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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

First, let me apologize for the length of this post, I like to be thorough... I know there are several threads covering this issue, but none that answer my questions completely (if that’s even possible). Let me start out by saying that I am technical-minded, and pretty handy, mechanically, but have, personally, not done much more for my wife's 2001 CRV (103K miles), than replace the radiator, thermostat, change oil, battery, and other little things. I was completely unaware of the valve adjustment schedule or the valve tightening issue (unfortunately, I’m not very good with keeping up maintenance, and end up repairing after the fact… just being honest).

In the last year, the check engine light came on (misfire code), I checked the obvious (plugs, wires, etc), and reset the light. Months later, it came on again, and I did the same thing. A few months later (keep in mind that the estimate of time before the light came back on, is according to my wife…), it came back, but this time, I had the following codes, and was running a little (really, only a little) rough at idle:

P0300 – Random/Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
P0301 - Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected
P0302 - Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected
P0303 - Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected
P0304 - Cylinder 4 Misfire Detected
P1399 - Manufactures control Ignition system OR Misfire
P1456 - EVAP Emission Control System Leak Detected (Fuel Tank System)

At this point, let me also mention that I have been layed-off for a while, and money is extremely tight, so I troubleshoot by way of “free, cheap, more expensive, and omigod”. Going on previous experience, I checked and gapped the plugs (gaps were HUGE) and checked the plug wires (seemed to be in excellent condition), and examined the gasket/seal of the gas cap (looked good, so I clicked it a few times to make sure it was good and tight). The car seemed to sound a little better, and It was due for a smog test, so I took it in and it failed because I didn’t realize you had to drive it around for a certain amount of time, and/or cycle it a couple of times. It failed only because of the OBD II “Not Ready” indicator. At idle (746 RPM), the Co2 was 14.9, O2 was 0.0, HC was 6 and CO was 0.00, and at 2400 RPM, the Co2 was 14.9, O2 was 0.0, HC was 3 and CO was 0.01.

Unfortunately, the codes returned in a few days. So, I pulled the distributor cap and rotor and took a little emery cloth to the contacts, and put a piece of polyethylene foam between the gas cap and its door (to put pressure on the cap for diagnostic purposes). It sounded a little rougher, but actually seemed to have a little more “power”, but the P1456 code returned almost immediately, so, just outta curiosity, I loosened the cap (no “clicks” at all). I drove it a couple hundred miles, for a few days (putting it through the rigors – extreme driving conditions – No CEL), and took it in for a smog test. The smog measurements came back looking good again (At idle (737 RPM), the Co2 was 15, O2 was 0.0, HC was 12 and CO was 0.00, and at 2605 RPM, the Co2 was 15, O2 was 0.0, HC was 7 and CO was 0.00), but the CEL came back on while he was testing (P0304 & P1399), so it failed.

I went straight to the parts store and purchased new plugs (Bosch platinum) and (Duralast) plug wires, distributor cap, and rotor (geez that little set screw is a b***h!) – $92.00. It didn’t run any better, but again, went another couple hundred miles, for three days, under extreme driving conditions, nothing. The 4th day, I was going to go back to get it smogged, and while it was warming up in the morning, the CEL came back on (P0304 & P1399). Upon doing some research, I came across the posts dealing with the valves tightening up.

When I went to the dealer to get a replacement set screw for the rotor (stupid screw), I asked the parts guy about it, and he asked how the valves sounded, and I said “actually, they’re pretty quiet”, and he said “Yup, sounds like your valves tightened, they should be making a little noise”. That’s when I realized “Hey, now that I think of it, they did used to be louder…”. After installing the new screw (and the new distributor cap o-ring that I found in the bottom of the box), the idle roughness seems to have gone away (maybe I didn’t have it seated right?). After checking the prices at a couple of places, for getting the valves adjusted, I decided I’d figure out how to do it myself. I was pleasantly surprised to see how easy it is, but after reading several more posts and threads, I also see that, in light of my symptoms, it might be too late.

So, considering that:
1.) My light has come on several times, for awhile, with codes ranging from one cylinder misfiring, to random misfires from all of them, for quite a while (currently, still just P0304 & P1399 – P1456 never returned after I loosened the gas cap – go figure).
2.) My car idled a little rough, at first, but sounds better now (hopefully that’s not just in my head)
3.) It never stalled
4.) There was no noticeable decline in speed or power
5.) My Smog emissions are well below maximums, and even well below than averages

Oh, I also found a potential (vacuum?) leak. there was a crack in a tube-like object that connects the throttle body and the air filter housing. It didn't really seem like there was a leak, per se, but there was an crack, and a potential for a leak. I am going to try to attach a pic of it. I attempted a super glue fix, and it seems to have sealed it pretty well, but still...

