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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - I’ve commented on a few threads about this but I don’t know if anyone has gotten an answer. It seems like more threads are starting to pop up about this in the cold weather.

My 2017 EXL started making this noise at about 500 miles in October. I brought it to the dealership and they told me it was normal. They entered it into the system “advised customer that this is the noise the high pressure fuel pump makes.” I said ok and went about my business.

2000 miles later in December and we’ve finally made our first payment on the car. It’s been about 10 degrees here in Buffalo and the knocking is extremely noticeable. You can hear it when the engine is idling in drive or in park. The sound goes away temporarily when you step on the gas. The sound is most audible from the back seat (where this video was taken).

I took the car back to the same dealership this afternoon and told them to get in the back seat. The 25 year tech said it sounded “like my car was in a wreck” and that “the sound definitely wasn’t normal” but he had no clue what it could be. The service advisor told me “just turn up the radio.”

Sorry, but for a $30,000 car it shouldn’t be knocking this loud. I understand various engine sounds but holy crap, this is insane. I can hear it OVER the radio when I’m sitting at a red light.

Any ideas? The other CRVs we test drove (we drove 4) did not make this sound. Please help.

https://youtu.be/xTPN68HXqd8
 

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I believe that my car is making the same noise. It sounds like it's in a washing machine spin cycle. I can only hear it in the cabin.

This is my 6th CRV. I had no major issues with my previous vehicles. However, I have not even had my first oil change yet on my new vehicle and it's making noises. I am taking it into the dealership next week.

Please update the thread if you find out anything and I will do the same.
 

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Your dealer is an idiot. The high pressure fuel pump is bolted to one of the engine camshafts. It would not produce sound at the back of the car.

As with any answer of “that’s normal”, try out one of the cars on the lot, and when it doesn’t make the same noise, make them fix your car.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Your dealer is an idiot. The high pressure fuel pump is bolted to one of the engine camshafts. It would not produce sound at the back of the car.

As with any answer of “that’s normal”, try out one of the cars on the lot, and when it doesn’t make the same noise, make them fix your car.
The tech who looked at it yesterday said it’s definitely not normal and he’s never heard it in a CRV before. I don’t recall hearing this noise on any of the other 4 cars we test drove while shopping for this one. My dealer won’t let me bring it in for a full diagnosis for 3 weeks so we’re going to try a different dealer today.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We took the car to another local Honda dealer and they just called and said “this noise is completely normal and it’s coming from the low pressure fuel pump.” I’m not convinced there’s nothing wrong with it. There’s no reason the fuel pump should be so loud we can hear it over the radio. We’re going to go pick up the car and demand to listen to one of the test drive units on their lot.
 

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So this dealer brought the service director out and he told us “well the fuel tank is plastic so you’ll hear everything, could be that your fuel is low so you’re hearing it more with the empty tank.” It’s a full tank right now :| So we demanded to sit in another car on the lot. I showed the service director the video on my phone and he said “oh well I didn’t hear THAT noise.” So he sat in it and confirmed I’m not crazy and the noise IS there. They said they’ll be contacting Honda to see if this has happened and if there’s a fix. Ugh.
 

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I have a 2018 touring, my low pressure fuel pump made similar noise, but yours sound twice as fast. I also had loud ticking/chirping from the high pressure fuel pump. Two dealers said the high pressure pump noise was normal. I used 4 oz of Lucas Oil Upper Cylinder Lubricant while filling up and after using up that full tank of treated gas the noise decreased from both pumps and it is now not as noticeable. The loudest noise I hear now is a rattle from my blower fan from mid to high speed, which the dealer said was normal, so I ordered an OEM blower fan and will be replacing it myself. I believe that unless a TSB exist for something that functions but noisy the dealer will not help. Try to find ethanol free gas if you live in a state that does not require it and see if the noise goes away.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I started a thread on this topic a week or so ago. My 2018 EXL makes the same exact noise. Mine is less than 3-weeks old, so I've only had it in cold weather so far. Your video sounds EXACTLY like my CRV right after a fill-up. Same thing, at idle, can hear that knocking from inside near the back seat. But the knocking noise decreases as the tank level goes down.

I have not had a chance to bring it in but I do worry there is an issue since most people here don't seem to have this noise. (maybe a bad batch of pumps?) Please update if you find anything out, I will do the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have a 2018 touring, my low pressure fuel pump made similar noise, but yours sound twice as fast. I also had loud ticking/chirping from the high pressure fuel pump. Two dealers said the high pressure pump noise was normal. I used 4 oz of Lucas Oil Upper Cylinder Lubricant while filling up and after using up that full tank of treated gas the noise decreased from both pumps and it is now not as noticeable. The loudest noise I hear now is a rattle from my blower fan from mid to high speed, which the dealer said was normal, so I ordered an OEM blower fan and will be replacing it myself. I believe that unless a TSB exist for something that functions but noisy the dealer will not help. Try to find ethanol free gas if you live in a state that does not require it and see if the noise goes away.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
Most of the gas stations around us offer ethanol free so we did try that - noise is still there, unfortunately.
 

