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I know the oil dilution problem has been beaten to death on this forum and I thank the contributors for their insightful posts. I have a 2018 EX-L with 6200 kms on it and it seems to be diluting again, after the fix was done. My question is this: would the use of a slightly heavier oil, perhaps 5W-30 or heavier be advisable or safe for our engines? My thinking is that the recommended oil is extremely thin and since it is constantly being diluted anyway, why not use a slightly thicker viscosity? I have not used synthetic oil before, so perhaps these oils are more durable than dino oil.....I don't know. I have resigned myself to the plan to simply change the oil at 5,000 km intervals in the future in the hope of avoiding accelerated wear on the moving parts. Thanks for your thoughts.
Neil W
 

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With fuel dilution a 5w-30 will quickly dilute down to the viscosity of a 20-weight and should maintain a 1.0 cSt or so higher viscosity than 20-weight. So unless you live in a really cold climate, a 5w-30 should provide a bit more of a viscosity cushion and would certainly do no harm.

But. Even a diluted 20 weigh oil likely provides enough viscosity given how CRVs are typically driven. And, should there be an engine problem and Honda asks for maintenance records they could make life difficult if they discovered 5w-30 was used. And yes I know they would supposedly have to “prove” the non-specified viscosity caused the engine problem, but do you really want to have this argument with Honda as your car sits waiting for repair?

I may consider using a 30-weight, but only after my powertrain warranty had expired.
 

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Thick oil can cause premature bearing wear (as my boss learned many years ago). Most bearing wear happens before the oil light goes out and thicker oil slows the time it takes for the oil to reach the bearings. Also, modern engines have closer bearing clearances and smaller oil passages because designed for thinner oil.
 

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Growing up we would always see an oil viscosity vs operating temperature range chart in the owners manual. Depending on where you live, warmer climates or colder climates, you could safely choose to run a thicker or thinner oil and still be within the manufacturer specifications. However, this information along with instructions on how to change the oil is no longer printed in the user manual. Even so, I don't see why this wouldn't continue to be true even with a turbocharged DI engine. If you go up to 5W-30 and you live in a relatively warm climate, I would think it would be beneficial. You could even choose to run 5W-30 in the summer and switch back to 0W-20 in the winter. I would think the only negative would be losing 1-2 mpg (at most) by running a grade thicker oil.

Text Parallel
 

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As I said in the other thread, 5w30 is probably fine. CAFE is the only reason we run 0w20. I'm going to try a mix to try and get the viscosity up at least into the 6.0 range for the oil analysis.
 

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Thick oil can cause premature bearing wear (as my boss learned many years ago). Most bearing wear happens before the oil light goes out and thicker oil slows the time it takes for the oil to reach the bearings. Also, modern engines have closer bearing clearances and smaller oil passages because designed for thinner oil.
Think of all the temperatures at which cold engines are started. These span a huge range of cold oil viscosities: an 0w-20 starting at 30F is probably as viscous as a 5w-30 at 40F. Either weight works just fine unless you’re in the Arctic.

Bearing clearances haven’t changed for decades and, as oil pressure pumps are positive displacement, they will pump the same amount of oil at any viscosity.

I suppose there’s a practical limit here and wouldn’t advise running 10w-60 in a CRV, but there are lots of Civic 1.5T owners running 0w-40 without issue.
 

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Think of all the temperatures at which cold engines are started. These span a huge range of cold oil viscosities: an 0w-20 starting at 30F is probably as viscous as a 5w-30 at 40F. Either weight works just fine unless you’re in the Arctic.

Bearing clearances haven’t changed for decades and, as oil pressure pumps are positive displacement, they will pump the same amount of oil at any viscosity.

I suppose there’s a practical limit here and wouldn’t advise running 10w-60 in a CRV, but there are lots of Civic 1.5T owners running 0w-40 without issue.
Actually your quite incorrect on bearing clearances. all engines components are built with much tighter specs than decades ago. You are right that the oil pump delivers the same amount of oil regardless. However viscosity does a play a large part because the oils is compressed by the pump, that's how it's pumped. How all oil pumps work. Compression. Too high of viscosity puts excessive strain on the pump which can cause failure.

0w40 isn't a big deal at all. It's the first number that causes a lot of issues. The cold side. Thicker it is in the cold, the more strain put on the engine trying to force it to flow. That's part of why 0 weight is good during the winter for those in colder climates. Also for anyone it's less load on the engine to pump 0 weight oils so it's used to increase efficiency.

But unless you live where I get below 0, 5 weight is fine. I wouldn't go past 5w30 though unless your in a pinch and that's all the place has is heavier than 5w30.