Crack - Leak.jpg

My ultimate question is… do you think it might be too late? Do you think the valves/seats/seals have receded? Do you think I might have one or more burnt valves? I can see myself easily doing the adjustment, but I don’t think I have the time, equipment, or know-how to do a whole valve job… I made an appt with a professional, for Tuesday, but thinking about doing the adjustment, today, to see what happens, so I’m also thinking maybe I should cancel my appt, for the time being. Is there anything that I’m missing? I believe I have a compression tester (like from the 70s, or 80s), but I guess I have to get some type of adapter to get all the way down into the plug wells, and I have never used a leak-down test. Are these tests easy to do? Are the tools/tester cheap? What if I adjust the valves, it passes smog, and I continue to drive it, and it does (unknowingly) have a burnt/semi-burnt valve? What are the potential/probable issues that could arise?

Thank you SO MUCH for your advice and assistance on this, because I really can’t afford the potential $500-$1500 it could cost me for a professional mechanic to do a whole valve job, but then again, I can’t afford a new car, either.
 

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I don't know if you have done damage or not, but I figure it couldn't hurt to try the adjustment.

Did you see this post here?
http://www.hondasuv.com/members/showthread.php?t=37551

Make sure to use an air compressor blow gun or a shop vac to clean out the spark plug holes before you remove the plugs and try to turn the engine over with the crankshaft. I skipped this step and it wasn't pretty when I tried turning the engine over. Dust flew everywhere.

Make sure you turn the crank counter clockwise so you don't make the timing belt jump.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Shryp,

Yeah, actually I did see that! That's what convinced me that I could do it myself. That thread also discusses a pdf created by a guy named Michael Keefe that is really well documented. The link was bad, but I scoured the internet until I found it (gotta love technology!). I originally tried to get some answers at that site, but after I joined, I never got the email link that allows you to post, and the site admin never responded to my emails... like a ghost town, over there. That's how I ended up here. After I made my post, today, I found this one: http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/14-problems-issues/14035-another-b20-valve-problem.html, which left me less than hopeful... But, on the other hand, it kind of made me feel a little more confident about attempting the the whole thing myself, down to grinding valves, but I'm still a little skeered.. One of the members (jlude90) mentioned a DIY guide for doing all that, that I'm going to try to find (He might even have it or be able to point it out to me). Thanks for the helpful tips! Everything helps at this point!
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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Dave, All you can do at this point is adjust the valves and hope that valve recession isn't too bad.

If you still have problems you could do a compression test to verify.,..
 

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I would really doubt you have a burnt valve. On my old roommates 2000 CRV, I adj the valves around 190k miles (first time they had ever been adjusted) and only a couple were a little tight, so hopefully yours will be fine. Your smog test results don't indicate a burnt valve problem. You should actually be using NGK spark plugs for best performance, even the V-groove copper ones work well in your vehicle and they are cheap.
Don't think the worst. Those early CRVs did have problems with the ignition igniter and the ignition coil (both are inside the distributor) going bad and even the distrbutor itself. I have a link in one of the posts in this forum on how to check those items.
Your CRV may need a valve adjustment, but I really don't think that is the cause of your CEL codes.
While you're checking things, also check your PCV valve and check for vacuum leaks (look up on the internet on how to do that).
Might even try a can of SeaFoam or Chevron Techron for your gasoline. Also use a tank of high quality gas like Shell or Chevron, etc.
IOW, don't jump into thinking the worst. Yes, those valves adj are fairly easy to do.
Do more research on the multiple misfire codes and on the other codes before spending money on replacing or servicing the valves by a shop.
Buffalo4
PS: While troubleshooting,do not crank the engine over with the distributor cap off, a spark plug wire disconnected and not grounded uless you have the dist connector (low voltage wire connection) unplugged or you risk shorting out your ignition coil.
Not to scare you, but you never mentioned if the timing belt had been changed.
PPS: Do a quicker recycle on the OBD (not ready) and take it in for the smog test as soon as you get it to reset. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey Carbuff2,

I will be attempting the adjustment this morning, once I reach a sufficient coffee intake level. Wish me luck! I have a compression tester, but it’s kinda old school, like when spark plugs were towards the outside of the engine, so apparently I’m gonna have to get some sort of adapter for the deeper wells.

