Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've always owned american cars, and older cars, 1999 and below. They all had spark plugs, rotors, distributor caps, etc... and a throttle body, that were easily found. I was prowling around inside the hood of my crv and noticed that it doesn't have a distributor, but instead a computer controlled feed. To me, under the hood of my gen2 looks like a dismantled toaster. Also, where is the throttle linking? Or for those of you not technical, or I said it wrong... the thing you can pull on and the engine goes faster.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
841 Posts
I've always owned american cars, and older cars, 1999 and below. They all had spark plugs, rotors, distributor caps, etc... and a throttle body, that were easily found. I was prowling around inside the hood of my crv and noticed that it doesn't have a distributor, but instead a computer controlled feed. To me, under the hood of my gen2 looks like a dismantled toaster. Also, where is the throttle linking? Or for those of you not technical, or I said it wrong... the thing you can pull on and the engine goes faster.
Your 2002 (Gen 2/K24A1 engine) has a Coil On Plug (COP) ignition system. Each coil is fired based primarily on crank position (also on cam positions). Crank position is fed to the ECM by a reluctor/pulser ring on the crankshaft and a sensor in the chain case.

Your throttle linkage is via a cable to the throttle body. The cable wraps around a cable drum under a cover on the front side of the throttle body. It directly moves the TB butterfly valve. There is an accelerator position sensor but it is used differently from Gen 2.5 (2005 and 2006) CR-Vs which switched to a "drive-by-wire" (all electric) throttle.

San Leandro Honda Online Parts
Part #13 is the reluctor ring.

San Leandro Honda Online Parts
Part #12 is the throttle body gasket (interface).

San Leandro Honda Online Parts
The throttle drum is on the near side of the TB under part #3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
The last vehicle I owned that may have been 100% North American was an '83 Chevy C-10 with a 235 straight six. And after I tuned it up a few times and rebuilt the carburetor once, and after brake jobs and a new clutch, it was no longer 100% American anyway.

American or not I liked the looks of the engine compartment. You could almost sit inside it to work on the engine and there really wasn't much to work on. But what there was to work on a shade tree mechanic could handle. Ah the good old days.

JPO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I agree wit hthe being able to sit inside an engine compartment to work on it. On my GMC and silverado, I could do that because of the amount of space on both sides of the engine. The engines also had a look of toughness, so you could walk all over them and sit on them and not feel bad.

And thank you to whoever it was before that helped me locate the throttle body.



 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top