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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently replaced tires and speedometer now reads faster as compared to confirmed GPS speed reading. Does anyone know if the speedometer can be calibrated to reflect correct speed?
 

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Recently replaced tires and speedometer now reads faster as compared to confirmed GPS speed reading. Does anyone know if the speedometer can be calibrated to reflect correct speed?
Did you buy different size tires from the original equipment?

I doubt there is any adjustment available in the speedometer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Same size in theory. 235/60/18. Got rid of the Hankook that has 684 revolutions per mile to Continental TrueContact that have 718 revolutions per mile. Since the speedometer is digital I was "expecting" that somewhere there is the ability to adjust. Thanks for your input.
 

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If you deviate from the recommended tyre size(s), it stands to reason the speedo will be incorrect.

....which in turn begs the question as to why someone would knowingly purchase tyres of a different size?
 

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Same size in theory. 235/60/18. Got rid of the Hankook that has 684 revolutions per mile to Continental TrueContact that have 718 revolutions per mile. Since the speedometer is digital I was "expecting" that somewhere there is the ability to adjust. Thanks for your input.
Note that the replacement tire may not be an exact size match. That may be the issue........ or....

So... you are allegedly seeing a ~ 5% increase in wheel revolutions, based on the numbers your reported. What did you use to establish those numbers? It matters. That said.. not much of an issue, seeing as you can have changes of 2-3% just with the normal aging of the tires over time, not to mention air pressure matters.

Did you actually measure the tread-to-tread diameter of the tires, while on the wheels, before and after replacement? THAT would tell you the most.

Did you check and compare tire pressure? Differences in tire pressure can result in different wheel spin rates (which is hot TPMS actually works on gen5s).

Is your vehicle AWD or FWD? Do you have all the traction control systems active or not? It matters. AND... different tire treads can play a factor here as well.

More homework needed on your end of things here, I think. :)

As for the question of do you have a digital adjustment for the speedometer? THAT would actually be illegal in most states... because it opens up the window for mileage fraud in the used car markets. Generally, I believe this is something that a dealer would be required to adjust, so that the state knows there were no shenanigans at play.

My theory... based on the limited information you provided ---> you ran your Hankooks routinely at higher tire pressure than what was set by the installers of the new tires. There is also the plain fact of old rubber vs new rubber performing differently on road surfaces in a vehicle with traction control systems in play.
 

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Same size in theory. 235/60/18. Got rid of the Hankook that has 684 revolutions per mile to Continental TrueContact that have 718 revolutions per mile. Since the speedometer is digital I was "expecting" that somewhere there is the ability to adjust. Thanks for your input.
718 doesn’t equate a 235/60r18
looks like continental is slipping a quasi 235/55r18 or something else by customers. Is even 235 mm wide?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you deviate from the recommended tyre size(s), it stands to reason the speedo will be incorrect.

....which in turn begs the question as to why someone would knowingly purchase tyres of a different size?
Tires are not bigger relative to specifications. They are 236/60/18 which is the correct size. The difference is in the circumference. If you look at tires of the same size (235/60/18) the circumference is different between manufacturer. Thus Hankook is different than Continental or Pirelli or Michelin or Goodyear. The variance can be as much as 1 to 2 MPH plus or minus. It would be great to correct the variance for tire circumference by manufacturer. To answer your question why would anyone purchase tires of different size? Not sure why anyone would do so. I purchased the correct size (235/60/18).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Note that the replacement tire may not be an exact size match. That may be the issue........ or....

So... you are allegedly seeing a ~ 5% increase in wheel revolutions, based on the numbers your reported. What did you use to establish those numbers? It matters. That said.. not much of an issue, seeing as you can have changes of 2-3% just with the normal aging of the tires over time, not to mention air pressure matters.

Did you actually measure the tread-to-tread diameter of the tires, while on the wheels, before and after replacement? THAT would tell you the most.

Did you check and compare tire pressure? Differences in tire pressure can result in different wheel spin rates (which is hot TPMS actually works on gen5s).

