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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
  1. Oil leaking - From the center of the vehicle, may be a faulty timing cover or timing cover gasket.Timing cover may be cracked. Or, a cracked/worn out gasket, reducing the tightness of the timing cover, resulting in oil escaping the engine.
  2. Engine running rough - Sounds like it is misfiring When a timing cover becomes damaged and does not properly seal with the engine block, dirt and debris can enter the engine areas like the crankshaft or camshaft. When this happens, the engine may run rough.
  3. Knocking sound - When timing cover is warped or loose, it may cause a knocking sound to appear from near the front of the motor. 1) Look right behind the radiator fan. If you see a flat, metal plate that appears to be shaking, the sound may be due to clanking against the engine block. 2) Inspect plastic cover for warping and bending into gears.
  4. Check Engine Light coming on - The timing cover is designed to seal the engine and keep oil or pressure from escaping. If a pressure or vacuum situation occurs, sensors in the motor will trigger the Check Engine Light to illuminate.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Welcome to the forum! Did you have a question? What year model are you talking about? Chain or belt? Generally, there is no reason you should ever need to replace a timing cover under normal use. These are interference engines, which means that, if the engine jumps time due to chain stretch, a bad tensioner, or broken components, the valves can and likely will hit the pistons. In that case, you will have much more serious problems. On the other hand, if you are repairing an engine where this has happened, I would check that cover very carefully for damage and replace if in doubt.

Otherwise, unless a lesser degree of damage has occurred and a loose chain has rubbed wear into the cover, or the cover is cracked, it should be good to go with a new gasket. But it's a matter of judgment, depending on the problem. I don't know of any known tendency for them to warp or crack or otherwise leak on their own, without a mechanical incident to cause it. If there is such a known factor, hopefully others will chime in on that. An oil leak in the area could be coming from any number of other places.

It'll be difficult to be more specific without more specific information. If you can provide more details, there are plenty of folks here who can likely help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know of any known tendency for them to warp or crack!

Thank you for your reply!!

Yes!
These covers do warp if not correctly installed; ie; gasket isn't properly aligned, cover bolts are over torqued, two main reasons why these covers tend to warp and bend into the gears. This problem with the Honda Timing Belt Covers has always existed. Seems more folks are experiencing it recently?
Not too much is out there or discussed regarding the issue. Appears to be most common with the Civics & CRVS.
 

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There is not such thing as a faulty or bad cover that will leak enough to cause any issues like you describe except for the oil leak. If it is that bad, it came out of the factory that way and is under warranty.

If there are those kinds of problems its issues you created trying to repair something yourself you shouldn't have. So you damaged the cover and other internal parts.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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+1 on what Tigris said. Honda timing covers are alloy castings. Castings, by their very nature, do not bend or warp, from installing or from engine heat. They are not the least bit flexible. What I said was that they don't crack or warp on their own. They can, however, be easily damaged if improperly installed, just as a gasket can leak for the same reason. They must be aligned properly and correctly and accurately torqued, in proper sequence. Over-tightening or misalignment will easily break or crack them. IIRC the torque setting is about 26 lb. ft., which is critically light. So, yes, they are somewhat fragile, and susceptible to unskilled hands.

Of course, an alloy head casting can warp, but that occurrence is always due to issues related to long term loosening of head bolts. The stress placed on a timing cover casting is nowhere near as great. In fact, Once properly installed, I don't believe there is ever any stress on it at all. It's just a cover.
 
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