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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't gotten any tire chains for my 2019 CRV EX AWD yet. We're driving into the mountains to visit family for Thansgiving and I see that a storm is forecast to come in. Some of the roads will likely have chain controls in effect--that is chains will be required with police checkpoints to enforce them.

Looking at all the choices on Amazon and trying to research them, I thought I'd ask for recommendations from this forum. I'm looking for chains that work well and are easy to install... and which ideally are economical... Any suggestions?
 

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Regardless the drivetrain layout, one chain on every wheel, all wheels equipped. It’s really unstable on one axle only. Especially in bends and sideways slopes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Google it...


I already did google searches. I trust the advice and wisdom of people on this forum.

For example, the etrailer link posted: Etrailer sells chains, and so they are "recommending" one of the most expensive versions they sell. The set they want us to buy from them is $267.87.This multiple times most of the versions out there. And so I have to get two sets and went with these, it would run me $536...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The Owner's Manual also recommends particular models, although they do not appear to be very highly rated on Amazon:


"Tire Chains
Install tire chains on the front tires only. Because your vehicle has limited
tire clearance, we strongly recommend using the following chains:
Models with 235/65R17 tires:
Cable type: SCC Radial Chain TC2111MM
Models with 235/60R18 tires:
Cable type: SCC Radial Chain TC2212MM"
 

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I already did google searches. I trust the advice and wisdom of people on this forum.

For example, the etrailer link posted: Etrailer sells chains, and so they are "recommending" one of the most expensive versions they sell. The set they want us to buy from them is $267.87.This multiple times most of the versions out there. And so I have to get two sets and went with these, it would run me $536...
Nothing says you have to buy that particular set of chains. Read the second link provided by racoon.

NOW... please look closely at the chains recommended by Etrailer. They are specifically designed to be easy to install, easy to align and they stay aligned.... and most importantly... they NEVER touch your alloy wheels if properly installed.

You could of course just pick and install the cheapest chains you can find... but don't come back here angry because they mutilated your allow wheels. :)
 

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Some of the roads will likely have chain controls in effect--that is chains will be required with police checkpoints to enforce them.
Where are you going?

Here in Montana, chain requirements are usually only for towing vehicles, i.e. tractor-trailer rigs.
 

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Here in Montana, chain requirements are usually only for towing vehicles, i.e. tractor-trailer rigs.
I know in S. California that when there's snow in the mountains they require chains on all vehicles that want to drive past a certain point. The last time it happened to me the signs were set up at a parking area, and all vehicles were required to pull into the parking area, install chains, before the police officers manning the checkpoint allowed them to proceed up the mountain.

I happened to be driving a 1972 Honda N600 at the time, and the officer treated me like I was an idiot as I tried to put the chains on the front tires. He insisted I put them on the rear, so I did. I got into the car, then spun the front wheels for him. He glared at me, growled "Front wheel drive?" and when I said yes he told me to put them on the front wheels and walked away to bother another driver.
 

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I happened to be driving a 1972 Honda N600 at the time, and the officer treated me like I was an idiot as I tried to put the chains on the front tires. He insisted I put them on the rear, so I did. I got into the car, then spun the front wheels for him. He glared at me, growled "Front wheel drive?" and when I said yes he told me to put them on the front wheels and walked away to bother another driver.
Wow, that's a good one!

Reminds me of once when I was pumping diesel into my VW Rabbit and I had a bunch of people yelling at me and calling me names. I put the nozzle into my car and I heard "Hey, you know that's diesel?", then a guy from another pump said "Look, that moron's putting diesel in his car", then I heard "You can't use diesel idiot, you're going to wreck your car!"

I just smiled and gave a friendly little wave and kept going about my business. It seemed like the people were getting genuinely pissed off that I was ignoring them. I found it to be rather humorous.

Now that I think about it, I'm lucky your cop buddy wasn't there to force me to go to a different pump!

By the way, I've never heard of a Honda N600. I looked it up and it looks like it would be a neat little car. It's like a little micro station wagon. I can't imagine it would be much fun to drive up a mountain with just 36 horsepower and a one barrel carb though. Of course my VW didn't have much more than that, so maybe I'm not one to talk.
 

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The N600 was a lot of fun to drive, but it was not fast. It was small enough that sitting in the driver seat with my left arm touching the door I could stick most of my right hand out the passenger window. It had 10" tires. Not 10" wide, 10" in diameter.

