Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all!

I looked through a bunch of threads on this forum and am still in question of my vehicle's capabilities to tow.

In May I am moving from Michigan to Boulder Colorado. I am taking my bedroom with me, and that is about it. So king-sized bed, two IKEA floor storage units (25 lbs each), about 100 lbs of clothes, 55 inch TV, and other small amenities.

I am looking to rent a Uhaul 5x9 utility trailer for the move. Its empty weight is 1,240 lbs. I know that Honda recommends only towing 1,500 lbs, but the tow hitch guys (recommended to me as experts) say that they have had people successfully tow about 2,500 with the same vehicle.

Does that sound right?

I know Honda recommends 850lbs of cargo weight including passengers, cargo, and tongue load. It will be me and my girlfriend (300 lbs), and house stuff in the car (400 lbs).

So! My question is, is this trailer good for me? Besides performance while towing, will going over the Honda recommended 1,500 lb tow limit damage my vehicle in any way? What is the TRUE max this CR-V with 4wd can pull with no damage?

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
2014 CRV EX-L FWD
Joined
·
360 Posts
Those tow hitch guys are FOS.
Rent a truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Many folks calculate max towing based on pure math number. re: Internal vehicle passenger weight + internal cargo weight + vehicle hitch weight + empty trailer weight = remaining max weight. Numbers always looks great on the white board. But in reality, many folks forget to include "feels like" when fighting a head wind, "feels like" when pulling up hills and "feels like" attached trailer's wind draft. Some "wind drag" of attached trailers can feel like an additional 500 lbs.

Long mumblings short... If this is a one time move (from point A to Point B), I'd rent a truck. No need to push an I4 engine vehicle towing things - where there's better alternatives. Especially if you plan to keep the vehicle for many more years.

Hope this helps...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
In May I am moving from Michigan to Boulder Colorado.
In a couple of years I won't be far behind--we're leaving the same state for something on that side of the country. Slim chance a possible future employer might be in Boulder but I'm open to anything, especially Utah or Colorado. Only difference is, we have an entire household to move.

Anyway...

An enclosed 5x8 U-haul cargo trailer (enclosed) weighs 900 pounds, if you can stand to lose a foot in dimensions. The 5x10 cargo trailer is 1,250 pounds. I found the open utility trailer you mentioned on their site also.

The weight limit for our CR-Vs is higher in other countries, largely due to legal issues. The problem isn't only acceleration and handling, it is also about stopping all of the extra weight. A trailer with its own braking system is safest, but I don't see U-haul offering that on their rentals. Without any brakes on the trailer, I would stick to what the US owner's manual says and not exceed the 1,500 lb. limit and recommended tongue weight. If something bad happens, you could lose an insurance claim (or get sued by anyone else who is injured) by exceeding the weight limits on the trailer. Sure, it can probably pull up to 2,500 lbs. (I think that might be the limit in other countries), but that doesn't make it a good idea here even with trailer brakes.

Since there are two of you moving, renting a smaller truck and driving the CR-V out there probably makes better sense and causes less grief and worry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
What you plan to move is fine to tow. HOWEVER that Uhaul trail you CANNOT tow. Not only because of it's weight but more importantly it's size. The weight and size combined (enclosed way overly heavy trailers) a CRV can't handle.

Why a 5x9 enclosed weighs that much is beyond me but that's uhaul crap.

This is why I built my own trailer (we are moving to St Louis in June)

Better to just buy a small cheap trailer and wrap everything in tarps/plastic so it doesn't get wet. Done. Sell the trailer when you get there and your not out any money.

These guys don't get the cost of renting a truck to go that far with that little is just a waste.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2014 CRV EX-L FWD
Joined
·
360 Posts
These guys don't get the cost of renting a truck to go that far with that little is just a waste.

What is the cost to repair a burnt out tranny? Or repair body damage due to an inability to stop/ control the load?
Both likely cost much more than an 11 year old CRV is worth.

CRVs are wonderful for moving people and groceries but they are only piddling as a workhorse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
These guys don't get the cost of renting a truck to go that far with that little is just a waste.

What is the cost to repair a burnt out tranny? Or repair body damage due to an inability to stop/ control the load?
Both likely cost much more than an 11 year old CRV is worth.

CRVs are wonderful for moving people and groceries but they are only piddling as a workhorse.
WTH are you smoking?

Replacement transmission, 300-500 plus install. Complete rebuild $2500.

Not sure why you are here if you have no clue what a CRV is capable of. Another one of "it's just for hauling the kids" crap. And it's that, crap.

Plus obviously you havent actually gained an understanding of towing. 500-1000 lbs behind a CRV is nothing is loaded correctly. It's the size of the trailer that's the problem. Can't do a big enclosed trailer.

The couple hundred pounds of stuff he has to haul, go to harbor frieght and buying a trailer for $300 (make sure to grease the bearings when assembling) or buy a used trailer for the same price which is 1/4 or less of what a truck will cost and take what little he moving and not worry about it.

