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Discussion Starter #1
My better half's dad had an incident with his two year old Escape with 27,000-ish miles on it. Engine started running bad while driving home from a nursing home visit. Engine quits. Has it towed to the dealer, and finds out that the engine seized up since they found coolant and oil had mixed...so, yeah, a two year old car has a head gasket failure. I know he wants a new car out of it, but I know it won't happen as they are already offering a new engine for it. Only the dealer has done maintenance on it (even the oil changes), so they can't claim another shop made a mistake in servicing it. And he's one of those who drives like an old man (always has!), so it's not like he abused it.

I owned one Ford POS in my life, and it was a lemon. (Sadly it was before lemon laws took effect here in our state--I returned the car under warranty four times to fix the same problem that never did get fixed.) I see nothing has changed. I just hope there isn't all sorts of problems from the dealer's grease monkeys putting in a new engine. Many dealers in our area are not reputable. He'd never buy a Honda either--he still has that old "Pearl Harbor" mentality.
 

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Fords are not all bad, any more than Hondas are. I love my '07 V, but I would never buy a new one. I also love my '91 F250, which is and has been bulletproof. As was the F250 before it. And I would buy a new one. Ford has always made the best trucks, and still does. But I wouldn't buy an Escape either. It's like a mine field out there. The truth is that there are very few new vehicles worth buying, and there are similar horror stories from all carmakers. I had a friend who went through two new transmissions under warranty in his F150, but they finally got it right. I also have a friend who has an Escape and loves it. It has 120k on it now and has had no issues. So I think it's just luck of the draw. Like a box of chocolates.
 

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My mechanic had an escape in last week with around 60k. Total transmission failure.
I was toying with one for the kids.they make nicely priced used car buys. All of a sudden, getting something for myself and giving him my CRV is looking like a fR better idea.
 

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I've continuously had a Honda (or three) in my yard since the late 80's; only one was problematic (94 Civic). All were passenger type vehicles.
I've also continuously had a Ford in my yard since 98 - not one of them has caused me any trouble. All were trucks.

Just trying to put it all in perspective.
 

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If I was going to buy an American badged truck it would be a Ford but would probably end up buying a Toyota. All the car companies have have their little problem child's. I have had more faith in Honda's and Toyota's over the years. I am still butting my hard earned money with Honda because overall they do a better job with their products.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My ex also has a newer Escape (18 months old?), and I'm told she is driving a loaner car every couple of months due to some problem or other that comes up with it. She only leases those because her workplace had the discount for Ford and Nissan. (The one Nissan she had wasn't very good either, although not as bad as others. This one was rusting beneath the trunklid when it was just over a year old.) She probably leased the Escape, since the last time she bought a Ford, it was a Focus, and the resale value was so poor that she lost a ton of money. (She had a long commute at the time and leasing wouldn't have been possible with the mileage.)

I had such a terrible experience with my one Ford product (and their customer service and arbitration) many years ago that I won't have another in my driveway. That was what drove me to purchase a Honda in the first place. Can't say our '09s are all that great (I've fixed too many problems with them--I'm already shopping for replacements), but my '97 CR-V and '92 Civic were rock solid for all those years and miles.
 

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I used to get a (domestic) new company car every two years. The Fords were better than the rest (but never as reliable as our Hondas).
 

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T' otas make mighty fine autos / pickups (when you are pulling within their spec's); but because I pull a 16K pounds fifth wheel I must eliminate them from consideration.

All three big American manufactures will simple kick T'otas butt in a heavier pulling mode; personally I chose a F350 Ford dually.
 

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Obviously it won't cost your father-in-law anything for the engine since it's still under the 3yr/36K warranty. There is such a thing as a "defect" so unless you see a slew of Escapes having head gasket problems, it may not be an issue. A contractor who's building our fixed rail system has nothing but Ford products, from their trucks to supervisor cars. Spectrum cable operators here have nothing but Ford trucks and vans. Most ambulances and tow trucks here are also Fords. They must be doing something right. Our family used to be a Ford family until we discovered Hondas. Now my parents own a CR-V, we own 6 Fits and my older brother in NV who recently bought a 2017 F-150 4x4 used (and happy with it) just bought a used 2013 CR-V (I convinced him) and loves it. I'll turn him into a "Honda" guy one of these days.
 