Hey Buffalo4,

You have given me hope! The emissions data was really keeping me hopeful, as well. I had no experience that would prove, or disprove, my theory, but I kinda figured the numbers wouldn’t be that good if I had burnt valves, but I didn’t know enough about it to be sure (of course, who would have thought that quiet valves and increased fuel efficiency would be indicators of your valves tightening up – not me, anyway). The dealership told me the same thing about the plugs (after I purchased the platinum set). I have always used the NGK, in the past, but I had gotten the impression that the platinum were better because of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rz3f6STvygY

(at about the 08:17 mark), so I gave ‘em a try. In your opinion, do you think they are just an unnecessary expense, and would be okay to leave in until next change (since I already paid for them), or will they actually cause me problems?
I will look for the link to check the distributor components, because that’s where I was originally leaning, but wasn’t sure how to go about testing them. If you happen to find it first, could you send it my way? Hopefully I haven’t already done damage to the ignition coil (it still starts easily?) because when I originally checked the rotor, changed it, and when I replaced the stupid set screw (that I mangled getting out), I “tapped” the ignition to put the set screw in a position where I could access it.
I had previously found a video (also on you tube)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CPqbaSgcok

on how to check for vacuum leaks using butane or some type of flammable liquid. Liquid seems to be the preferred method, but butane seemed safer (more controlled). Is that the best method, in your opinion? Can you look at the pics I have in my original post and tell me if you think that crack is a potential vaccum leak? At this point, I haven’t done any research on that tube, so I’m not really sure if it’s a vacuum, blower, or what… If you look at the lower, right-hand pic, you can actually see the crack.

I have had the timing belt changed, but I don’t remember exactly when… I had a new A/C put on recently, and I think they might have put one on then (Does the timing belt wrap around the A/C pulley?).

Thanks for all the help!!!
 

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I will try to research your questions further.
While you are troubleshooting, you may even want to change the fuel filter (located on the firewall and easy to get to) if it hasn't ever been done. You can get one for under $25, I believe.
http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/19-maintenance-service/9777-fuel-filter.html
If your CRV is an AWD, don't forget to change the rear diffy fluid with Honda DP2, esp if you hear a rubbing or grating sound when doing a slow tight turn.
If it is an automatic, check out the posts on replacing the ATF fluid. Use Honda DW-1 or Valvoline MaxLife Dex\Merc ATF or another top brand that is OK'd for your vehicle. Many have used the Valvoline ATF and it is pretty cheap at WalMart in the gallon container.
Doing a drain and fill of the ATF is easier than an oil and filter change and doesn't even require you to jack up the CRV.
If you do get your misfire problem figured out in the near future, please post back.
Buffalo4
PS: Interesting vid on that Autolite link you posted. He was talking about the coil-on-plug type systems and I looked on the NGK site and they also recommend their Platinum Plug for the 2001 CRV, but others have had great luck with the V-groove NGK copper plug.
 

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Observations from the cheap seats out WEST:
As stated, your smog numbers are too good to indicate a burned valve(s).
Adjusting the valves isn't hard, but you do have to follow the process and turn the engine in the correct direction or you can/will mess things up. Be sure the engine is dead cold as in left over night cold.
Your vacuum leak crack is upstream of the air meter so all it's doing is letting in unfiltered air.
The serpentine belt is what drives the A/C pulley, not the timing belt.

I enjoy reading such thorough threads, good luck and keep up the good work.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Arghh!!!!!

AHHHH!!!! Moment of panic!!! I just got the valve cover off (it was on there REALLY good!) and there are all kinds of, what looks like, belt shavings all over the inside of the timing belt guard/housing (see pics below). The gears appear to be aligned (also in a pic below), so I don't think it has been slipping, but with all the loose shavings/rubbings, it must be rubbing on something... Or (please, please, please) that's normal... I don't see any scuffed, or rough, areas on the belt. Please let me know what you guys think!
Ugh... It won't let me upload the pics... Is there a quota that you are allowed? They are small (in file size).
 

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Dont even start the engine until you have resolved the where the shavings is coming from. It could be bad tensioner or bearing tensioner going bad. This could be the root cause of you misfire codes. Let us know.
 

