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Thought it was be a simple process to remove the rear trailing arm and replace the bushings. Got all the bolts removed but one. Head snapped right off. Guess Ill be pulling the whole rear assembly and cutting and drilling out the remainder.



i had to bend the small plate that was blocking the back of the bolt...i started to use a dremel on the locking nut. Looks like Ill need to remove the brake plate and use a 3 in cut off wheel on the bolt end. Then ill try popping out the rest. Not sure if the remaining threads will keep it from exiting.

 

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yeah, i was not a happy camper - i used very choice words. i guess that locking nut on the back side was rusted and had seized the bolt. i just hope i can punch it out after cutting off the back end of that bolt.
 

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i don't think i backed the bolt out at all - so i would say all of the bolt is still left. I was able to find a picture of the trailing arm and bolt on ebay - looks like if i grind off or cut off the entire back end of the bolt and the built in locking nut it should be enough to free it with a good punch from a thin punch tool. Then Ill replace the bolt and use a new locking type nut. I hope.
 

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problem is that the brake cover is in the way of a cut off tool. Once thats off i can get a 3 in cut off wheel back there to remove the back side of the bolt.
 

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Advise, dont EVER mess with bolts like that without a decent torch. Like doing exhaust. Acetylene torch or any place that carries welding supplies with have a small canister oxy/map torch set up. Similar but cant actually cut metal. Meant for heating and brazing. Takes longer than a full acetylene torch set up but still better than the alternative.

Save yourself A LOT of headache and time. Heat up rusted nuts/bolts. Penetrating oil (PB blaster is the best) may or may not help and takes a lot of time to do any good.

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Here is your problem. It isn't the bolt seized in the nut. Its the bolt seized in the metal collar in that bushing. I can tell you know that it probably wont come out of the bushing. You should still be able to press the old bushing out with the bolt still in it, just cut the nut off and enough of the bolt to get it out. Replaced the bolt and a new, preferably hardened nut. I like to put some anti seize in the bushing collars so the bolts don't rust up in case I have to take it off later down the road.
 

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I soaked it in PB blaster for about an hour - went at it with a cheap harbor fright electric impact gun - spent about 20 min at that then used a breaker bar and snapped it. I see why its called a breaker bar. lol
 

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Thanks BDud - I was afraid that the bolt was seized to the collar - I'm about to take off from work and start chopping off the tail end of that bolt. I'll report back once I get somewhere. What a pain.
 

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^^ X2 on the use of heat...But with suspension bits, you might not want to 'melt' the rubber bushings on the first attempt. :Darn:





Next time, try this method:

Frozen Bolts, Candle Wax, and a Propane Torch

https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=540388
Ive never gotten the candle wax method to work.

Definitely cases where you have to be careful not to melt or burn other things but like in this case, he said he was changing the bushings.

Torch does help for getting it un-seazed from the collars too but the amount of heat to do that is what Carbuff was pointing out. Would trash the bushing.

Good luck wrestling that out, been in your shoes many times, its tough but youll get it.

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Omg, I remember all to well restoring my 68 442. It had so many 40 year old seized bolts, nuts and studs, I seriously contemplated rolling it out of the garage and setting it on fire.
 

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Omg, I remember all to well restoring my 68 442. It had so many 40 year old seized bolts, nuts and studs, I seriously contemplated rolling it out of the garage and setting it on fire.
Ugh is right.. I need some bushings replaced but not something I would try myself. Good tips, though, for those who would. I'll stick to maybe trying to adjust my own valves... been reading up on it.

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This is a common Honda problem I've run into many times. Now whenever I mess with LCA bolts, I make sure to have a backup bolt.
 

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ive had this problem on other cars, really stupid design having that long boltgthrough a long sleeve and both are steel, they are just asking it to rust and sieze. they should make it out of stainless or at the verrg least grease the hell out of it in assembly.

if you can get an air hammer / chisel on it you might be able to punch it out. its really tough to get these out or loose because the rubber of the bushing absorbs all your impact efforts. as others suggested id concentrate on cutting the bolt close and taking the bushing out with it still inside if you can.

id suggest liberally spreading some marine grease on the new bolt and in the new bushing sleeve before re assembling it.
 

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Made an account here just to share this tip.

