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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brand new 2020 CR-V close to a month and a half old. Thought I would check the tire pressure this morning. Yes, I did post regarding what pressure I should use,especially when the tires are hot after driving and need to be checked.

Cold pressure for the 18" tires should be, according to the manual; 33psi front, and 30psi rear. I have a very good accurate tire gauge, and just purchased a Milwaukee cordless tire inflator. Works great and very accurate. Mind you, I haven't touched the tires since taking delivery of the car. When I checked, the cold tire pressure . . . 41psi all around. So, nobody bothered to check this before handing me over the keys. Ooops, sorry, fobs. Is this normal to over inflate the tires at the factory? Now that the temperatures are hitting triple digit figures, I'm glad I decided to check the pressure. Anyway, the tire pressures are now at what they should be. I called the service department and asked why the tires were at that pressure when I took delivery? I even explained that the car has been sitting in the car port for two days. Why he didn't understand that I don't know because he kept going on about the fact that the tires will be at a higher pressure when they are hot. Hot? The damn car is sitting in my car port with an outside temperature of 70 degrees. How are they going to get hot, I kept telling him? His answer . . . "I don't know why you received the car with those tire pressure!" Anyone taking delivery of a new car better check your tires.
 

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Over-pressuring the tires helps keep 'em nice and round while the car sits around waiting to be bought, possibly for months.

My car got delivered with over-inflated tires too; when I saw that, I drove it back to the dealership and had them redo entire PDI. Since they didn't inspect the tire pressure, what else did they forget to check?

Ding 'em on the survey Honda's going to send you; there's no excuse for cars leaving the lot with the tires stupidly-overinflated.
 

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My 2017 was delivered by the dealer with 45 psi (tires hot, after arriving home) ... the rated maximum pressure for the tires. There is an item on the pre-delivery checklist to check and set tire pressure to specifications... but in my case I can see why that might have been over-looked as I literally took delivery on the vehicle 12 hours after it was delivered to the dealer.

No big deal.. and learned that manufacturers like to set the tire pressure to max spec for the tires when they ship to the dealers. Probably saves vehicles jostling loose and needed to be retied down in shipment, and of course sitting on the dealer lot.... more tire pressure makes for a happy tire sitting idle on the lot (keeps them round :) )
 

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Over-pressuring the tires helps keep 'em nice and round while the car sits around waiting to be bought, possibly for months.

My car got delivered with over-inflated tires too; when I saw that, I drove it back to the dealership and had them redo entire PDI. Since they didn't inspect the tire pressure, what else did they forget to check?

Ding 'em on the survey Honda's going to send you; there's no excuse for cars leaving the lot with the tires stupidly-overinflated.
Service department was closed; salesman don't know how. sry
 

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I test drove a couple of civics and CRVs, bought one of each over the last few years.

Test driving there was a noticeable noise and handling difference between each vehicle that I couldn't explain, and the sales person just shrugged his shoulders.

On the second or third visit I got out my tire pressure gauge and checked each vehicle after the first drive.

One vehicle had all the tires at 60psi, another at 45, only one was below 40.

I set the pressure per the door sticker and all of them drove much better and quieter.
 

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It ABSOLUTELY amazes me how incompetent the folks doing the Pre Delivery Inspections (PDI) are these days. I have bought way too many new cars over the last few years, ans EVERY one had the tires WAY overinflated. And from different brands and dealers! I just don't get it. If we, as buyers , don't let the dealers know of our dissatisfaction with this, it will likely NEVER change. As another wise poster mentioned, it really makes me leery of what else they missed, other than tearing off some plastic.

I'm not going to get into the merits of flat rate time, but I wonder if they are getting paid to spend x amount of time per vehicle, and spending x-10 on each, thus making a handy extra hourly wage?
 

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This practice is used mainly to provide for easier loading and unloading on car carrier trailers, which is precarious at best and way worse with low tires. Dealers rarely change it because they don't care about issues that don't otherwise affect them. Simple.

I run my 18's at 32 psi all around. Works great. Can't think of any valid reason to run different pressures on a street car. It has to affect handling and safety, too, as well as tire wear and care.
 

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When my PDI was done prior to collection, the tyre pressure was spot on.

I asked the dealership to overinflate by a few PSI. They asked why.

I explained that the extra pressure allows for better contact at the centre of the tyre, marginally lifting the outer and inner rim walls off the ground were erosion/wear happens first. It also means you get much better grip from the centre of the tyre as you have a bigger, sturdier surface contact with the road/terrain.

And of course, you get much more even tyre wear and that means more mileage out of them too. Having a dad that worked at Goodyear helped to learn these tyre tricks over the years. I would never drive around on the recommended PSI markings. A few PSI over is always better - especially when like now, most CR-Vs are just sat parked up and lets not beat around the bush - the CR-V is not a light car, so slightly overinflating the tyres is no bad thing if done correctly.
 

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I agree, but it will work differently for different tires because of construction. Observe wear patterns and adjust accordingly. You can wet the tires and see what is different when changing the pressures, as far as how it affects tire footprint.

Shhh! I hear footprints! :)
 

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Tires on my CRV were also over inflated (40 psi) when I bought it. I've had other Honda vehicles that were also over inflated. I get free oil/filter changes at my dealer. They check tire pressure as part of the service. I always recheck the next morning. Sometimes over inflated, sometimes same I when I brought car in (34 psi in all tires). Who knows how accurate their gages are. They are busy, so I'm sure it's rushed.
 

