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Another great video, thanks.

My new wheels came with new 12 pt lug nuts and a really nice 12pt deep socket that gives plenty of fender clearance. It's always good to hear that click/beep verifying the proper amount of torque.👍

What is up with the smilies????.......I can see the bottom half of one and the top half of the one directly below.🙃

135681

135682
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another great video, thanks.

My new wheels came with new 12 pt lug nuts and a really nice 12pt deep socket that gives plenty of fender clearance. It's always good to hear that click/beep verifying the proper amount of torque.👍

What is up with the smilies????.......I can see the bottom half of one and the top half of the one directly below.🙃
Thank you As I made my brake vid... what I like doing helping out tLol
 

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Pro or private, it doesn't matter. If you are going to do it, it's worth doing right. Also, you don't use a cheater on a torque wrench. Using one in any context is just asking for trouble. When you snap off a lug bolt and have to replace it, you'll know then. You can also crack an alloy wheel beyond repair that way. Besides, it's not that much torque. My 16-year-old granddaughter didn't have any trouble with it, no cheater needed. Plus, I value my Snap-on torque wrenches too much to mistreat them.
 

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Considering we're talking about a private citizen and not a business, that doesn't have much to do with the context of our quotes.
Well actually it does.
You don't have to be a professional to do things correctly.

Did you know you can over tighten a fastener?
Did you know over-tightening a seatbelt bolt by only a few foot-pounds can fatigue a bolt causing it to shear off in an accident?
Did you know over-tightening an axle nut can deform the bearing causing premature wear and failure?
Did you know over-tightening a lug nut can stretch a stud making a lug more difficult to remove again and near impossible to reinstall?

Professional or not, there is a right way to do things and a wrong way to do things. Being a professional I know the difference.
Do as you wish.
 

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Pro or private, it doesn't matter. If you are going to do it, it's worth doing right. Also, you don't use a cheater on a torque wrench. Using one in any context is just asking for trouble. When you snap off a lug bolt and have to replace it, you'll know then. You can also crack an alloy wheel beyond repair that way. Besides, it's not that much torque. My 16-year-old granddaughter didn't have any trouble with it, no cheater needed. Plus, I value my Snap-on torque wrenches too much to mistreat them.
We were talking about a person in their own garage doing the work. You came in talking about professional with customers. Yes it does matter, in the context of what we were talking about.
 

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Well actually it does.
You don't have to be a professional to do things correctly.

Did you know you can over tighten a fastener?
Did you know over-tightening a seatbelt bolt by only a few foot-pounds can fatigue a bolt causing it to shear off in an accident?
Did you know over-tightening an axle nut can deform the bearing causing premature wear and failure?
Did you know over-tightening a lug nut can stretch a stud making a lug more difficult to remove again and near impossible to reinstall?

Professional or not, there is a right way to do things and a wrong way to do things. Being a professional I know the difference.
Do as you wish.
It doesn't unfortunately. Fishy showed in the video that someone can torque it properly without a torque wrench. In the context of what we were talking about, it doesn't.

You, yourself even said, "maybe on your own car." Which is what we were talking about.
 

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Well actually it does.
You don't have to be a professional to do things correctly.

Did you know you can over tighten a fastener?
Did you know over-tightening a seatbelt bolt by only a few foot-pounds can fatigue a bolt causing it to shear off in an accident?
Did you know over-tightening an axle nut can deform the bearing causing premature wear and failure?
Did you know over-tightening a lug nut can stretch a stud making a lug more difficult to remove again and near impossible to reinstall?

Professional or not, there is a right way to do things and a wrong way to do things. Being a professional I know the difference.
Do as you wish.
Also, while you can usually get away with a short extension between a socket and torque wrench, longer is not better. Anything that increases the distance between the torque head and the socket is increasing the length of the lever, mathematically speaking, and will render, or throw, the applied torque off. While this may not be critical on some things, it can be a disaster on others, such as working on aluminum engines, or in smaller conditions, such as inch-pounds, etc. Or larger ones, such as the lugs on the steering axle of a big truck.

So, when you're at the tire shop, and you see the guy torque down your lugs with a deep well socket and a six-inch extension, Those bolts will not be torqued properly, which is not only improper but can be dangerous. You can prove this yourself. Use that same setup, then remove the extension and re-check.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Is that more or less a way a person starts insulting one who took a forum members request to use a torque rachet here and bringing
It doesn't unfortunately. Fishy showed in the video that someone can torque it properly without a torque wrench. In the context of what we were talking about, it doesn't.

You, yourself even said, "maybe on your own car." Which is what we were talking about.
Yes Have you yet to see me replace a ripped aluminum rim? they should keep to the topic this is not Harvard or Yale just some Grease monkey shop
 

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Is that more or less a way a person starts insulting one who took a forum members request to use a torque rachet here and bringing

Yes Have you yet to see me replace a ripped aluminum rim? they should keep to the topic this is not Harvard or Yale just some Grease monkey shop
Agreed.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Now I remember the days I snapped Lug nuts, and caliper bolts by tightning. I even snapped rachets, because they were El cheapo's.

those were the days.

AKA roadster days.
 

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Also, while you can usually get away with a short extension between a socket and torque wrench, longer is not better. Anything that increases the distance between the torque head and the socket is increasing the length of the lever, mathematically speaking, and will render, or throw, the applied torque off. While this may not be critical on some things, it can be a disaster on others, such as working on aluminum engines, or in smaller conditions, such as inch-pounds, etc. Or larger ones, such as the lugs on the steering axle of a big truck.

So, when you're at the tire shop, and you see the guy torque down your lugs with a deep well socket and a six-inch extension, Those bolts will not be torqued properly, which is not only improper but can be dangerous. You can prove this yourself. Use that same setup, then remove the extension and re-check.

Sometimes they use "torque sticks". They are about six inches long and look like extensions. They are color-coded and max out at a certain torque rating. I don't completely understand how they work nor do I trust them, but I see them used frequently in tire shops.
 
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