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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I am a new member and I believe I will be purchasing an all wheel drive crv soon. I have some general questons:

1. Is there any year to avoid or go after?

2. Are there any maint. issues? How often do you need a timing belt job?

3. What are the average MPGs that I should expect?

4. What should I expect to pay for one with 60k miles or less?

5. Is it true all wheel drive or is it mostly 2 wheel drive and do you have to engage anything for 4wd?

6. Any reason to buy one model (ex, exl, LX or se)?

7. Any suggestions in my search?

8. Would you buy certified pre-owned or would you do a private sale.

9. What is the factory standard warranty?
 

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Registered
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Hi,
I am a new member and I believe I will be purchasing an all wheel drive crv soon. I have some general questons:

1. Is there any year to avoid or go after?

2. Are there any maint. issues? How often do you need a timing belt job?

3. What are the average MPGs that I should expect?

4. What should I expect to pay for one with 60k miles or less?

5. Is it true all wheel drive or is it mostly 2 wheel drive and do you have to engage anything for 4wd?

6. Any reason to buy one model (ex, exl, LX or se)?

7. Any suggestions in my search?

8. Would you buy certified pre-owned or would you do a private sale.

9. What is the factory standard warranty?

1. I have not purchase a used car, best advice I can give is if possible use Carfax as a guideline. Be aware not everything is reported in carfax so be sure to do a independent inspection or take it to a very trustworthy independent mechanic.

Normally when looking at used cars.. (I did think about buying used car instead of new, but people always complained that after 6 months things start going wrong etc.. different story :D)

The first thing I do is a google search. Ex. 2008 CRV complaints, do it for every year and see what people complain about. Usually when people complain they make the loudest noise, the good people don't normally say anything, but at least you can get an idea of what can go wrong but might not happen to you. Another place to look up problems is NTSA, you can do your research at safercar.gov(vheicle owner) to see what else people complain about. Remember NO car is 100% perfect, so unless it is a known mass problem its probably isolated and if something goes wrong what people complain might.
As far as I know, Honda been using the same 2.4L engine for a while and I guess the same transmission? I am not into the very little details but as far as engine and transmission reliability on the CRV, I haven't heard or read any complaints.

The only complaint I do hear is rear differential making noise for not following scheduled service, which is 3 years/ 30,000 miles I believe. So good to change fluid if you decide to get one.

2. I think CRV has a timing chain? Manufactures have been getting away from timing belts for quite a while now. It does have a serpentine belt which is used to drive alternator, air conditioner and other accessories? I think that gen of CRV has drive by wire and electronic power steering so no belt for power steering. Timing chains never need to be replace if you keep your oil change regularly and you use the right oil.

3. according to Fuelly http://www.fuelly.com/car/honda/cr-v average is 23 mpg+ realize it might have European diesel versions and 2.0L engine instead of just US 2.4L engines. Only your habits can tell how well you drive.
With the 2012 I have, short city driving I get 21 MPG. which is not bad to me... and on the highway at 70 MPH+ max 80 MPH I get 26 MPG average.. so I don't hypermile or anything I drive it the way I drive any car, 1/4 to 1/2 throttle to get speed limit or above speed limit and just let the car coast down to recommended speed limit.

4. Sorry I can't help you there.. Cars are pretty expensive here in the NE. I seen people buy CRV EX versions for the price I paid for the LX, the EX is priced as much as EX-L here.. Best to use cars.com or autotrader.com to see what people are selling for around your area.

5. Honda used something called Realtime 4wd which is basically FWD until slippage, once the front tires spin faster then it should the differential should be pressurized and then activate the rear wheel for a few seconds. It is NOT meant to be a full time system like the Nissan rogue or Subaru forester. (So don't be surprise if your tires spin in snow then suddenly you get a push from behind)
This is for the new system but it explains how the old system works compared to the new system: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rux6jCbBfU4

6. Options? LX is basically there "base" trim. EX is the next one up with some exterior and interior stuff, and EX-L is almost all options installed. Look inside and compared the two the difference should be semi obvious, for 2012 LX does not have passenger arm rest, lights on mirror visor, speakers in the side mirrors, fog lights, steel vs aluminum wheels, roof rails (just something for you look on your own when looking at trims )they might be different from previous but at least you got an idea of where to start first.

7. Search? when shopping look for dealer reviews as well as first impression. If you get to the dealer and you start feeling uncomfortable or suspect they are trying to pull a fast one at you, just get up and leave. DO NOT be afraid to tell the person you are shopping at, thank your for your time or not interested and leave. Look for dealers up to 30 miles, DO NOT be afraid to drive further and look at other models until you find one you think you like.

There is a saying around here, nice guys USUALLY finish last, remember you can be a nice guy but both in real world and working people will take advantage of you. Your job is to realize when it is a good deal and when they are taking advantage. Don't be afraid to walk out and don't be afraid be a little rude sometimes. Remember it is there job to MAKE MONEY so being nice to you is one thing, but don't let your guard down and don't let them add stuff unless you really want it! Also be ready to tell them I am comparing prices and options, so even though they will tell you this has less mileage and clean carfax and price is good for today only, your job is to find the right price and the right one for you. One you can live with long term with NO regret. You did your research and you driven a few and this is THE ONE you want.

