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Discussion Starter #1
I have searched every CRV Guide and Manual that I know of and can not find any tire pressure chart for the 235/60R18 tires that mentions anything other than 33 psi Front and 30 psi Rear.

This is the first of the 22 cars that I have owned that doesn’t give both a Partial Load and a Full Load tire pressure rating for each axle. Some of them even suggested different pressures depending on the speeds at which you were planning to cruise, usually over 100 MPH. It was always a fun part of the build up to any vacation, getting out the bicycle pump and putting in the extra 7 to 11 pounds of air needed for the upcoming adventure.
I usually didn’t have to worry too much about the 100 part, unless I was going to Canada. ;)

Has anyone seen anything anywhere other than the blanket 33/30 recommendation?
 

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With a 850 lb max load weight, there's probably no reason to adjust the tire pressure.
I'd probably bump it something like 2 pounds to 35/32, if I was heading out loaded up on vacation, for instance. But I agree with you in general. With a max payload of only 800-ish pounds, no real need to play with tire pressures that much--you'd probably be fine at stock recommended levels. It isn't like we're talking about an F350 diesel and hauling a bed full of scrap iron and towing a horse trailer.
 

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I have never played with tire pressures on any vehicle I have owned. My CR-V tires, front and rear, are filled at 35 pounds and left there. I don't adjust the pressures for anything. Tires are wearing perfect. My diesel truck that is used to haul my wife's horses I don't have partial and full load pressures either. 60 pounds in the front and 70 in the rear, no matter what I'm hauling or towing, or if it is empty.

For the OP get yourself a pancake compressor to have, they are relatively cheap and nice to have. And forget about using a bicycle pump to put air in your tires.
 

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I run 35 front and rear in all of my 4 wheeled (car, pick-up and Suv) vehicles as I have done for many years. They might ride a little firmly but they last well and handle better on the crooked roads I drive. I keep a small compressor in my garage and I check the tire pressure about every 2 weeks on everything, especially my motorcycle.
 

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Are the tires filled with air or nitrogen? If Nitrogen wonder if the dealer would bring the pressure up to what you want or would it be a warranty problem?

Bob
 

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Mine are filled with 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and a few other gasses (argon, carbon dioxide). It's a super special recipe that's supposed to be really good for these tires.
 

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There is nothing special about nitrogen in the DD. The molecules are suppose to be bigger and hold a constant pressure better with temperature fluctuations. My truck tires when I purchased the vehicle new had it in them. Rotating the tires required different pressures from the front to the rear. The dealer and my research said to just add air to them. When I bought new tires they were just filled with regular air. IMO, nitrogen isn't worth it. If you have to add nitrogen for some reason why run around looking for it? I have two air compressors in my garage.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-care/should-you-fill-your-cars-tires-with-nitrogen.html

https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/nitrogen-vs-air
 

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Nitrogen in the tires is a joke. But if it makes you feel better ok. It does make your wallet a little lighter and your service manager smile.
 

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The tires are iso metrics with a load index of 103. From the tire manufacture's chart @30psi the tires are rated to support 1678lbs / tire, @33psi it's 1808lbs / tire. This is way above the vehicle's weight plus max cargo load.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
First of all, thanks for the input!
But after 2 days I’m beginning to think that 33/30 are the only published numbers. It probably has a lot to do with the general simplifying of maintenance items. After all, TPMS was Federally mandated for safety reasons. I guess I should be satisfied knowing that the CRV still has a dipstick and a spare tire, unlike the newer versions of our other daily driver.

Anyhow, I will let my tires remain at their ambient temperature induced +3 psi, at least until after our 4 adult 1 child road trip/vacation.

BTW: As far as I know my tires are filled with the usual 78% Nitrogen mixture and were over inflated to 40 psi all around by my dealer. A friend of mine paid $75 for a perpetual Nitrogen fill up when he bought a new car from a dealer that was more than 25 miles from his home. Of course that was only one of the many “great” extras that he paid for.
 

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I've always thought that the nitrogen option was a bit of malarkey. However, last week I heard Edd China state that the real benefit is the lack of water vapor which may undergo a bit more pressure variation with temperature. Not enough of a chemist to verify this or not, but it's the only truly reasonable explanation I have heard. Presumably really dried air could function as well.
 

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I've always thought that the nitrogen option was a bit of malarkey. However, last week I heard Edd China state that the real benefit is the lack of water vapor which may undergo a bit more pressure variation with temperature. Not enough of a chemist to verify this or not, but it's the only truly reasonable explanation I have heard. Presumably really dried air could function as well.
About a year and a half ago, I purchased a set of tires at Costco and they fill with nitrogen. For the first winter since I purchased my 2007, the TPMS alert wasn't going off all the time with the changes in temperature.
 

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I've always thought that the nitrogen option was a bit of malarkey. However, last week I heard Edd China state that the real benefit is the lack of water vapor which may undergo a bit more pressure variation with temperature. Not enough of a chemist to verify this or not, but it's the only truly reasonable explanation I have heard. Presumably really dried air could function as well.
That is the major benefit of nitrogen, it is less sensitive to temperature variation resulting in more stable pressure. It's the reason racing cars use nitrogen instead of air in their tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
That takes me back. Does anyone recall "Pink Air" from Fina gas stations in about 1966? :) http://www.adbuzz.com/OLD/GossageGallery/pink1.jpg
I'm definitely old enough but I had never heard of Fina gas until just now. Now I know "Pink Air" was an iconic tongue in cheek advertising campaign. They also had some great tag lines for their gasoline ingredient "Pflash". Now that I've seen pictures of their signage I'm almost positive that I have at least seen one of their signs.
 

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Nitrogen in the tires is a joke. But if it makes you feel better ok. It does make your wallet a little lighter and your service manager smile.
As one article from a major tire supplier said, "Your money would be better spent buying a decent pressure gauge and checking your tire pressures more often".

Nitrogen in your tires is a marketing scheme to milk more money from you. Yes, aircraft and race cars use it but that is more a safety item (fire suppression) than anything else. I love the salesman telling people that the nitrogen prevents the tire from rotting from the inside out. You should see an old tire when its removed. The inside (after years with plain old air in it) looks like new as it has not been exposed to all the UV from the sun, salt, etc. that you get on the outside of the tire.

Nitrogen is CHEAP! Its a left over byproduct when companies extract Oxygen and other gasses from the air. They use to just vent it off to get rid of it. We started using it years ago to do leak testing (its inert) and it was so cheap, about $5 for a big commercial H sized cylinder of it.

Its your money, spend it (well waste it in this case) any way you see fit. But don't think Nitrogen in your tires is some wonder cure all. At best it will not hurt them.
 

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The only time I "overinflate" my tires is in November when I put 4psi extra in.
That's simply to avoid having to add air during the middle of winter. Usually on the coldest day with snow covering the gas station...

TPMS became required in Europe as well.
Probably after the Firestone debacle.
 

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I will agree that nitrogen is more temperature/pressure stable than air, is free when you buy tires at Costco (cheap otherwise), an AC guy buys a whole cylinder for $13 these days and increasing pressures over 33/30 is not needed on these really oversized tires for the vehicle's weight. But the tire size may come in handy when the local floodwaters start rising.
 
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