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My mechanic had an escape in last week with around 60k. Total transmission failure.
I was toying with one for the kids.they make nicely priced used car buys. All of a sudden, getting something for myself and giving him my CRV is looking like a fR better idea.
I never jump to conclusions about failures in a vehicle unless I see that the problem is a "pattern failure" which is a common problem among a particular model of vehicle. Examples are ignition coil failures on Nissan Altimas are something I saw regularly in our shop; these were on cars with around 50-80K miles on them. The 2.4L Altimas had issues with the intake manifold gasket leaking (sucked in) at the #4 intake port which required many hours to replace a cheap part due to poor design. When a 4 cylinder engine requires removal of the intake manifold to merely replace spark plugs, that tells you it was poorly designed. Even V6 transverse engines like the Toyota Sienna require 3 hours to replace spark plugs because to get to the rear ones, you have to remove the intake manifold, which means removal of the wiper motor & linkages and the large metal support that the wiper system is attached to, while similar vehicles like the Odyssey takes you less than a half hour to replace the plugs. Whenever I look at purchasing another vehicle, I always look at serviceability and maintenance accessibility besides the "track record" of pattern failures on it. If it's all good, then I buy it. 44+ years in the automotive repair industry has taught me what vehicles are good to buy and which ones to stay away from. That being said, there's ALWAYS a possibility that you'll get a "lemon" so check it out well.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
To wrap it up--he finally got the Escape back with a new engine, not a rebuilt (as they were going to do originally). But he's over the Ford thing, and says he wants to get one of the Jeep products to replace it. :rolleyes: He's still one of those who is pissed off about Pearl Harbor (yeah, I know) and won't touch an import car, despite Honda putting a hell of a lot of people to work here in the US and building many of the models here. Hell, he could get a certified pre-owned Acura RDX and have one hell of a nice ride for many years to come.

I'm thinking he'll keep the Escape anyway. He bought a Ranger about 10 years ago and it has had no major problems.
 

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To wrap it up--he finally got the Escape back with a new engine, not a rebuilt (as they were going to do originally). But he's over the Ford thing, and says he wants to get one of the Jeep products to replace it. :rolleyes: He's still one of those who is pissed off about Pearl Harbor (yeah, I know) and won't touch an import car, despite Honda putting a hell of a lot of people to work here in the US and building many of the models here. Hell, he could get a certified pre-owned Acura RDX and have one hell of a nice ride for many years to come.

I'm thinking he'll keep the Escape anyway. He bought a Ranger about 10 years ago and it has had no major problems.
Just remind him Jeep is now owned by Fiat (from the land of Mussolini), though it still retains Chrysler in the full brand name. :p

I agree.. he will probably just keep the Ford. Unless there are a lot of blown headgaskets reported on the Escape.. he just got one with a defect from the factory. It happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just remind him Jeep is now owned by Fiat (from the land of Mussolini), though it still retains Chrysler in the full brand name. :p
Heh, yeah, no kidding--I totally get it myself. Such irony! And if that merger with Renault/Nissan ever happens, that throws the import issue up big time.

I always found it funny that certain types in my area wouldn't be seen in a Mazda Tribute, yet would buy the Escape...and they were nearly identical. Also the same with the Toyota (I forget the model) and the Pontiac Vibe. Mercury Villager and Nissan Quest--same except in badges and a few bolt-on styling changes. And the irony never failed to escape me when I'd drive past a UAW post, with a large sign warning that "ABSOLUTELY NO IMPORT CARS ALLOWED IN THIS LOT"...with all of these very same mixed-breed Fords parked in the lot. :rolleyes:

My better half got into it with some UAW numbskull on social media, a GM line worker, who was badmouthing her big time because of our Hondas. She shut him down quickly when she said that he worked for the same corporation that is importing the Buick Envision from China and selling it under an American brand name. There are still these simple-minded idiots building "American" cars with apparently no clue that they are assembling these things from parts built all over the world. (I will say that the sentiment in my area remains very strongly "buy American" and there is still a lot of hatred for imports. So this is not an uncommon exchange.)