8. I wouldn't really care if it was certified pre-own, certified means that the car has a warranty and the dealer will honor it. Used cars might still have warranty depending on power train I think it is 5 years/50,000 miles? I would not buy from a private seller, but I will buy from a private dealer. Not a Honda dealer but people who run a used car shop.

9. Factory standard warranty is warranty for the car when it was new. As soon as it is registered it is good for 5 years/ 50,000 miles whatever comes first. Should you buy an extended warranty? Maybe, depends on price. if it is a couple hundred for a basic 1 year, 10,000 mile warranty then yes. I don't expect things to go wrong but I have heard many horror stories of things braking right outside warranty some as early as 1 week after it expired! Honda has been pretty reliable for a few hundred yes, if you get close to a grand for extended warranty then No, I would not buy the extended warranty.


As for shopping used cars here is what I would check before getting in.

1. Look under the hood, take the oil cap off and look inside and at the cap, If it is super clean on the bottom of the cap be suspicious, if you see thick black stuff or white cream it is sludge engine is no good. If it is brown, and oil is everywhere, it is normal. Also look inside where you pour the oil see if any sludge is inside or if you see shiny parts with no black/ white chunks.
2. Take out the tranny fluid dipstick and look at it. Clear pink/red is new meaning it has been changed. dark red is normal, and brown means it is getting there and tranny fluid should be changed. Black/ dark brown means never changed tranny might have worked very hard and should probably look at something else.
3. Alignment issue can mean something is wrong. When test driving find a flat road and let go of the steering wheel, see if it pulls to one side. If it pulls to one side usually means suspension/wheel or could have been in an accident. If the person is sitting with you, humor him/her and just look like you are holding the steering wheel when letting go.
4. DO NOT turn on the radio, listen for noise(grinding, thumping, loose stuff) road noise is normal.
5. Ask to drive on flat roads, highway, and hill course or if they ask you to choose yourself, go look at google map and plan your own route. Do not always stay with one linear flat road. You will never know if something is wrong.
6. Use the AC and heater make sure they work and when you finish your test drive go inside talk about price and then go back out and look under the car to see if it is leaking anything. if you see oil or anything dark under the engine when you walk pass, RUN!
7. Do not purchase the day you test drive, go to a few places and try out other cars, get a price and then go home and see which one you like. Yes, they will all drive the same or they should If one drives better then the other or one is quieter then the other then you get an idea what the CRV should be remember the condition is more important then how many miles or how cheap/ expensive one is!
8. Don't be afraid to ask if they can take a few bucks off. (if your not buying extended warranty). If you find one with similar milage <3,000 mile difference and the same trim LX, EX, (whatever) ask the dealership that you want to buy the CRV from, see if they can take a few bucks off.
Let them know that you are leaning towards there CRV,(because of something unimportant like they are closer, the color looks better, or they are more convenient to get to) the mileage is very similar but there price is better. Ask if they can take a few dollars off so the amounts are close enough (even if they are a bit more for lower mileage, if you can get any $ off it makes you feel good!) Make sure you let them know you are seriously considering to buy today. Once the price is set go pick up your car and make sure they don't pull any strings or last minute fees.
Normal fees should be taxes, registration, title, and one other. Look through paper work.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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9,530 Posts
My only comment is about Certified Pre-Owned.


When I was shopping in 2006, I found that a 2 or 3 yr old CPO car was about 10% ($2K USD) more than a non-CPO, and only 10% less than buying new. So, by purchasing a non-CPO car you would be betting that your new purchase would be suffering more than $2K in repairs.

For some non-Hondas this would make sense...



I finally ended up buying new and getting the color and equipment I wanted, rather than "settling" for something else. I have not regretted it....my V was NEVER brought back to the dealer until at 100K there was a mandatory recall.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Why did you say "for some non-hondas this would make sense"? CRVs seem to be everywhere, so I think I can get one the way I want it. Do you feel CPO is better than regular used?
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
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9,530 Posts
Why did you say "for some non-hondas this would make sense"? CRVs seem to be everywhere, so I think I can get one the way I want it. Do you feel CPO is better than regular used?
I think that a Honda is a reliable brand. So paying the extra bux for a CPO deal would not save money in the long run, as the cars PROBABLY wouldn't cost you a lot in repairs.

If you like a car as popularly equipped, you will do OK with selections. Frankly, I wanted a manual trans, and there were virtually NONE on used car lots in '06.

When you buy a CPO vehicle, you are betting that the car will require enough expenses over your ownership that the extra you pay will benefit you. You also get an extended warranty (but it STILL covers only defects in material & workmanship, not normal repairs like tires and maintenance).


It's like storm insurance. When you buy it, you are betting that a storm will come. The insurance co. is betting it won't. House USUALLY wins.


My daughter bought a CPO used car. It was in good shape, everything they were supposed to check were OK. EXCEPT---I thought two tires were a bit worn.

The dealer replaced all four before purchase.
 
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