Is your vehicle AWD or FWD? Do you have all the traction control systems active or not? It matters. AND... different tire treads can play a factor here as well.

More homework needed on your end of things here, I think. :)

As for the question of do you have a digital adjustment for the speedometer? THAT would actually be illegal in most states... because it opens up the window for mileage fraud in the used car markets. Generally, I believe this is something that a dealer would be required to adjust, so that the state knows there were no shenanigans at play.

My theory... based on the limited information you provided ---> you ran your Hankooks routinely at higher tire pressure than what was set by the installers of the new tires. There is also the plain fact of old rubber vs new rubber performing differently on road surfaces in a vehicle with traction control systems in play.
Per Hankook and Continental website specifications the revolutions per mile are less for the Hankook and obviously greater for the Continental. Tire pressure are 33 front and 30 rear done cold. CRV is a Touring thus AWD. Speed is verified by comparing speedometer reading to GPS (not CRV Nav). Hankook tires speedometer at 70 GPS at 70. Continental tires speedometer at 70 GPS at 69. This would reflect the difference in tire circumference. I've done the research. I a m asking if there is a way to correct the speedometer to reflect correct speed.
 

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you can calibrate the tpms on the headunit. If you need the speedometer calibrated from honda its about $100 & they have to use the ihds unit.
For example
If you upgrade to the honda oem 19 accessory wheels and tires part of the installation has the tech use the hds to adjust accordingly.
If not you’ll be off %
 

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I a m asking if there is a way to correct the speedometer to reflect correct speed.
Asked and answered already.

I really do not know why you are sweating a 1mph difference though. That level of difference in literally "in the noise" and it will continue to change as your tires age and wear.

And note: GPS accuracy in consumer receivers that are in motion has it's own issues..... Unlike the military which uses GPS with dual differential receivers, consumer products are generally single receiver units.. and are subject to a range of fluctuations, and work most accurately when stationary. The proper way to test and calibrate mph on wheels is on a 4 wheel dynomometer setup.
 

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I really do not know why you are sweating a 1mph difference though. That level of difference in literally "in the noise" and it will continue to change as your tires age and wear.
Unfortunately his problem is that the vehicle is reading faster than it should, and it will only get worst as the tread wears off. I'm wondering if 2-3% is an acceptable manufacturer tolerance for tires? I've never seen it that bad however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Asked and answered already.

I really do not know why you are sweating a 1mph difference though. That level of difference in literally "in the noise" and it will continue to change as your tires age and wear.

And note: GPS accuracy in consumer receivers that are in motion has it's own issues..... Unlike the military which uses GPS with dual differential receivers, consumer products are generally single receiver units.. and are subject to a range of fluctuations, and work most accurately when stationary. The proper way to test and calibrate mph on wheels is on a 4 wheel dynomometer setup.
Some of us are OCD and revel in accuracy. The GPS I used to check is by no means your standard run of the mill units.
 

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Suzuki vstrom motorcycles inheritantly overestimate speed by at least 5% and have done this for models over at least the past 15 years, even when they brought out digital speedos.
My previous vehicle..a Nissan Xtrail also overestimated speed by 5%. I compensated on that vehicle by purchasing slightly larger tires. 1 or 2% error is not a concern at all.
 

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i Use the world clock with seconds to make sure all my appliances are in sync.
Our coffeemaker had a slower internal battery/clock so i returned it.

ocd life
(y) (y)

I always make sure that at least one device in my home is using a radio connection to a world clock transmitter. Currently, it is one of my digital thermometer units, and one of my digital clocks. Makes it really easy to access accurate current time for those days when the power get's interupted and I need to go around resetting devices that are not internet connected to a clock source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
(y) (y)

I always make sure that at least one device in my home is using a radio connection to a world clock transmitter. Currently, it is one of my digital thermometer units, and one of my digital clocks. Makes it really easy to access accurate current time for those days when the power get's interupted and I need to go around resetting devices that are not internet connected to a clock source.
The Amish are offering a new service to keep all your clocks and timing devices in sync.
 
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