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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2007 CRV AWD is riding a little rough these days with 150k miles. Ride is bouncy, chirps some on turns, clunk when turning wheel all the way to left.

I was thinking of doing all the stuff in the thread title at the same time, then get an alignment at the shop. Any reason not to do all this stuff? Would any particular order of doing so be easier? Any special tricks/tools I may not find when I start checking out the Youtube vids?

Thanks
 

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2007 CRV? How long do you plan to keep this vehicle? If planning to sell soon, all planned work has near zero appreciation by its next owner. Actually, most traded vehicles this age are sold at mass auctions and new buyer is never told about its recently replaced parts.

For replacement parts, I like Moog brand. Especially their grease version products. But if planning to sell/trade soon and part must be replaced, do look at Dorman brand parts instead. I use both product brands and tend to pick Moog over Dorman.

If planning to keep vehicle for a while, do investigate the aftermarket "adjustable" rear upper control arm upgrade as well. I hear ebay / amazon sells this custom aftermarket part as well. Note: Adjustable upper control arms allow its rear wheels to be adjusted with proper camber (lean). I never did like Honda's factory "fixed length" upper control arms.

And I agree with previous poster. re: Don't replace all suspension parts because you think the part needs replacing. Only replace the part if its worn out (and must be replaced). Keep saved money and buy its "adjustable" upper control arm instead. re: Put money where its needed - not where its wanted.

If replacing parts yourself, do have a hand grinder and WD-40 juice available. Older age items are often too rusty to easily remove "with ease" and one often needs to grind it out. Ouch! Even on my 2014 CRV, I had to grind out its End Link bars off. That added extra time per hub. I'm sure professional shops can remove stubborn parts much faster.

While doing mass suspension parts replacements, do investigate its current visual "stance" as well. If you feel its 2007 suspension has settled / sagged since its creation date, do consider replacing its coil springs as well. Thus, refreshing its "spring area" as well. To keep costs lower, you might want to install 20mm lift kit (re: spacers above its struts) instead. If wondering, I installed low cost 20mm lift kit in my 2014 CRV (which lifted it 30mm / 1.5") and it works great. Especially for my north region - where need for more ground clearance for deep snow is critical. And, a raised vehicle is much better on my back as well.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As a little more info, I plan to drive this car to the bitter end.

I took it to the shop when it first started getting bouncy a few months ago and they told me the struts needed replacing, although it was not critically urgent yet. I did the fronts with Monroe Quick Struts but haven't done the rears yet. I figured I'd do them now along with bushings, links, ball joints since that stuff doesn't seem to add too much money and are probably worn out at this point anyway.
 

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No reason not to, but no need to, just replace as needed. But unl as you replace with the actual parts Honda uses, the new parts won't last as long as actual OEM.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I like doing my own work you can save a lot of money plus you can get to know your car better, and see other things that may need attention.
try to replace items back as close to what they were before removing, then after complete take it to a quality shop for a alignment Tire Discounters has good equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I got the Moog "problem solver" sway bar links. They have a grease fitting. Do they come pre-greased or do I need to grease them? I don't have a gun yet and have never done this. These links came with no instructions whatsoever. Also it was irritating because the welded nut on the back that you grab with a wrench to hold it in place while torquing the lock nut is the same size as the lock nut, and I don't have two wrenches of the same size. Dumb decision on their part imo not to make it a different size.
 
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