flawlessly. I've owned 4 Hondas in my lifetime and have gotten over 275K on each.
 

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Not sure on the CR-V but usually a major service is required at 200,000 miles. This will be the timing belt and water pump. Kind of expensive so budget that in to your offer.
 

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Actually, 2002 & up all have timing chains that do not require replacement, and should be good for the life of the car. However, the water pump might still need replacing every 100k miles perhaps. My '01 CR-V (1st gen) has a belt. Have to change the belt & water pump (usually Honda sells it together as a kit) every 100k. But my 2016 V has the chain, and so does the 2007. To the OP: But the fluids should definitely all be checked before buying any vehicle. Check fluid levels...If low, or if fluids look dirty, or if transmission fluid smells burnt, I'd ask to see receipts for the last time that particular fluid was replaced. (I'd ask for all service receipts anyway, for sure! And take your time looking them over. Check mileage & dates on each receipt to make sure everything is on the up & up in chronological order.) If oil was changed less than 3k miles or 3 months ago, & the level is lower than the full mark, I'd be leery. Could be burning oil, or might have a leak. If it's burning oil, which is really rare for these engines unless someone really neglected to change the oil as scheduled, do not buy it! If the tranny fluid has less than 30k miles on it & the level is low, looks brownish, or smells burnt, stay away! Honda automatics have a spotty record, and you want to change fluid at least every 30k. Tranny fluid should look pinkish/red. If it's brownish, run away! Also, ask if the rear differential fluid has be changed according to the maintenance schedule, and ask to see receipts for that as well. Should be changed every 15k to 30k miles. If not, you might be looking at rear differential failure not too far in the future. And be sure to check if coolant was ever flushed. I know my '01 V requires coolant flush 1st at 120k, then every 60k thereafter. Not sure about the '07's. I also vote for a good, qualified mechanic to give the entire vehicle a thorough inspection. Check suspension parts, all fluids, compression test the cylinders (make sure this is done! It will tell you overall what condition the engine is in), check hoses, belts, brakes, look for any leaks, check for pending computer codes, condition of tires, test drive it, etc... And be sure to take it on a highway once & bring it up to speed limit & listen for any unusual sounds, like gear whining sounds, wheel bearing noises, rattles over bumps big/small, steering wobble/vibration, etc... Also make sure all tires match (brand, model, size). Best of luck, and I hope it all works out for you!
 

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I have to take exception with your #1 point.

There's too many variables involved to just dismiss a car that's been in an accident. It would all depend on the severity. Getting hit in the fender and having the fender replaced would not automatically disqualify a vehicle.
My Acura was hit causing 12k worth of damage. It was repaired by a certified Acura body shop and the repairs were flawless. I drove the car for another 8 years with no problems.
Maybe in the old days that would be true but not today.
 
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