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I did a great deal testing on my civic, the closer I got to the listed spec the quieter it was and the handling got better.

At higher pressures it was greatly affected by the grooves worn in the road. It was even louder with higher pressure, the first time I test drove it there was a loud howl at highway speeds.

I didn't do the same testing with the CRV, I just set them as recommended and it's quiet and drives very well.
 

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Brand new 2020 CR-V close to a month and a half old. Thought I would check the tire pressure this morning. Yes, I did post regarding what pressure I should use,especially when the tires are hot after driving and need to be checked.

Cold pressure for the 18" tires should be, according to the manual; 33psi front, and 30psi rear. I have a very good accurate tire gauge, and just purchased a Milwaukee cordless tire inflator. Works great and very accurate. Mind you, I haven't touched the tires since taking delivery of the car. When I checked, the cold tire pressure . . . 41psi all around. So, nobody bothered to check this before handing me over the keys. Ooops, sorry, fobs. Is this normal to over inflate the tires at the factory? Now that the temperatures are hitting triple digit figures, I'm glad I decided to check the pressure. Anyway, the tire pressures are now at what they should be. I called the service department and asked why the tires were at that pressure when I took delivery? I even explained that the car has been sitting in the car port for two days. Why he didn't understand that I don't know because he kept going on about the fact that the tires will be at a higher pressure when they are hot. Hot? The damn car is sitting in my car port with an outside temperature of 70 degrees. How are they going to get hot, I kept telling him? His answer . . . "I don't know why you received the car with those tire pressure!" Anyone taking delivery of a new car better check your tires.
Each and every time I get my oil changed, the tires come back filled to 40 psi. I asked why. The answer was most people don't understand the concept of tires losing pressure in cold weather, sending them in droves to the dealership with their TPMS warning light on. Sigh. So, I set them to 32 psi and call it good. When the air temp drops outside, I check and fill them as needed.
 

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I would tell 'em that is not a proper solution, and to not touch my tires if that's the best they can do. In fact, it could be unsafe. And no chocolates for them, either!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Each and every time I get my oil changed, the tires come back filled to 40 psi. I asked why. The answer was most people don't understand the concept of tires losing pressure in cold weather, sending them in droves to the dealership with their TPMS warning light on. Sigh. So, I set them to 32 psi and call it good. When the air temp drops outside, I check and fill them as needed.
My feeling is that the customer should be at least informed as to what happens to a tire in cold weather. I think most people rarely check their tires pressure in the first place which leads to premature wear. Being on top of it will save them $$ in the long run.
 

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Each and every time I get my oil changed, the tires come back filled to 40 psi. I asked why. The answer was most people don't understand the concept of tires losing pressure in cold weather, sending them in droves to the dealership with their TPMS warning light on. Sigh. So, I set them to 32 psi and call it good. When the air temp drops outside, I check and fill them as needed.
Yeah.. an expedient solution for the dealer I guess, so as to avoid needless service calls about the TPMS. Seems a lot of owners never read their owners manuals, and have no concept of how to recalibrate the TPMS, much less what their tire pressure should be.

Here in California, by law, service centers (dealer or independent) are required to check and adjust tire pressure before returning the vehicle after service (part of state mandated fuel economy measures). My dealer consistently resets my tires to 33/33, even though the spec is 33/30. My guess is 33/33 works just fine and it does match the requirements for the other current generation high volume models sold by Honda (Accord, and Civic). When I get home, the next morning, I reset them to 35/32 as I find the drive of my 2017 CRV most satisfying with +2 lbs over on each cold tire.... a bit better handling for my driving, even though just a tad noisier on some road surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yeah.. an expedient solution for the dealer I guess, so as to avoid needless service calls about the TPMS. Seems a lot of owners never read their owners manuals, and have no concept of how to recalibrate the TPMS, much less what their tire pressure should be.

Here in California, by law, service centers (dealer or independent) are required to check and adjust tire pressure before returning the vehicle after service (part of state mandated fuel economy measures). My dealer consistently resets my tires to 33/33, even though the spec is 33/30. My guess is 33/33 works just fine and it does match the requirements for the other current generation high volume models sold by Honda (Accord, and Civic). When I get home, the next morning, I reset them to 35/32 as I find the drive of my 2017 CRV most satisfying with +2 lbs over on each cold tire.... a bit better handling for my driving, even though just a tad noisier on some road surfaces.
I set my tires to the required pressure of 33/30. But I might do as you have done, 35/32. I find that the required tire pressure doesn't do much for a smoother ride, so I might very well up the pressure a bit. Cheers.
 

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Our 2020 CR-V is the fifth Honda we have bought from the local dealer. Every one of them came to us with 40 PSI in all tires. I just expect it and bleed them down, this time to 34 all around.

We have the Touring with 19" wheels.
 

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The tires on my CR-V came with 41 psi nitrogen filled tires. After reading the door jam decal and reading what you are doing, I lowered the tire psi to 35psi front, 32psi rear. The ride was noticeably rougher, so a week later I decided to raise the psi to 41psi front 38 psi rear. Much better ride, NiceRide again.
 
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