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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about buying a 2018 CRV EX AWD. I live in Chesapeake, VA and I'm frequently out of town for work. The reason for the AWD is I dont ever want my wife to be stuck anywhere if it snows.

Couple questions though, what's a decent price? I'm getting a quote for 26,500 OTD.

Second, do you recommend getting any dealership items (i.e. undercoat or sound deadening material for the undercarriage)?
 

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OTD is pretty much worthless as different states etc. have different taxes, fees, etc. The dealers selling price, not including taxes/fees, subtracted from the total MSRP (+any dealer add-ons) gives you a % discount. To the best of my knowledge, Honda is not offering any rebates on the CRV......dealers are selling them almost as fast as the factory can make them so I wouldn't expect to see a big % discount by the dealership.

There's lots of sound deadening material on the underside from the factory. I believe there is a rust warranty as well.

AWD is probably a good idea but it will never compensate for good common sense when driving in bad weather. Somebody said AWD/4WD will just get you stuck even deeper when not using some common sense.

Some folks in their 2WD CRV can out-drive anyone in a AWD/4WD vehicle...how do I know this, those folks said so. :Wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. To clarify, the MSRP was $29,445.
Dealers price is $26945 + TTL.
$2500 for trade in (05 CRV AWD)
OTD price is around $26,400
 

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IF you really do not want your wife 'stuck when it snows' then make sure you have a dedicated set of winter tires - all season tires are crap in the snow.
 

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Our Hampton Roads area doesn't get much snow, but as you know, only the Interstates and major routes are treated, and it gets pretty hairy at times. If your wife will need to go out in that mess, you definitely should get the AWD. (I didn't get it since I am retired and can choose to just stay home!) As others have stated, AWD isn't as effective unless you have winter tires as well. I remember a study that said that front wheel drive with snow tires was better than AWD with regular tires.

As for pricing, look up Checkered Flag's no haggle price (which is listed on their internet site). Take that quote to Priority -- they were quite willing to give me a better price. (I also sent you a private message with more info on both dealerships). Good luck.
 

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looks like a great deal from my end, Long Beach California :)

good luck with your crv hunting. I wanted to get an AWD too so we could just go to the mountains and canyons anytime we want but ended up with just the FWD to save some $. I am now regretting it cause we were thinking of going to big bear for the snow this coming holidays.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Tha is for all the info folks. I'm settling for an LX AWD.
MSRP 25,445
Trade in 1750
OTD: 22,900
I did this all over the phone. I misspoke when I told the guy what checkered flag was offering me. I told him what they were offering for a LX FWD and he beat the price.
Let's hope they keep to their word this morning.
 

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There is a big difference between lx and ex features and interior.. Hopefully you've test driven the lx and are ok with the compromises
 

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Tha is for all the info folks. I'm settling for an LX AWD.
MSRP 25,445
Trade in 1750
OTD: 22,900
I did this all over the phone. I misspoke when I told the guy what checkered flag was offering me. I told him what they were offering for a LX FWD and he beat the price.
Let's hope they keep to their word this morning.
Well I guess it's too late now but I would not have gotten a LX just to save the $$. I think an EX or EX-L would have been a better choice.


Rob
 

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2018 CR-V EX-L FWD Modern Steel Metallic
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was at my Honda dealer this am for them to ck on an issue w/the rear seat releasers from the cargo area.

while i was there, was chatting w/the sales people, asking why no CRV in the showroom. they said: "we drive it in, then we have to drive it out to a sold customer. we only have 6 CRVs on site right now. we just can't keep them in stock, which is a good thing."

i counted and they has 23 Pilots, 13 HRVs

btw- they said the cables have too much slack and feel better about getting replacement parts - i'm back there next saturday.
 