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My daily driver is a 2013 Civic Si which is also designed to use 0W20 (my wife's DD is a 2018 CR-V--which I would list if I could find out how to add a signature on this site). When I had the Si in for it's first state inspection, i joked with my mechanic about the oil being nothing more than brown water. He warned me against changing to a heavier weight oil because the oil ports (passages) are designed for 0W20 and may not distribute thicker oil as well in some areas.
My game plan is to monitor the CR-V oil level (and smell) closely and replace it with 0W20 whenever needed regardless of mileage. It is unfortunate that we even have to consider any of these options for newer vehicles from a company that was always considered to design and build some of the best engines in the industry!
 

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Thick oil can cause premature bearing wear (as my boss learned many years ago). Most bearing wear happens before the oil light goes out and thicker oil slows the time it takes for the oil to reach the bearings. Also, modern engines have closer bearing clearances and smaller oil passages because designed for thinner oil.
That’s a common misconception with automotive engines. Oil reaches the bearings in the same amount of time irregardless if it’s a 0w or a 5, or 10w oil. It’s a pressurized feed, fed by a positive displacement pump. Every revolution moves the same amount of 5w-30 when cold as it does 0w-20, it just uses more power to do it.
Splash lubricated areas though, can take longer for the oil to spread to such as, valve stems, timing gears, etc....
 

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Actually your quite incorrect on bearing clearances. all engines components are built with much tighter specs than decades ago. You are right that the oil pump delivers the same amount of oil regardless. However viscosity does a play a large part because the oils is compressed by the pump, that's how it's pumped. How all oil pumps work. Compression. Too high of viscosity puts excessive strain on the pump which can cause failure.

0w40 isn't a big deal at all. It's the first number that causes a lot of issues. The cold side. Thicker it is in the cold, the more strain put on the engine trying to force it to flow. That's part of why 0 weight is good during the winter for those in colder climates. Also for anyone it's less load on the engine to pump 0 weight oils so it's used to increase efficiency.

But unless you live where I get below 0, 5 weight is fine. I wouldn't go past 5w30 though unless your in a pinch and that's all the place has is heavier than 5w30.

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Main bearing clearances are only slightly tighter now than they were for my 1966 396 Chevy V8 which was .0005-.0032 inch... Not much.

They are still about the thickness of a human hair...

What's much tighter now is piston to cylinder wall clearance and use of low friction piston rings.

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My daily driver is a 2013 Civic Si which is also designed to use 0W20 (my wife's DD is a 2018 CR-V--which I would list if I could find out how to add a signature on this site). When I had the Si in for it's first state inspection, i joked with my mechanic about the oil being nothing more than brown water. He warned me against changing to a heavier weight oil because the oil ports (passages) are designed for 0W20 and may not distribute thicker oil as well in some areas.
My game plan is to monitor the CR-V oil level (and smell) closely and replace it with 0W20 whenever needed regardless of mileage. It is unfortunate that we even have to consider any of these options for newer vehicles from a company that was always considered to design and build some of the best engines in the industry!
Go ask that guy if Honda designed the oil passages different for a US, European and Asian model CRV.

The answer is no they didn't. The difference between 0w20 and 0w30 is negligible. At cold temp the kinematic viscosity is the same. At 100 C the gap changes, but for most of the temp they are quite similar. Again, if you want to thicken a little, just mix them.
 

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From the online owners manual in Japan for the 2019 1.5L turbo CRV, the recommended oil grades are 0W20, 0W30, 5W30 and 10W30. Choose your poison.
View attachment 128277
An oil thread post with some facts, not opinions.......how refreshing.
 

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Heat management of the engine is impacted in large part by the injectors. Honda’s are designed to operate on low current, a design used worldwide by Honda. Whereas some manufacture’s operated on higher current.
 

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From the online owners manual in Japan for the 2019 1.5L turbo CRV, the recommended oil grades are 0W20, 0W30, 5W30 and 10W30. Choose your poison.
View attachment 128277
Can someone explain why I can't find those oil specs here in America? What is the difference between the Japanese 1.5 and the American version? I have severe dilution and would like to use a thicker oil to mitigate the problem.
 

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It simple, EPA's "Off Cycle Credit" for low viscosity oil. For a manufacturer to claim the credit they have to attempt to ensure the owner of the vehicle only uses that oil for the life of the vehicle. In this case only show 0W20 in our manual. Japan has no such requirement.
 

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It simple, EPA's "Off Cycle Credit" for low viscosity oil. For a manufacturer to claim the credit they have to attempt to ensure the owner of the vehicle only uses that oil for the life of the vehicle. In this case only show 0W20 in our manual. Japan has no such requirement.
Would it be safe to assume that using 0w-30 would be safer for an engine with severe dilution when compared to 0w-20?
 
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