Man I get sick of this "cant do anything because it's a Honda" garbage on here. It's called know the limits, the real limits, do it properly and you'll be perfectly fine.

FYI I tow 1000lbs+ behind my 2003 all the time. Towed 1500lbs plus 150lbs+ of firewood in the hatch. That was about 70 miles round trip and trans wasn't barely above optimal temp. Engine was working but transmission didn't care, that's what a cooler is for along with not driving like an a-hole.

Will be using it to tow my trailer which is about 400lbs plus whatever we put in it for multiple 300 mile trips over the next 2 months moving to Missouri. Not concerned one bit about it holding up. Trailer will probably weigh 600-900 total loaded. Had 300lbs in crap in the trailer the other day (taking junk to the dump) so about 700lbs and CRV could have cared less it was back there.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
I am the second owner of my '07. The p.o. towed one of the aforementioned small U-Haul trailers, with the trailer and the car fully loaded, plus two adults and a baby, 1,500 miles from long Beach to Austin, with no ill effects. This trip was to move Grandma and her stuff. Of course it's possible to easily overload such a setup, but it's also possible to properly balance the load and have a safe trip. A little common sense and restraint will go a long way.
 

·
Registered
2014 CRV EX-L FWD
Joined
·
360 Posts
WTH are you smoking?

Your obvious pride in the V is showing but with age comes experience (two CRVs, one F150, two F250 - V10 then diesel, now a diesel dually F350).
I'm not dissing Honda, IF he had the correct Honda (Pilot, Ridgeline) I'd suggest he continue with this job.

Y'all do as you please but you've been warned; if you exceed the limits you're asking for trouble (maybe a short distance is ok, but not a 1000 mile roadtrip, overloaded, at highway speeds?).
 

·
Registered
2014 CRV EX-L FWD
Joined
·
360 Posts
Of course it's possible to easily overload such a setup, but it's also possible to properly balance the load and have a safe trip.

A properly loaded bumper mounted trailer needs a minimum tongue weight of 10% (ideally up to 15%) of its total weight to be properly loaded.
A lesser load easily leads to trailer sway at highway speeds/ conditions; the small/ lightweight CRV could easily be susceptible to this problem.

My pulling history goes back a bit: I started with a collapsible camper, (1970s, it resulted in a burnt out tranny), a 6' util. trailer and now a 17' one rated for 15K pounds. The first camper led to a 24' one, then a 32' fifth wheel, now a 42' 16K pound fifth. So I speak with experience.
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
Advising caution is never a bad idea, as experience always teaches, so good on you for that. But what am I smoking? I'm a retired truck driver with over five million miles pulling every kind of load with every kind of truck ever made. The only things I never pulled were gasoline, milk, and wet concrete. I am HazMat certified and have hauled cruise missiles, explosives, radioactive, biohazard, and every other class of Hazmat. I heavy hauled around Houston for years, delivering equipment to the refineries. Permit loads, over width and height and length. My youngest son does that now. I taught him how to drive. Used to take him with me on the road when he was a teen. That song "Weed, Whites, and Wine?" That was me. I did it all, and I've seen it all, over the lower 48 and Canada, over a period of forty years or so. Only ever ran over one drunk and one idiot kid. Both survived, both were arrested and charged. So I have some stories too, and some experience.

I also have a woodshop, and an F250, and a 16' trailer. The heaviest machine I've had in my shop was a 2,800 pound AWWM Universal Saw Table, made c. 1905. That big old stuff is mostly all gone now and I have a mostly early Powermatic, Delta, and Walker Turner shop. The only heavy machine I have now is a 2,200 pound Cleveland vertical mill, as I've added some knifemaking capability.

So I think I'm fairly qualified to give a little towing advice. My CR-V is not an off-road vehicle, nor is it a truck. But it does have a Class 3 hitch, and I can do some stuff with it. Already have. It's pretty capable, within its limits.
 

·
Registered
2014 CRV EX-L FWD
Joined
·
360 Posts
"It's pretty capable, within its limits."

I concur - the V is capable within its limits - but the original poster was asking for input about using his V outside of the limits.

As proposed he would be towing overloaded (1000 miles at interstate speeds); I'm not going to encourage this potential disaster just because someone said it could be accomplished.
 

·
Registered
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
I agree that caution is in order, but I also know that my CR-V pulled a similar load farther with no issues and no damage to the car. So I may stop short of highly recommending it, but I won't say it can't be done, using common sense and appropriate caution. YMMV. If you haven't recently checked truck rental prices, you should. They have increased by a ridiculous and unwarranted, IMO, amount in the last couple of years, and there is no way I would ever pay what they want now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all for the input!
I think we have decided to take two vehicles, and just take what we can fit in the V and a GMC Terrain. We will then just buy a bed and furniture out there. After the cost of renting a trailer, installing a hitch on the V, and dealing with the hassle of towing for 1,400 miles I think that will be the best bet.
I do appreciate the input, as I'd like to know my ability to tow some small stuff in the future!
 