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was at my Honda dealer this am for them to ck on an issue w/the rear seat releasers from the cargo area.

while i was there, was chatting w/the sales people, asking why no CRV in the showroom. they said: "we drive it in, then we have to drive it out to a sold customer. we only have 6 CRVs on site right now. we just can't keep them in stock, which is a good thing."

i counted and they has 23 Pilots, 13 HRVs

btw- they said the cables have too much slack and feel better about getting replacement parts - i'm back there next saturday.
That sounds like a small dealer. There are 175 2018 CR-V's currently at my local dealer. They usually have one in the showroom that has all the dealer add-ons and is listed at close to $40k! Not too much of a risk in selling that one too often. :)
 

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The OTD price is the only price. Dealers use their add ons so they can make additional profit and show a higher percentage of discount and higher trade allowances when needed. 1st rule is never trade with a dealer. 2nd rule is never trade with a dealer. 3rd rule is never tell a dealer what kind of monthly payment you are willing to pay. So you are a monthly payment customer? The dealer now has other variables he can juggle to make you happy and make him more money while possibly extending the term of the loan and interest rate. Now you are only focused on monthly payments. Sure that matters but that isn't the only factor in buying the vehicle. The F&I man (in the finance office) is possibly the slickest salesperson on the premises. You may get close to your desired monthly payment but at what cost? A larger downpayment? Extended years in financing? His job is to close the deal, have you sign the sales contract and sell you credit life insurance and an extended warranty usually at a very high cost.

In most situations, you can get better financing at your bank or local credit union and most credit unions will finance 100%. Sometimes dealers will offer a better deal such as 0-2% financing on certain models and usually at shorter terms and smaller discounts. Do your initial looking on the dealers lot when they are closed so there will be no pressure or gimmicks from a salesperson. Step 1. Figure out what you can afford, then get your financing approved or pre approved. My credit union issued me a draft and I only had to enter the amount and vin number. Know what you can afford before you enter a dealership. Stick with that price. Do your shopping on your computer from at least 3 different dealers before you start talking with salespeople face to face. Get the out the door price. This price minus your down payment is the amount you will finance. I found that the big volume Honda dealers gave the biggest discounts, the ones that sell 200-300 units per month.

If you MUST trade, at least say nothing about the trade until you have your best price from each dealer. Now you know what you are getting if you trade. It will be ACV (actual cash value) or less. The price the used car manager puts on your trade is usually a few hundred less than what it will bring at the auction. If you are happy with the trade figure and MUST trade, go for it. If not, and you want to save money, you should be able to sell it for 30-50% more than the dealer offered.

I sold new cars (Toyota and Ford) for 5 years. Uneducated customers equal large profits for the dealer and salesperson. I can't count how many times a customer told me he was "just looking" but a couple of hours later he or she drove out the dealership in a new car and I made a very large commission. Good luck in your shopping. I'd rather get a root canal than go buy a new car!
 

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Dealer markup to 40k on a CRV? gez Some of these stealerships are nuts.
The dealer I purchased from started with a $35,697 list price. I started laughing when I saw it and I remember the salesman saying we ask for it and many times we get it. All that mattered was the price I paid out the door.
 

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I was flabbergasted to visit the Wilmington NC Honda dealership and see an extra sticker next to the manufacturer sticker, marked "additional dealer markup" that added $2500 to most every new vehicle on the lot. I even questioned 2 sales people on it, they stumbled, hemmed and hawed, and the best one could offer was "well, we have a lot of costs, the building, the staff, blah blah blah" Yeah, and that comes out of your initial profit on the car.

I suppose a few people might pay this, but I'm guessing it's just the dealer's way of setting the starting negotiation point higher. OUCH!
 

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I was flabbergasted to visit the Wilmington NC Honda dealership and see an extra sticker next to the manufacturer sticker, marked "additional dealer markup" that added $2500 to most every new vehicle on the lot. I even questioned 2 sales people on it, they stumbled, hemmed and hawed, and the best one could offer was "well, we have a lot of costs, the building, the staff, blah blah blah" Yeah, and that comes out of your initial profit on the car.

I suppose a few people might pay this, but I'm guessing it's just the dealer's way of setting the starting negotiation point higher. OUCH!
Toyota was one of the first dealers to do this back in the late 70's by adding around $450 to each car and call it rustproofing, paint sealant and fabric protector. Both dealerships I worked at did this. Ford would only do it to specialty cars. Recently I saw a Ford dealer add $10,000 to the price of a new Shelby Mustang and he called it Adjusted Market Value. It's really called additional dealer profit.
 

