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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For about the past six months, the rear passenger window is moooovvvving reaaaaaally slow on both down and up. This is also the window the dog sticks her head out and probably gets left down accidentally more than the others. I was thinking about taking off the inside door panel to see if it is gunked up with hair, or maybe the mechanism got a little rusty. Does this sound like a reasonable idea, or should I take it to someone? I'm fine either way, but I'd like to have an idea of the problem before I enlist a mechanic. Thanks!
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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12,154 Posts
Before you rip open the door panel, I'd clean out the 'tracks' that the window rides in with rubbing alcohol, on a lint free cloth. THEN apply a dry lubricant (used for sliding house windows, look in Lowes, Home Depot, or similar). Wet lubes such as silicone sprays attract dirt and might make it worse in the long run.

Most window motors & regulators are made of plastic these days, so rust isn't a factor.
 

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I've had slow windows on Hondas before, and it's usually the window actuator that is going bad. The actuator contains a motor and a small gearbox which pulls on the cables to raise and lower the window. I would first check to see if the window tracks are clean, and make certain nothing is binding. But if those look OK, then your actuator might need replacement. The inside of the gearbox gets corroded.
 

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2008 Honda CR-V EX-L FWD
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99 Posts
I suggest use silicon paste to lubricate the tracks, 3M silicone paste comes to mind, its safer for rubber track. Dry lubricant, from my experiences work for short term (<2 month) before you have to reapply. When checking the tracks, also check the lowered track as well (inside the door), not just the upper track. Often its the lowered portion that maybe bent/warp or the rubber seizing up that caused the slow operation. If all else failed, replace the actuator, as suggested above.
 
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