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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might seem like a crazy question, but being a new car owner (CR-V), I'm wondering what tire pressure to use. The manual mentions for the 18" wheel, 32psi front, and 30psi back. These are when the tires are cold, and to pump the tires to that pressure within one mile of driving. First of all, I have no means of pumping up the tires at home, and I live at least 5 miles to the closest garage in which I can have the tires inflated. Besides, where I live we see (coming up too soon for my liking) temperatures around 110 to 115 degrees. My question is, what pressure should I set at the pump?

Thanks folks.
 

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Well, if you're going to go by the very strict guidelines...

1) Drive to where you can fill the tires, sleep there until morning, drive a mile, put air in tires.

2) Get an air compressor like this one, use it the same as above, but sleep in yer own bed.

My experience is that the tires will inflate 1 or 2 lb when warm. So if they are cold, inflate them 1 or 2 less than the target for warm (obviously). It really sounds like the number you're trying to get is the cold temp. I personally wouldn't even bother driving that mile, just inflate them cold to that amount. My choice would be to use my own compressor ;)

And use a gauge like this one to measure psi, they are highly rated.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Measure pressures cold, then at the pump you use (after driving). If for example, the pressure has increased 3 PSI at the gas station, 'aim' for 35/33.

You can buy pressure gauges cheap at Walmart, Target, or auto parts stores.
I've got a decent pressure gauge I use on my bike. Good advice on the numbers, but what about if it's really hot outside and I've driven for quite awhile, would that not alter the numbers some?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, if you're going to go by the very strict guidelines...

1) Drive to where you can fill the tires, sleep there until morning, drive a mile, put air in tires.

2) Get an air compressor like this one, use it the same as above, but sleep in yer own bed.

My experience is that the tires will inflate 1 or 2 lb when warm. So if they are cold, inflate them 1 or 2 less than the target for warm (obviously). It really sounds like the number you're trying to get is the cold temp. I personally wouldn't even bother driving that mile, just inflate them cold to that amount. My choice would be to use my own compressor ;)

And use a gauge like this one to measure psi, they are highly rated.

Cheers
I think that's a great idea. Is there a compressor similar to the one you show that runs off A/C and not the cars battery? Perhaps it doesn't drain much of the battery.
 

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I think that's a great idea. Is there a compressor similar to the one you show that runs off A/C and not the cars battery? Perhaps it doesn't drain much of the battery.
I'm sure there's one somewhere Bass, or a converter from ac110 to 12v, but it doesn't use much battery at all. Can always start the car if worried about draining it.

I wouldn't be without one personally. Always in the back of mine for car tires and bicycle tires :)

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm sure there's one somewhere Bass, or a converter from ac110 to 12v, but it doesn't use much battery at all. Can always start the car if worried about draining it.

I wouldn't be without one personally. Always in the back of mine for car tires and bicycle tires :)

cheers
Thank you, perhaps I will go with one of these.
 

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what about if it's really hot outside and I've driven for quite awhile, would that not alter the numbers some?
Sure, but it wouldn't be enough of a change to make a difference.

See, NOW you are talking about measuring after a longer drive, and not comparing under the same conditions.
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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I think that's a great idea. Is there a compressor similar to the one you show that runs off A/C and not the cars battery? Perhaps it doesn't drain much of the battery.
I have one of these little compressors, which I love. I keep it in my vehicle on road trips, but in the garage when in town. But I also bought a 120 -> 12vdc power pack that I plug it into when at home and that works great. The company that makes the compressor also sells the powerpack.
 

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Here in California, anytime your vehicle is in for service, be it a dealer or an independent mechanic, they are required by law to check and adjust your tires to spec... even if just getting an oil change.

Funny thing is... my Honda Dealer always sets them to 33 front AND 33 back, rather than what the specs say. Not a big deal as the front tires are the most important to get set right and 33 is correct. Anyway.. I always readjust them at home, and I actually set them for 2lbs above Honda spec (front and rear) with the tires cold sitting overnight. The vehicle just seems to be a bit more nimble on the road with a bit more air than spec'ed.

The factories actually over inflate to ~45 lbs for shipment... probably to reduce any movement when tied down in shipping.
 

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Good advice on the numbers, but what about if it's really hot outside and I've driven for quite awhile, would that not alter the numbers some?
It doesn't matter, Carbuff2's method still works:
"Measure pressures cold, then at the pump you use (after driving). If for example, the pressure has increased 3 PSI at the gas station, 'aim' for 35/33." My note: That's 3 psi above placard pressure.

First off the tire pressures listed on the placard in the door jamb are the pressures that cold tires should be at during the coolest part of the day (car not driven for several hours and tires in the shade).

Under these conditions record the press of any one tire. You might then drive quite awhile and it's now hot outside before you add air. Before adding air, measure the press of the same tire and calculate the press rise - say 6 psi. All tires will have increased press by this amount since the morning. Inflate all tires to 6 psi above placard press. The next morning all pressures will have dropped 6 psi and be at placard pressure, which is where they should be for cold tires at that time of day.
The same method would apply if you've only driven a short distance and the press rose by 2 psi.

A few other pointers:
  • No harm if tire press is several psi above placard during the day, as tires are designed for that. That's why the max. tire press noted on tire sidewall is many psi higher than the placard press.
  • It is much harder on the tires if they are a few psi under-inflated vs a few psi over-inflated. The placard press is the absolute min press the tires should ever be at.
  • Tire press changes 1 psi for every 10 F change in tire air temp. When the season changes from summer to winter, more air needs to be added to maintain placard press. E.g. If the coolest ambient temp is 60 F in the summer and 20 F in the winter, the press of a cold tire will drop by 4 psi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great advice. I'll keep that 6 psi rule in mind whenever I am out and want to check out the tire pressure. I usually go to Discount Tire near by. They have free service. I'll just tell the guy who pumps up your tires to make it 38 front and 36 rear. Should be good. I'll check the cold temp again the next morning.
 

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Great advice. I'll keep that 6 psi rule in mind whenever I am out and want to check out the tire pressure. I usually go to Discount Tire near by. They have free service. I'll just tell the guy who pumps up your tires to make it 38 front and 36 rear. Should be good. I'll check the cold temp again the next morning.
You make a good point. Suppose you decide to top up your tires later in the day and you hadn't checked the cold tire pressures that morning. Make a rough guess as to how much the tire press has risen during the day based on how much you've driven and the ambient temp rise - say 5 psi. Add 2 psi to your estimate and inflate all tires to 7 psi above placard press. No harm done if tires are a few psi over-inflated. The next morning check the pressures and bleed the cold tires down to placard pressure.
 

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....Or you can play nascar. Pull over quickly after driving aggressively. Use the back of your hand ( sensitive) to feel the temperature on the tire tread inner, middle and outside edge. If the center’s cooler, add air. If it’s hotter, let some out. 😎
 

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....Or you can play nascar. Pull over quickly after driving aggressively. Use the back of your hand ( sensitive) to feel the temperature on the tire tread inner, middle and outside edge. If the center’s cooler, add air. If it’s hotter, let some out. 😎
L O L..........................................................
 
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