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I removed my valve cover to check my valves for the first (only) time this past fall and my belt was clean with no shavings. :(
 

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Those shavings must have been stuck to the valve cover and then fell off while you were removing it (probably tapped on it to loosen it). No idea on what caused it but hopefully some mechanic here will be able to help you out. That could have happened a lot time ago and it might be fine, but at the very least, it needs to be cleaned up. I really don't know how that could cause your slight misfire problem, but I am just guessing.
Hopefully an experienced mechanic will respond.
Buffalo4
 

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Ah, fine filings from the belt.
All is not lost though. First, are they on the inside of the valve cover too?
Do they easily come off the top of the belt?
Take a shop vac and get as much of them out as possible. If you don't have a shop vac a house vac will do just as well. You want to get as much of that stuff out of there as possible without it getting into the 'oily' parts of the valve train.
I notice that they're on the underside of the cogs in the teeth too so I bet they got there when you hit the valve cover to get it off. You did hit it didn't you? The cogs need to be cleaned too. The belt itself looks to be in pretty good condition in your picture. Can you feel the underside where the teeth are? Are they smooth or do they feel rough?
Once you clean up the debris, I'd crank the engine over a little bit with the key, just click it to get it to move a little, not crank. Just too see how the belt looks in another area you can't see right now. How's it look?
This could be left over 'stuff' from an earlier belt but you won't know until you've inspected the whole belt for wear. Mark the part you can see now with chalk or a magic marker and move it around by clicking the key till you've seen it all. Let us know what you see/find.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
sigh...

Hello all,

Ok… After I got over the initial shock of the “Timing Belt Situation”, I went ahead and adjusted the valves. These are how I found them and are listed left to right, from the front of the car:

Cylinder 1
Intake: .005, .005
Exhaust: .005, .005

Cylinder 3
Intake: .005, .005
Exhaust: .009, .009

Cylinder 4
Intake: .005, .005
Exhaust: .000, .007

Cylinder 2
Intake: .006, .006
Exhaust: .007, .006

As you can see, the intakes were all just about spot on (I did adjust #2 a bit), but the exhaust needed a little bit of tweaking (especially #4 – Left). I used the Go/No go method, and found that I didn’t need the fancy tool/vice grip socket. By putting the feeler gauge between the lobe and the rocker arm, and adjusting the screw until there was a little bit of tension when I slid the gauge out, I was able to tighten the lock nut using a regular socket and torque wrench. After tightening each one using that method, I retested with the feeler gauge and found that that the .005” blade slid in easily, while the .006 wouldn’t go at all. It worked the same for the .008/.009 blades.

With absolutely no gap on #4, left exhaust, I can see why that is the cylinder that was throwing up a misfire code first, every single time. Hopefully, it didn’t cause any damage to the valve…

As far as the “belt shavings”, I thought that I had the belt changed, semi-recently, and for some reason, I’m thinking I even had the tensioner replaced for some reason, but I can’t find any receipts (doesn’t really mean anything more than I didn’t put it in the folder, and it’s under a stack of papers somewhere in my office, that I can barely get into, because of all the junk…)., but then again, I think I am starting to come down with a touch of “the seniles”. On top of that, the belt looks brand new. I felt it, and it felt semi-smooth (kinda relative, I think…), definitely no cracks, wear, or pitting, but I think you can get a pretty good idea from the pics I took after cleaning it up (below) (the last pic doesn’t really show anything, but I thought it looked pretty cool…).

Belt 1.jpg
Belt 2.jpg
Belt 3.jpg
Belt 4.jpg

I was really curious as to how the fluff could just be sitting on the belt, when it’s in constant motion, but then I came to the realization, that, as you guys guessed, I had been “tapping” on the cover (ever so gently) for about an hour to get it loose, and the tapping must have knocked all that down. Yes, it was only in the timing belt section of the cover (nothing in the valve/rocker arm area). I also came to the conclusion (possibly out of a desperate need to believe that everything was going to be O-kay!) that the fluff was left over from a previous belt change (although I have a hard time believing that any mechanic would have left that in there after taking all the trouble to replace the belt).