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The OTD price is the only price. Dealers use their add ons so they can make additional profit and show a higher percentage of discount and higher trade allowances when needed. 1st rule is never trade with a dealer. 2nd rule is never trade with a dealer. 3rd rule is never tell a dealer what kind of monthly payment you are willing to pay. So you are a monthly payment customer? The dealer now has other variables he can juggle to make you happy and make him more money while possibly extending the term of the loan and interest rate. Now you are only focused on monthly payments. Sure that matters but that isn't the only factor in buying the vehicle. The F&I man (in the finance office) is possibly the slickest salesperson on the premises. You may get close to your desired monthly payment but at what cost? A larger downpayment? Extended years in financing? His job is to close the deal, have you sign the sales contract and sell you credit life insurance and an extended warranty usually at a very high cost.

In most situations, you can get better financing at your bank or local credit union and most credit unions will finance 100%. Sometimes dealers will offer a better deal such as 0-2% financing on certain models and usually at shorter terms and smaller discounts. Do your initial looking on the dealers lot when they are closed so there will be no pressure or gimmicks from a salesperson. Step 1. Figure out what you can afford, then get your financing approved or pre approved. My credit union issued me a draft and I only had to enter the amount and vin number. Know what you can afford before you enter a dealership. Stick with that price. Do your shopping on your computer from at least 3 different dealers before you start talking with salespeople face to face. Get the out the door price. This price minus your down payment is the amount you will finance. I found that the big volume Honda dealers gave the biggest discounts, the ones that sell 200-300 units per month.

If you MUST trade, at least say nothing about the trade until you have your best price from each dealer. Now you know what you are getting if you trade. It will be ACV (actual cash value) or less. The price the used car manager puts on your trade is usually a few hundred less than what it will bring at the auction. If you are happy with the trade figure and MUST trade, go for it. If not, and you want to save money, you should be able to sell it for 30-50% more than the dealer offered.

I sold new cars (Toyota and Ford) for 5 years. Uneducated customers equal large profits for the dealer and salesperson. I can't count how many times a customer told me he was "just looking" but a couple of hours later he or she drove out the dealership in a new car and I made a very large commission. Good luck in your shopping. I'd rather get a root canal than go buy a new car!
I agree 100% with what you said. I've tried to tell younger people these things for yrs. When my daughter was in her teens I took her with me buying my first used CR-V. I told her what to look and listen for on the test drive and what questions to ask the salesperson. I also took her in when I did the negotiating and met with the F/I guy. Last yr she bought her first used car w/o any help from me. She lives 425 mi away. She negotiated a 2010 Subaru from $10250 down to 8600 and got several services thrown in. I was a proud papa.

The only thing I disagree with you on is your later post where you say you'd rather have a root canal than buy a new car. That's the fun part if you know how to handle them and negotiate. I've gotten so good at it, salespeople tremble when I walk onto the lot. They know they aren't gonna get rich on me. But, if I have a good experience I'm always good for referrals.
 

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I was flabbergasted to visit the Wilmington NC Honda dealership and see an extra sticker next to the manufacturer sticker, marked "additional dealer markup" that added $2500 to most every new vehicle on the lot. I even questioned 2 sales people on it, they stumbled, hemmed and hawed, and the best one could offer was "well, we have a lot of costs, the building, the staff, blah blah blah" Yeah, and that comes out of your initial profit on the car.

I suppose a few people might pay this, but I'm guessing it's just the dealer's way of setting the starting negotiation point higher. OUCH!
When I bought my 2017, the dealership had quite a few leftover 2016 models. All the 2017's had a dealer applied sticker with a $1500 "market adjustment" and an automatic prep package with wheel locks, pin striping and nitrogen gas. I had them remove both add-ons before starting negotiations. I learned later that the "market adjustment" was added to encourage sales of the leftover 2016, and no one even blinked about removing it. Once the 2016 models were sold, I noticed the market adjustment stickers had been removed.

I guess if you're naive enough, you might get stuck paying for just about anything.
 
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