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okay this sounds stupid, and the answer is probably simple, on my 2000 cr-v after my throttle body, attached to and ontop of my intake manifold is a big hollow square-ish pice of aluminum. is this where all the fumes from my crank case evaporates to? thats the only thing i can think of. i removed it and could see stright down into my intake manifold is it okay to remove this and cap the hole? and if so would i reap any benifits?
 

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it holds air. Lots of companies have played with the giraffe idea for intake manifolds for years and adapted and merged different manifolds to get the best chamber size/shape for the ultimate all motor and or turbo intake manifold they can, trying to have a reserve of air waiting or what ever. Think of it like this, you put a smaller intake pipe on, less air, less hp, you make this smaller, less tourque. If you do swap it out, make sure to get the skunk 2 one, or the ITR one though, and if you get the ITR try to get it with the ITR throttle body. Do you have an intake, header exaust yet? I would do those first, but to each his own. (I plan on doing this myself, if the parts just happen to fall in my lap :D;) )

If I had the time/money/energy I would base dyno my car, then re-dyno it right after a itr manifold/TB swap, but I just cant anymore.
 

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so it would be a bad idea? alot of sites say to remove the resonator, illegal said i would lose tourqe but why? if its just used to cancel out sound
A large part of a resonator's function is sound related but because of the way it works, it has other benefits as well. Because a typical automotive engine is a reciprocating pump, the flow into and out of it, becomes pulsed. A pulse in the flow is a spike in the pressure-time curve just like a large base speaker produces in your stereo system. The pulses are relatively low frequency (RPM dependent, of course) so they can be heard as intake noise. By reducing the amplitude of the pulses, an intake resonator not only reduces the perceived "noise" but it also smooths the flow. This allows more efficient operation (each cylinder gets equal volume, etc.) when using intake (or exhaust) manifolds.

When using "tuned" intake or exhaust systems, the idea is to USE the pulses to benefit both charging and scavenging individual cylinders and in this case a resonator has no place and would actually interfere. That's a whole different story, however.:)
 
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