Cover 1.jpg
Cover 2.jpg

I was thinking it could be conceivable that if the tensioner was dragging on the belt, for whatever reason, it could cause enough resistance to slow the crankshaft revolution (as described at around 03:46 of that Autolite video), so that the OBD II sensor picked it up as a misfire (Mr. Buckley is describing how the OBD II system determines that a misfire has occurred), but I would think that I would be able to see some sort of mark on the belt, to produce that much fluff, so I feel pretty confident that the #4 exhaust valve was the source of my misfire…

I would like to do what 20CRVEX13 said, and rotate the belt around so I can verify that the WHOLE belt looks as good as the area that I can see right now, but I’m kinda leery about cranking it over without the plug wires being plugged in, because I already screwed up and “tapped” it a few times (on three separate occasions) to get that distributor rotor set screw to a position where I could get to it). So, is it safe to tap it more to rotate the belt? Where is the distributor connector/low voltage wire connection located at, and how do I unplug it? That would help me to avoid damage to the ignition coil, right?

I can’t seem to get to the lower part of the belt, and the tensioner, without renting some tools, or taking it to a mechanic (which is what I was trying to avoid in the first place), but do you think it would be ok, if after rotating the belt and inspecting it, I put everything back together, drive it around a little bit (if it doesn’t blow up when I start it), then take the cover back off and see if there is new fluff? I have more questions… I seem to be lacking some torque specifications for all the nuts and bolts I removed… My Haynes manual lists the valve cover nuts torque specs to be 86 in-lbs, which I calculate to be 7.138 (7.1-7.2) ft-lbs. Is that right? I have seen similar #s in other forums, but I have also seen that you should just “snug them” because they’re real easy to break when you try to torque them to specs.

Also, since I’m going to take the cover back off, should I put the liquid gasket material in the corners of the cam recesses on the gasket, or just wait? What about the torque specs on the other bolts (the plenum/resonator, the little bracket between the plenum/resonator and the valve cover, the Power steering hose clamp thingie, etc)? Should I pour some oil over everything before I close it up, or will the oil pump in there quick enough to avoid damage? When putting the new spark plug well gaskets in, should I put any liquid gasket on them, or just “as is”?

I hope everyone knows how much I really appreciate your assistance!!! You guys are truly life savers! And Shryp, I appreciate the commiserating frownie face, but at first glance, it almost seems like you’re sad that you didn’t have any shavings on your belt! ; )

Thanks,

Dave
 

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Hey Dave , if you have the plugs out you can turn the engine with a 19mm socket on the power steering pump, or look in the wheel well for the star shaped cut out behind the wheel and put a socket and extension through to the crank pully again 19 mm . turn in the direction of normal rotation only. Good luck I have been watching your posts. The valve lash numbers are most likely your source of misfire, as the engine heats up the gaps will get even smaller.
 

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Hey Dave , if you have the plugs out you can turn the engine with a 19mm socket on the power steering pump, or look in the wheel well for the star shaped cut out behind the wheel and put a socket and extension through to the crank pully again 19 mm . turn in the direction of normal rotation only. Good luck I have been watching your posts. The valve lash numbers are most likely your source of misfire, as the engine heats up the gaps will get even smaller.
What he said. If you adjusted the valves you already turned the belt while getting each cylinder to TDC. Maybe you really are going senile! :)

As for the valve cover, you should be fine not gluing anything since you will be taking it apart soon anyway. You might get some seepage from the corners, but even if you do it won't cause any real harm.
 

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I've never seen belt shavings like that.

Any wear mark on the inside of the TB cover(s)? (Couldn't see anything in the pics) As in, maybe that belt is a bit loose and it's "flapping" and rubbing? (The loosest point would be on the tensioner side. TB motors are designed so that the crank PULLS the cam-wheels so that belt-run is always tight)
 

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Well, it is good that you did check the valve clearances.
Sorry to hear that there was 0 clearance on one exhaust valve, but hopefully it is not burnt. Was the nut on as tight as the other ones?
Strange that just one exh valve was that tight with the mileage you have on that engine.
As far as not harming the ignition coil, the small low voltage connector for the dist is located on a bracket just toward the firewall and within inches of the dist. You can just follow the wires (small ones) from the distributor to the connector. You could also remove the dist cap and disconnect one of the coil wires or probably just pull the fuse that powers the ignition.(don't know which one it is, offhand, but you can find out online).