I did drive it up into the mountains to go skiing. It was very small, so had no room inside for skis. I found a ski rack that hooked over the top of a window, and then you rolled the window up to keep the rack from falling off. Perfect for one pair of skis and poles.

I was mostly skiing at Mountain High Ski Resort in Wrightwood, California at the time, as it usually wasn't as crowded as the bigger resorts in Big Bear, California. I lived in the San Gabriel Valley, and would drive I-10 east to I-15 North, and then take Lone Pine Canyon Road West into Wrightwood.
I remember one time that the parking lot at the resort was crowded, and they had a few employees out directing traffic. I had to stop while waiting for another car, and then had trouble getting moving again on the ice. The employee near me yelled for some help, but then leaned against the back of the N600 and was able to push it by himself and yelled "Nevermind!".
 

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...Any suggestions?
Get a good pair of work gloves.

And whichever chains you choose, if you've never installed chains PRACTICE installing BEFORE you head to the mountains.

A freezing snowstorm is not a good time to do your first-ever install -- especially if you discover a problem with your brand-new chains.
 

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I haven't gotten any tire chains for my 2019 CRV EX AWD yet. We're driving into the mountains to visit family for Thansgiving and I see that a storm is forecast to come in. Some of the roads will likely have chain controls in effect--that is chains will be required with police checkpoints to enforce them.

Looking at all the choices on Amazon and trying to research them, I thought I'd ask for recommendations from this forum. I'm looking for chains that work well and are easy to install... and which ideally are economical... Any suggestions?
I don't know where you are driving, but in the Colorado mountains all the notices for tire chains pertain to trucks, or rear wheel drive vans, etc. All you need is some great M&S tires with a good tread, or if you are extra concerned, dedicated winter tires without studs (in my area). You may want to talk with highway patrol in your area. AWD vehicles like the CRV get excellent traction in snowy conditions without chains (until they get high centered). Remember that you are no better than other vehicles when attempting to stop on ice.
 

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You didn't answer the question....where are you? Check your state's regs on their website.

I agree w/ms3224a...you don't need chains. I assume that the Montana man knows his stuff, as he has possibly seen snow once or twice before.

Pierrebear is correct, In Colorado, an AWD does not need chains. We've both seen snow before.

If you need chains, don't go. Your AWD will negotiate snow 6" deep, or more w/o chains.

I've yet to see enough snow, on the highway, that a FWD car won't negotiate...when the plows are running. If they aren't...stay home/parked.

I've heard, but have not verifed, that the CSP uses cable-chains exclusively. I'm pretty sure that CO-DOT does not run chains on their plows as it cause to much vibration. I know that the snow plows that I saw in the past 2 days (Mesa County Highway) did not have chains on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm in California. In certain places they have "chain control" - i.e. police checkpoints that they will not let you pass unless you have chains or snow tires on your vehicle.

Also, I'm not sure where this idea started that if you have 4x4 or AWD that you will never need chains or snow tires. It would be great if it was true, but when deciding to spend the extra money to purchase AWD or not, I did a fair amount of research into this. What I found was pretty persuasive in dissuading me of this notion. You can look into this yourself and see if you agree.

AWD or 4x4 lets you go up slick/icy/muddy roads and driveways that you otherwise would not be able to go up. It also lets you accelerate without slipping wheels from stop signs and red lights. And it will also make it less likely that you will skid in these situations.

But it provides only marginal assistance in letting you corner better and absolutely no assistance in braking on icy roads. Sure, a careful driver who is experienced with snowy roads can often do OK in a lot of situations. Where I like to go, there are lots of steep, twisting mountain roads with no guard rails - skid a few feet to one side and you can face a life-ending 1,000 foot fall. AWD helps for going up a road like that, but for going down a road like that (and going down is the most dangerous part) AWD provides no real advantages--there is no added benefit to having it that you wouldn't have in a 2WD.

Also, it turns out that stability control and traction control (both of which are on the 2 wheel drive models) are WAY more useful in keeping you on the road in these conditions than AWD. But these don't let you brake more effectively either.

And snow on the road is not a problem most of the time--if it is still snow that is.... Snow usually provides a fair amount of traction. The problem is ice. Snow gets compressed by other people driving it, refreezes and turns into ice. AWD or not, your stock tires don't handle that very well.

Think about it and it makes sense - your tires are your only point of contact with the road. But if you are skeptical, see this:


Key quotation: "Drawbacks: Can’t improve braking or cornering performance in snow...."

Still don't believe it? Come on some trips with me into the mountains later this season... :)
 
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