Per government standards (parts and labor percentages), there were (and still are?) some Hondas that qualify as "American" where many so-called domestic nameplates fall short of the government requirements. Automobile manufacturing is so globalized these days that we really can't claim any car is produced as "American." And to be honest, I don't really care where a car is made, or who makes it. Is it reliable? Will it not leave me stranded? Will it last beyond the warranty? Will it have a good resale value if I decide to sell it (and not drive it into the ground, like I did my '97)? Will it get me around in my travels safely and comfortably? I made my choice with Honda simply due to being let down so often driving our "domestic" offerings. They had their chance with me, and failed miserably. If something better comes along in the future or my needs change, I'll consider others.
 

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In the 50's my father (RIP) was a Studebaker fan.
In the 60's he was a Dodge fan.
In the 70's he was a GM fan; in the mid 70's he purchased a Buick/ Pontiac dealership and eventually became a Buick LeSabre fan.

However by the mid 80's I became his common nightmare - due to my numerous GM made problems I switched to imports.

Your allegiances will likely depend upon your personal experiences. Do not count out current products strickly because of their past history - evaluate them using todays standards.

Currently I'm pleased with both my Ford (1) and Honda (2) products.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
My grandfather worked 25 years at Packard before retiring. He previously worked in the Pennsylvania coal mines before moving here. Various relatives have worked for automotive suppliers, including my father, who worked for companies that supplied interior trim to the automakers. That was how I used to get supplier-plan discounts on some of the cars. My cousins (who are a bit older than me) were typical of teens growing up in the 70s--back then, Chrysler and other automakers would hire them for the summer, and they would take in a fair amount of money working while their classmates were off for the summer. That doesn't even exist today.

Funny though, as much as my dad was a "buy American" type, he was the one who kind of sparked the whole Honda thing. Our old Lawn Boy mower had worn out, and he was shopping for a replacement in 1987. He came home with a Honda, saying that it had a lot more metal parts than the plastic junk the competition was selling. And he did the same when he bought the snowblower a year or two later. He still liked his Buicks (he owned them as far back as the 1950s), but his "dream car" was always a Jaguar.
 

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My grandfather worked 25 years at Packard before retiring. He previously worked in the Pennsylvania coal mines before moving here. Various relatives have worked for automotive suppliers, including my father, who worked for companies that supplied interior trim to the automakers. That was how I used to get supplier-plan discounts on some of the cars. My cousins (who are a bit older than me) were typical of teens growing up in the 70s--back then, Chrysler and other automakers would hire them for the summer, and they would take in a fair amount of money working while their classmates were off for the summer. That doesn't even exist today.

Funny though, as much as my dad was a "buy American" type, he was the one who kind of sparked the whole Honda thing. Our old Lawn Boy mower had worn out, and he was shopping for a replacement in 1987. He came home with a Honda, saying that it had a lot more metal parts than the plastic junk the competition was selling. And he did the same when he bought the snowblower a year or two later. He still liked his Buicks (he owned them as far back as the 1950s), but his "dream car" was always a Jaguar.
I have a 1937 Ford Tudor Sedan. Most of the car is Ford, but the engine, and transmission are Chevrolet.Ford made a darned good rear end. Mine came out of a 72 Ford pickup. Has 355 gears.
 

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I had a 2000 Ford Focus. 11 warranty repairs in 15 months. Always something different. I got way to familiar with the service department. After last repair I immediately drove to Honda and traded for a new Honda. Best decision I ever made. :)
 

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People think a shitknob cracking and being replaced in 20’minutes need ti talk to some 5/6 yr old focus and escape owners ? who’s cars are worth 80% depreciated value
 
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