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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all; quick question about tire wear. I have never owned an AWD vehicle before. Does one typically rotate tires like a “normal” car? The car came with 29,000 miles I believe the original tires. They seem pretty even wear.
What could I expect to get out of them? I had read AWD cars go through tires pretty quick, I’ll be mostly highway and figure about 40,000 to be replacing them. I believe they are Dunlop’s now.
Thanks!
 

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When the Dunlops wear out & time for replacement try not to get another Dunlop as they are hard & uncomfortable. The owner's manual should be able to tell you what's the best pattern.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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AWD has no effect on tire wear that I've ever seen or heard of. Nor does 4WD. Tire wear is a function of proper tire maintenance, timely rotation, alignment, and suspension condition, as far as the vehicle is concerned. Tire type, weather, and road surfaces are the other main variables.

Other than size and minimum recommended tire specs such as load rating, etc., and maintenance, my owner's manual has no tire info.

Tire choice has most to do with where you live, what kind of roads you drive on, and what kind of driving you do. I also just recently bought my CR-V used. The tires on it now still have some life left in them, but when I replace them I will get a full alignment done too. Then I will know where I'm at and can go from there. I do mostly city driving and some highway travel, and live in a hot climate, so I will go with a good all-season tire with good wet/dry traction and long wear. Personally I stick with Michelins. I'm a retired truck driver with over 5 million miles under my belt, and in my experience nothing else compares.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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10,712 Posts
Your Maintenance Minder will recommend rotating the tires every oil change. That is Good Practice, as you are encouraged to replace the rubber in sets of 4.

Regards tire 'life' (in miles): the OEM tires have been proven to last less than a quality replacement. OEM rubber is selected based on low rolling resistance (MPG) and quiet ride, not life.

You will find differing views on rotation patterns. :Darn:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks!
They certainly seem ok for now, I do mostly highway driving but that’s in the Northeast we have snow, ice, monster potholes. I am in a rural town with back road driving, so quite a mixed bag for me. I realize everything is a compromise. Just looking ahead, love the car so far.
 

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2016 CRV EX-L AWD
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We've had AWD cars with tires last longer than FWD cars. So it depends on a lot of things as mention from the other poster. As for rotation, you rotate them like normal car unless they are directional, then its just front to back.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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My tires on my newly acquired CR-V have 27k on them. They look like they are good for another 20k, But I will just watch them and see. They are Pirelli Scorpion A/S's, and feel too stiff and noisy (LOUD!) to me, so I don't care much for them, but there's no sense in wasting whatever life they have remaining. It could take up to a year, but I am considering a trip to visit family next year, and if I do that I will replace them first.

Tire rotation is a controversial issue, and being a retired truck driver, I have my own set of prejudices, of course. Back when radial tires first came out, a cardinal rule of rotating was that you never reversed direction of rotation, meaning keep the tires on the same side of the car, never turn them around. The reason was that the weave pattern of the steel belts would take a directional set during break-in, and once set you never go against it. Doing so would end up in a broken belt. In those early radial days, I actually had a couple of tires break belts, and they had to be replaced. This could also cause a blowout. So, my rotation pattern was front to rear and rear to front only. No X patterns. I still follow the same rule today. Why? I have never seen an announcement from the tire industry that this has changed. I do see that they recommend X patterns today, but I don't buy that those steel belts no longer take that set. I could be mistaken, but until someone shares specific official information otherwise, I will stick to what has always worked for me. Of course, if someone has access to that information and wants to do that, I will read it and take a fresh look. Meanwhile, I have gotten good results with my method. Also, the only tire maker I trust is Michelin, so their word is the only word I would accept.
 

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2012 CRV EX AWD
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308 Posts
My tires on my newly acquired CR-V have 27k on them. They look like they are good for another 20k, But I will just watch them and see. They are Pirelli Scorpion A/S's, and feel too stiff and noisy (LOUD!) to me, so I don't care much for them, but there's no sense in wasting whatever life they have remaining. It could take up to a year, but I am considering a trip to visit family next year, and if I do that I will replace them first.

Tire rotation is a controversial issue, and being a retired truck driver, I have my own set of prejudices, of course. Back when radial tires first came out, a cardinal rule of rotating was that you never reversed direction of rotation, meaning keep the tires on the same side of the car, never turn them around. The reason was that the weave pattern of the steel belts would take a directional set during break-in, and once set you never go against it. Doing so would end up in a broken belt. In those early radial days, I actually had a couple of tires break belts, and they had to be replaced. This could also cause a blowout. So, my rotation pattern was front to rear and rear to front only. No X patterns. I still follow the same rule today. Why? I have never seen an announcement from the tire industry that this has changed. I do see that they recommend X patterns today, but I don't buy that those steel belts no longer take that set. I could be mistaken, but until someone shares specific official information otherwise, I will stick to what has always worked for me. Of course, if someone has access to that information and wants to do that, I will read it and take a fresh look. Meanwhile, I have gotten good results with my method. Also, the only tire maker I trust is Michelin, so their word is the only word I would accept.
This is the Michelin's tire rotation recommendation https://www.michelinman.com/US/en/safe-driving/tire-safety/tire-rotation.html for you.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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yst - Thanks for that link. I looked at it, and also the tire owners' manual, page 14 on rotation. So, the pattern I use is for uni-directional tread patterns. Hmmm. I still don't see any information on belt construction that refutes what I said above. I do see that they show cross (X) rotation for other tires. But, until I see proof that newer belt construction methods eliminate the issue and belts are not harmed by this, I will stay with what has worked so far, and maintain directional rotation.
 
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