·
Registered
2014 CRV EX-L FWD
Joined
·
360 Posts
I don't know the specs but I suspect the GMC Terrain (as a larger car) could safely tow that load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
"It's pretty capable, within its limits."

I concur - the V is capable within its limits - but the original poster was asking for input about using his V outside of the limits.

As proposed he would be towing overloaded (1000 miles at interstate speeds); I'm not going to encourage this potential disaster just because someone said it could be accomplished.
I did state he couldn't use a uhaul trailer. That's too much. But a little basic trailer which is about $500 at most and the stuff he wanted to bring would no where near overload his CRV.

But didn't know he didn't have a hitch or anything else, that adds hassle and expenses.

Your right I do have some pride in my V. But I have also towed, hauled and so on with about everything from a 80k lb rig down to an s10 pickup. There is a lot to pay attention to especially when towing with a smaller vehicle. But 1000lbs behind a CRV is nothing as long as the CRV isn't loaded with 4 ppl and packed full of crap.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I just towed a 3,000 pound, 6’x12’ trailer from Portland to Alaska with my 2008 CR-V and I want to add some anecdotal data to this conversation.

I believe that the only reason I was able to successfully tow such a heavy, resistive load without apparently damaging my car is by using an App on my phone that monitors car conditions from the OBD II data port. The app I used was OBD Fusion and I used it to closely monitor the Transmission temperature. I’ll make another post about how to monitor the temperature of the CVT Tranny, but by driving the car hard (without the trailer) in 90 degree heat in Arizona I determined that CVT Temps frequently were in the 280 deg F range wiith incursions up to 300 deg F. I have no other basis for that but I treated 280 as “normal hot” and 300 as (overheated, pull over). The tranny once got as hot as 307 without any warning lights coming on.

One decision I made was to put electric brakes on the trailer with a proportional brake controller. On dry pavement, I could have gotten away without the brakes, maybe- but I consider it a necessary precaution and I was very pleased with how it handled.

The first thing I noticed after picking up the 1,300 lb empty trailer was the extreme wind resistance caused by a 6x12 by 8 foot tall trailer. 60 mph was a max speed on flat requiring about 100 HP (compared to 35 HP untrailered. I could drop to about 60 HP and access 4th gear (OD) by dropping my speed to 50 mph.

After loading 1500 lb of construction supplies in Portland the car was notably sluggish especially at stoplights. I discovered that by default the CRV starts in something like 2nd gear, and by manually shifting to 1st gear it seemed that I reduced the strain on the transmission. Basically I drove it like a stick shift at intersections.

To summarize the drive North I discovered that cold air temps helped a lot. When air intake temp was 50 deg F I could push the car much harder than when intake was 85 F. On flat ground my cruising speed was 50 mph and I found that by keeping Engine Torque below about 70 foot-lb I could maintain CVT temps within range. Even at moderate grade I would overheat in 4th gear so I mostly turned OD off causing Engine RPM to be in the 4,000 range, but torque dropped. Average fuel mileage was about 14 mpg (compared to 25 without a trailer). On any incline my speed would drop to 40 mph or slower as I tried to keep my Torque below 100 foot lb. The steepest, longest hill in the Canadian Rockies required me to pull over twice to let the Tranny cool, other than that both times I overheated it was due to driving in OD instead of 3rd gear.

In Alaska, without the trailer, the car drives great and the tranny fluid is still red and clean. I’m sure I put excessive wear on the Tranny, but there is no sign of damage.

I’ll post more on how to monitor the tranny temp

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
The 2008 CR-V doesn't have a CVT. Were you referring to another model year perhaps (2018)? I don't know if our older CR-Vs have the ability to monitor transmission temperature, but it would be handy to have (especially if towing).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
The 2008 CR-V doesn't have a CVT. Were you referring to another model year perhaps (2018)? I don't know if our older CR-Vs have the ability to monitor transmission temperature, but it would be handy to have (especially if towing).
Thanks. It looks like you are right about that. It’s a 5-speed automatic and it does have the ability to monitor something that I’m pretty sure is related to Transmission Temp.

In OBD Fusion I entered a user defined PID to return transmission Temp in Deg C using the following parameters:

Module/Header - ALL
OBD Mode - 22
PID Number - 2201
Equation - AA

I converted it to Deg F with scale factor of 1.8 and an Offset of 32.

I derived that information from the Honda Piloteers forum

https://www.piloteers.org/forums/98...on-temperature-monitoring.html#/topics/155273

I am relatively confident that it is measuring something related to Transmission Temp because

a) at startup it reads the same temp as the Engine

b) it doesn’t ever show signs of having thermostatically controlled cooling. If the Temp is rising it keeps rising asymptotically to a stable temp. It doesn’t seem to engage a cooling cycle

c) heavy load causes it to heat quickly

d) downshifting causes it to heat much less or even cool at the same speed

e). It cools very slowly at idle or Engine Off, suggesting a lot of mass
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top