I recently picked up a 2001 CR-V as a new daily (Found that Air ride on my 9th gen si is not the most reliable or smoothest ride). After installing my front coilovers with ease, I proceeded to do the rear. Starting with the drivers side, i removed the bolt closest to the center of the car just fine.

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Next, tried to remove the bolt through the shock and the head snapped off. "No problem" I thought, I can just take out the whole shock with the control arm when i take out the two bolts from the top inside the vehicle. Next, i go to unscrew the SAME bolt that OP had issues with and the head snapped clean off.

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What I did next was cut the bolt THROUGH the bushing on both sides to free the control arm. What I was left with was a tiny portion of the bolt stuck into the welded nut. Like OP said, It would be difficult to fit a dremel or small grinder wheel in there, and I didnt feel like removing all the brake components just for this little piece of bolt left.

I took a regular drill bit, and drilled into the remainder of the nut about 1/2 and inch, I then took a small extension to fit in the hole i drilled and have it 4-5 hard smacks with the hammer and the tack weld broke off, freeing the welded nut and remainder of the bolt. I now have a clean mounting point to work with. Ordered new control arms for about 80 bucks, and a set of dorman nuts and bolts for 25 bucks and the remainder of the install will only take a few minutes. Hope this helps somebody.

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Hey all, I inherited a 2000 CR-V with 145k that has been in the family for the previous two owners. To say they neglected it would be an understatement.

I've put a fair amount of effort into bringing her back up to snuff
  • rear diff fluid changed
  • transmission fluid changed
  • rear bearings
  • timing belt
  • valve adjustment
  • new valve cover gasket
  • new plugs and wires
  • new battery and windshield (ugh)
After all that, I finally felt like I wouldn't get stranded on the side of the road. It was time to pay attention to the exhausted shocks and horrid ride quality.

I went with KYBs and decided to reuse the original springs as this seems to be the best option in relation to ride quality from the consensus online.

Without reading, I decided to go after the rear first as it looked easier. Boy, was I wrong.

Started on driver's side, snapped rear shock bolt. Used a sawzall to free the shock from the lower control arm. However, I still couldn't remove the shock because of the angle it had been cut at. I had to remove the LCA to get the shock out. Then grind the welded shock nut off of the LCA. Replacement M10x1.25 nut can be had at Home Depot.
PITA but fairly easy fix.

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Then to the passenger side: I was planning on the shock bolt snapping and it did. In an overconfident move, I went after the outer LCA bolt with a breaker bar. I had soaked all with PB blaster for a few days but I should have wire brushed the threads and worked it back and fourth...the head sheared right off just like streetbikejay.

I went ahead and cut the outer LCA bushing as streetbikejay did and had the welded nut left (with bolt remnants) inside the little box on the lower side of the trailing arm.
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I went after it with a 3/8" metal drill bit, though the LCA, back of the vehicle towards the front. I had had a few drinks so I went a bit overboard, as you can see from the photo. No harm no foul, though. I made it well into the nut.
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I tried to bash it with an extension as hard as I could but the tack welds wouldn't budge. Tip: remove the rear splash guard to get better leverage with a sledge. Also, support the trailing arm with a jack to prevent the other bushings from absorbing all the sledge force.

Ended up regrouping and grabbing a set of cold chisels and punches from harbor freight (#66440) and forming a plan. I ended up using these tools in the following order:
Dremel with cutoff wheel
Dremel with EZ metal cutting wheel (#456)
Oscillating multi-tool with titanium metal blade (harbor freight #64963)
Cold chisel

I'm pretty sure the multitool was the smoking gun. It allowed me to cut a niche large enough to get the cold chisel a divot to bite into. After I could get the cold chisel in there, it was all over.

Finally, I saw the light...there is a hole there!!

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Jumped to the backside and used a punch and voila!

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Finally I had a 'clean' mounting point.

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Anyway, right to putting it back together. My lower control arm's outer bushing was toast because I didn't cut it close enough to the control arm. Instead of pushing a new bushing in I just ordered a new control arm.

If you go to Honda to get the shock bolt you snapped, its $5 and change, however they want ~$15 for the LCA bolts.
You can find a Class 10.9 10-1.25mm bolt for much cheaper than that if you look around. Should be the same based upon torque but use your own judgment.

After I got all 4 installed the ride is improved so much that I almost enjoy hitting bumps.
By the way, the fronts are much easier than the rears so keep your head up.

Thanks a bunch to this forum, I would have been up a creek without your help!

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