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Has anyone had any experience towing an ATV or approximately 1,200 lbs (trailer is 500lbs, atv is 700lbs) on a newer Honda CRV with a CVT transmission?

I've been skeptical at times but the only other items in the car would be myself (220lbs) and a small bag (10lbs). It's the not the weight that scares me its the long steep inclines of the West Virginia hills during a summer day. I would only be towing the trailer and ATV maybe 4 times a year. The one way trip is 200 miles which is 400 miles round trip. However, I do not want to burn up the transmission.

Thoughts? Could it handle it without damaging the transmission?
 

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I assume you have a 5th Gen. If so there's a tranny high temperature alarm; shown on page 93 of the 2017 manual, although an asterisk notes it's not available on all models. Your dealer should be able to tell you.

The manual page 545 recommends you change your CVT fluid every 25,000 miles when towing. It also notes you shouldn't exceed 65 mph (p. 442)

Various members have queried about reading the CVT fluid temperature with an OBD2 scanner, but I haven't read of anyone being able to do it. The high temp. alarm might be triggered by a switch instead of an analog output.

You could also look at installing a tranny cooler. Here's a link:

 

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Has anyone had any experience towing an ATV or approximately 1,200 lbs (trailer is 500lbs, atv is 700lbs) on a newer Honda CRV with a CVT transmission?

I've been skeptical at times but the only other items in the car would be myself (220lbs) and a small bag (10lbs). It's the not the weight that scares me its the long steep inclines of the West Virginia hills during a summer day. I would only be towing the trailer and ATV maybe 4 times a year. The one way trip is 200 miles which is 400 miles round trip. However, I do not want to burn up the transmission.

Thoughts? Could it handle it without damaging the transmission?
Awfully heavy ATV trailer but beyond that everything said above is exactly right. Follow the owner's manual, if possible get a aftermarket transcooler installed (not sure if available or available through Honda for their CVTs). Since it's below towing and you'll have almost nothing besides you in the car, don't worry too much.

I would try to plan route that has the easiest grades, though may take a bit longer, easier the grade the less strain.

Also DRIVE EASY. Don't concern yourself with keeping up with traffic, hang with the semis when your going up and watch how the heavy ones deal with it, follow their example. Your smaller but your V will he working hard so take extra care in the mountains.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I assume you have a 5th Gen. If so there's a tranny high temperature alarm; shown on page 93 of the 2017 manual, although an asterisk notes it's not available on all models. Your dealer should be able to tell you.

The manual page 545 recommends you change your CVT fluid every 25,000 miles when towing. It also notes you shouldn't exceed 65 mph (p. 442)

Various members have queried about reading the CVT fluid temperature with an OBD2 scanner, but I haven't read of anyone being able to do it. The high temp. alarm might be triggered by a switch instead of an analog output.

You could also look at installing a tranny cooler. Here's a link:


I would strongly recommend NOT guessing/approximating the weight towed. Look in you phone book for “public scales” and have your trailer/load weighed. They can also tell you the tongue weight. Don’t guess at trailer/load weight.

I frequently see 205+F tranny fluid temps (not towing, just running around town) using a ScanGauge II OBD-II reader. IIRC, I observed a high tranny temp of 229F last November traveling to Oklahoma (not towing). My point is, the CVT runs somewhat toasty, compared to a regular auto tranny, even when not towing. I saw a post where a member reported seeing 240F (in the mountains, not towing iirc) and another reported 280F (flatland towing, iirc). Again, somewhat toasty.

As suggested, slow down, drive easy......maybe take take a break or 2, or 3 or 4......to let things cool a bit.

It will be a challenge to install a secondary/auxiliary tranny cooler on a USA CVT because there are no external tranny fluid lines to “tap in to” on the USA CVT. Other countries get external tranny fluid line “taps” on their CVTs AND a optional genuine Honda part secondary/auxiliary cooler, but not the USA (thanks Honda). A special aftermarket “hockey puck” will need to be mounted between the factory CVT “warmer” and the tranny. The aftermarket “hockey puck” has the 2 external tranny fluid lines that a secondary/auxiliary tranny cooler connects to. I’m not saying it can’t be done......just saying it requires more than just slapping on a tranny cooler (like the Derale that was referenced) like you would do on a regular auto tranny.
 
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MMnew..what do you consider a newer crv? I have a 2014 with 180,000 miles and many have been towing stuff. I towed a 1000 pound side by side 325 miles to my place in upstate PA thru the mountains on a 750 pound utility trailer with no issues. I had the overdrive off and running in 3rd gear and traveling 62mph or so. It towed like a champ. I have dragged my quad several times and barely know its there.
 

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We have been towing 1679lbs (motorcycles/trailer across public scales) behind our V6 RAV4 with a 3500lb tow rating. You can definitely tell almost 1700lbs (147lb tongue weight) is back there. I guess the RAV4 towing half of it's tow rating does not do as good as the CRV towing in excess of it’s tow rating.
 

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I guess the RAV4 towing half of it's tow rating does not do as good as the CRV towing in excess of it’s tow rating.

NOPE, it's a manly thing. Their CRVs are kick-butt work-horses - up until they're not.
 

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ATVs are all terrain vehicles. They're smaller than a UTV and are usually meant for a single rider (sometimes 2). ... UTV stands for utility task vehicle)
 
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