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Discussion Starter #1
HELP! I have had my 2006 model CRV since new, and for 10 months had an issue when braking, with a thumping sensation under the brake pedal as though the brake pedal wants to keep smacking my foot. I have had discs and pads changed and just had new calipers.... still there!!!! Honda will not give me a price to do diagnostics on this, have taken to 3 garages and every one is scratching their heads. Please, please has anyone got any ideas on this???I need to keep the car for t least another 12 months, but cannot keep putting up with this, its scary when having to had brake. No sensation through the steering wheel at all, only the brake pedal. thank you.
 

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Not-a-Mechanic
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ABS malfunction might do that, but I'd first check mechanicals at all 4 wheels. Sticking sliders, wheel misalignment, that sort of thing. Also possible failed master cylinder or booster.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Maybe a bent hub or rust behind the rotor
The shop should use a dial indicator to see if rotor run-out is within specifications.

++++++++++

Here's another thought: a failing tire (tread separation). Easiest diagnostic is to rotate the tires front-to-back to see if the symptom changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Have had tyres, pads and discs changed all round, also calipers on rear. Thumping is harder the faster you are going when braking. Nothing on steering wheel and no pulling, so whatever it is, its on the rear.
 

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Everything above checked. Even asked Honda how much they would charge to diagnose, ..... they won't even give me a price for that! If they said £50 I would happily pay it then get the work done at my regular garage, but not going to put it in Honda and them charge me £200 and come back saying they can't find the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Everything above checked. Even asked Honda how much they would charge to diagnose, ..... they won't even give me a price for that! If they said £50 I would happily pay it then get the work done at my regular garage, but not going to put it in Honda and them charge me £200 and come back saying they can't find the issue.
 

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Have had tyres, pads and discs changed all round, also calipers on rear. Thumping is harder the faster you are going when braking. Nothing on steering wheel and no pulling, so whatever it is, its on the rear.
What’s the spec for your 2006 Honda CR-V? Is your car from North America? Sounds like you need to take the car back to the shop who did the brake work.
 

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Everything in Moderation
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So you had the REAR brake rotors serviced? Were the caliper slide pins properly lubricated, and the backing plates of the new pads lubricated?

We had one Honda that needed the rears rotors 'trued up'. You could feel the rhythmic pulsation in the brake pedal but not the steering wheel.

The rear spec for rotor run-out on that car was 4 thousandths". It was right a .004" and I could feel it.

+++++++++++++++

Remember that the parking brake is a small drum brake on the inside of the rotor hub. Perhaps the shoes are binding or they need lubrication on the backing plates.

Feel the wheel centers after a 5 mile drive. The fronts will be hotter than the backs, but they should be the same side-to-side.
Post back with your findings.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What’s the spec for your 2006 Honda CR-V? Is your car from North America? Sounds like you need to take the car back to the shop who did the brake work.
It is a diesel 2.2 exec. Thumping was there before, nothing they change seems to cure it. Made sure all items fitted are genuine.
 

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An undulating brake pedal is almost always caused by a warped rotor. Since the front brakes do 90% of the braking, it's usually a front rotor that's warped. One that is warped enough to create the pedal behavior you describe should be easily seen by simply putting the car up on a lift and spinning the wheels, watching the rotors as you do. It takes more than just a few thousandths off to cause that much pedal deflection. I would not suspect a tire or wheel issue, as that would cause serious steering or rolling shudder/vibration. A bad wheel bearing is a slight possibility, but that should produce a lot of noise at any rolling speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So you had the REAR brake rotors serviced? Were the caliper slide pins properly lubricated, and the backing plates of the new pads lubricated?

We had one Honda that needed the rears rotors 'trued up'. You could feel the rhythmic pulsation in the brake pedal but not the steering wheel.

The rear spec for rotor run-out on that car was 4 thousandths". It was right a .004" and I could feel it.

+++++++++++++++

Remember that the parking brake is a small drum brake on the inside of the rotor hub. Perhaps the shoes are binding or they need lubrication on the backing plates.

Feel the wheel centers after a 5 mile drive. The fronts will be hotter than the backs, but they should be the same side-to-side.
Post back with your findings.
What is 'trued up' Sorry, am ex fleet manager but never heard this expression and I am one of those that likes to know what I am asking a technician to do so that there is no misunderstanding. As you say, I can feel it through the pedal, faster I go when I brake, the more I feel it. Thank you
 

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'Trued up' means that they are spinning in a straight line relative to the axis of rotation. If they need truing they will look like they are wobbling as they rotate. I had this problem on a station wagon we once had. The front rotors weren't out by more than .005" and it was noticeable as a pulsing in the pedal.
If the rotors were 'turned' to put a new surface for the new pads to interface with, and not done correctly, this could cause the problem too.
 

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What is happening is as the rotor turns and you apply the brakes, as the 'wobble' comes around and passes thru the caliper, one pad is pushed back and the fluid is returned to the master cylinder, or tries to return. Since you're braking, you feel the fluid push via the brake pedal.
 

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What is 'trued up' Sorry, am ex fleet manager but never heard this expression and I am one of those that likes to know what I am asking a technician to do so that there is no misunderstanding. As you say, I can feel it through the pedal, faster I go when I brake, the more I feel it. Thank you
You need to check for “run out” of the brake rotor with a dial indicator to make sure there’s no excessive high/low spots through the entire rotation of the brake rotor.
https://www.brakebleeder.com/the-basics-of-rotor-run-out/
 

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Rotors are more cheaply made these days than ever, and as a result do not have a lot of extra meat on them for turning like they used to have. So, if a rotor has been turned once, and then gotten hot enough to warp, it will likely have to be replaced. By law they cannot be turned down past a certain spec. All shops that turn rotors have the charts.
 
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