If you do turn the engine over manually(ie:with a socket) , make sure you turn it in the proper direction or you may cause damage to the tensioner and/or make the timing belt skip a tooth or two. I believe it is CCW while looking at it from the crankbolt side, but double check.
Obviously the timing belt is/was rubbing on something, perhaps on the engine side. No advice as I have never changed a timing belt on a Honda CRV.
If you cannot find out whether it has been changed or not, it would be wise to have it done or do it yourself. It probably would cost around $500+ to have it done.
Looking at the sides of the belt and comparing the surfaces of the two might give a hint on where it is/was rubbing.
Sorry for no good help with your problem.
No need for any sealer on the spark plug tubes and I'm not convinced that you need any on the valve cover gasket if the gasket is in good condition.
Best of luck,
Buffalo4
 

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First off, GREAT pictures and write up so far.
I wouldn't put it past any mechanic to leave that crud in there. They're being paid by the job and the job is 'replace the belt' not 'tidy up the valve cover'. That being said, I don't think you're going to find any shavings when you take your cover off and would not be doing that if it were me. Seal it up good the first time and let it go. Your belt looks fine and you've done a good job getting all the crud out of there. Good work!
That #4 cylinder was the source of the miss fire as I'm betting the knock sensors detected the change in the explosion due to the tight valve clearance. Your engine will sound like the proverbial Swiss sewing machine now.
Please post a picture of it all buttoned up.
As for all the torque specs and whether or not to use sealer on the gaskets. Yes, I believe in the proper torque but snug should do for most of the ancillary pieces. If you can't find the exact torque rating for a specific bolt just look up a standard torque table from a Machinists handbook. That should be easy to do for a guy like you and they haven't used any 'special' bolts so I'm sure std torques will work well.
I've been impressed with the way Honda uses o-ring technology on its gaskets. I feel if you clean the surfaces of the mating parts, the crush built into the gasket will seal it most times. The only places I'd use sealer is at corners where two or more gaskets are trying to seal against eachother. I use Blue TRV sparingly in thos cases and it's worked well for me. A little RTV goes a long ways.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hello all,

After reading Blue12EXL comment (thank you!), I realized that I had, indeed, done exactly that, already, when I adjusted my valves. So I had to roll my eyes, go “Duh…”, and smack my palm on my forehead. Touché, Shryp, touché!

Carbuff2, there are no wear marks, or areas that seemed extra shiny, or extra dirty, on the top, or middle covers. The shavings were really fine, soft and fluffy, like whatever was rubbing was barely making any contact, at all. Of course, I can only see the top portion of the belt. When I was moving the belt (via crankshaft rotation, while adjusting the valves), it seemed like there was a slight variation in tension, at the top of the belt, between the cam gears (I believe this was occurring when the piston was almost, or at, TDC, but I’ll verify when I do the belt inspection in a little bit), but the variation was very slight, and didn’t seem to be enough to cause the belt to make contact with anything.

Buffalo4, after I feel ok with the adjustment, and TB issue, I am going to do compression and leak down tests, and possibly take it in and have the mechanic throw it on the scope, so I can get a more detailed picture of what’s going on (ok, maybe I’ll just take it in for the scoping…), and just to make sure everything is ok. I will hunt down that dist wire/low voltage connection, just for future reference, though. And yeah, it’s CCW, I made sure of that before I did the valve adj.

I examined (what I could see, so far) of the belt, and checked the edges really good. In my opinion, they look perfect… both edges look good, and both are set in from the edge of the cam gears, so it doesn’t look like the belt is pushed to either side (front or back, actually, I guess). I was disappointed in how small the pics of the belt “teeth” came out on my post, because they’re really large, and clear, on my computer, but the teeth look immaculate, as well. While the flat side of the belt looks perfect, as well, I was wondering if there shouldn’t be some sort of print on it (could be on the part of the belt I haven’t inspected yet), or if it was sanding off… What side of the belt does the tensioner push/pull on?

Changing the belt looked like a b***h! I think I have had it done for about $250-$300, but then again, I live in the past, a lot… I am putting a new gasket on, as the old one had apparently become one with the head (in an area about 4” long, the rest came off fairly easily). No good help? You’ve given me all kindsa help!

20CRVEX13, Thank you for the very kind comments! I am a very detailed person (to the point of driving a lot of people crazy), and keep spreadsheets, databases, notes, and pictures of everything I do (think Sheldon, à la Big Bang Theory). You’d think somebody that anal would be a little better with a vehicle maintenance schedule, but I have my short-comings… I will definitely look for this Standard Torque Table (I didn’t even think about that!).

Does anybody know, right off hand, what the thickness is on a new belt? I’ll see if I can find it, and maybe even go to AutoZone and measure one (if I can find my mic, or calipers…). If I measure the thickness and width, that might tell me something.

As usual, Thank you EVERYONE!!!!

Dave
 
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