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So this dealer brought the service director out and he told us “well the fuel tank is plastic so you’ll hear everything, could be that your fuel is low so you’re hearing it more with the empty tank.” It’s a full tank right now :| So we demanded to sit in another car on the lot. I showed the service director the video on my phone and he said “oh well I didn’t hear THAT noise.” So he sat in it and confirmed I’m not crazy and the noise IS there. They said they’ll be contacting Honda to see if this has happened and if there’s a fix. Ugh.
Sigh... dealers. Techs don’t get paid well for warranty diagnostics work, so there’s a strong temptation to blow you off.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So this dealer brought the service director out and he told us “well the fuel tank is plastic so you’ll hear everything, could be that your fuel is low so you’re hearing it more with the empty tank.” It’s a full tank right now :| So we demanded to sit in another car on the lot. I showed the service director the video on my phone and he said “oh well I didn’t hear THAT noise.” So he sat in it and confirmed I’m not crazy and the noise IS there. They said they’ll be contacting Honda to see if this has happened and if there’s a fix. Ugh.
Sigh... dealers. Techs don’t get paid well for warranty diagnostics work, so there’s a strong temptation to blow you off.

Funny you should say that - I work in an office that does car repairs (not a dealership) and many of our techs came from dealerships previously. They didn’t like the long hours or all of the cheap warranty repairs they had to do.
 

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Many car makers only pay for the time it takes to replace the part. Some will pay diagnosis time but the tech has to document all the steps and tests. Warranty work time is tight. At GM they would have very experienced techs do the job three times and then record the results. This is with all the right tools and years of experience. Techs like customer pay work, they make much more money. Also, many techs now are not as experienced as they once were. Dealers cut back to increase bottom lines as car makers keep cutting warranty times to save money. When I was working for one OEM to help reduce warranty costs we spent a lot of time training techs to get the right diagnoses the first time around. Of the three billion dollars a year the company was paying out in warranty costs one third was wasted as the tech totally missed the root cause of the problem first time around and the job had to be redone.
If you find a good dealer you can trust, hang on to them. As you know, some are much better than others. Most all have one or two really good guys but they keep them on the more complex work where they can make more money for the dealer. Some dealers have some real losers working for them. I had one of those work on my new 2017 when I got it. It had a simple bad switch on the power seat lumbar support but the idiot first put in a motor since it didn't work. (It did work, but only in one direction). When the motor didn't fix it he then put in the switch...when did fix it. The lame tech didn't know how to check a switch, he was just what is commonly called a "parts changer". Keep throwing parts on it until you get it to work....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Many car makers only pay for the time it takes to replace the part. Some will pay diagnosis time but the tech has to document all the steps and tests. Warranty work time is tight. At GM they would have very experienced techs do the job three times and then record the results. This is with all the right tools and years of experience. Techs like customer pay work, they make much more money. Also, many techs now are not as experienced as they once were. Dealers cut back to increase bottom lines as car makers keep cutting warranty times to save money. When I was working for one OEM to help reduce warranty costs we spent a lot of time training techs to get the right diagnoses the first time around. Of the three billion dollars a year the company was paying out in warranty costs one third was wasted as the tech totally missed the root cause of the problem first time around and the job had to be redone.
If you find a good dealer you can trust, hang on to them. As you know, some are much better than others. Most all have one or two really good guys but they keep them on the more complex work where they can make more money for the dealer. Some dealers have some real losers working for them. I had one of those work on my new 2017 when I got it. It had a simple bad switch on the power seat lumbar support but the idiot first put in a motor since it didn't work. (It did work, but only in one direction). When the motor didn't fix it he then put in the switch...when did fix it. The lame tech didn't know how to check a switch, he was just what is commonly called a "parts changer". Keep throwing parts on it until you get it to work....
I’m mostly annoyed that no one will put my car up on a lift or run a test on the fuel pump. They simply plug my car into the computer, looks for engine codes and then it comes back normal they say “welp, guess it’s just loud!” /sigh. An engine code isn’t going to show a lose clamp or something that can be physically operating right but loose or installed improperly on the car.

I know they don’t want to take it apart because the pump is inside the gas tank and it’s a lot of work. But for the amount you pay for these cars, they should be looking it over if there’s something wrong.
 

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Tacobella716, I know you replied to my thread, but my car makes the same noise and the dealer said its caused by the Purge Solenoid valve which is part of the evap system. They even told me they took another Honda Crv for a test drive and heard the same thing. They said the only way to stop the noise is to unplug the Purge Solenoid valve but that will cause an engine light to appear. When you rev the engine, it does stop for a few seconds, but the noise comes back. Its complete bull****, since I drove my 2017 Honda CRV for 5 months without hearing that noise and just last month is when I noticed it.

You can hear the noise here ----> https://youtu.be/M3YH2NrA2LQ
 

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My 2017 CRV Touring started making the "thumping" noise 6 weeks ago. It is most noticeable while idling. I took it to a dealer in Oregon who diagnosed it with a fuel pump problem, but they did not have a fuel pump available to do the repair. I returned to California where I live and where I purchased the car and after two weeks, they confirmed that it is the fuel pump. Fuel pumps are on "backorder" without a firm delivery date. I am apparently "17th in line" for a new fuel pump. (This is NOT the same as the recall from July--already did that). I have been driving a rental vehicle for 2 weeks and growing impatient. The dealers have been very compassionate and accommodating, but, "Honda" seems to be unable or unwilling to take care of this problem in a timely manner. I love my CRV and just want it back fixed!
 
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