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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Yep, same brand/model/size/etc. Only difference was a few months of driving, resulting in the different amounts of tread left.

It seems that 2/32 is about the maximum difference recommended, and maybe highway speeds in high heat make it worse? We've been on vacation in a different car, so I haven't driven it since. I did check the air, and all the cold tire pressures were down to 31.5 after an unexpected (and pleasant) dip into the 50s last night. But at least all the tires were the same.
 

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Was the replacement tire not the same brand, model, and size tire? If not then yes that will be an issue.
Whether it's tread pattern or some other characteristic of the tire's structural design, the revolutions per mile for tires of the same size from different manufacturers can vary slightly. For this reason, you could get a false TPMS warning even if remaining tread depth and air pressure are identical across all the mismatched tires.
 

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Yep, same brand/model/size/etc. Only difference was a few months of driving, resulting in the different amounts of tread left.

It seems that 2/32 is about the maximum difference recommended, and maybe highway speeds in high heat make it worse? We've been on vacation in a different car, so I haven't driven it since. I did check the air, and all the cold tire pressures were down to 31.5 after an unexpected (and pleasant) dip into the 50s last night. But at least all the tires were the same.
I know for a fact 2/32 difference between tires will not cause the TPMS to chronically trigger. 2/32 is about the most I personally would let the difference between tires become. Note: sometimes tire shops will simply spin down some tread on a new tire to match it to old tires, from owner reports.

Now, if there was an abnormal tread wear issue on one tire, that in effect over time distorted the traction and handling quality of a tire... that might cause the TPMS some grief. But this is speculation on my part as I have personally not experienced this because I generally never have abnormal tread wear issues.

If a tire was out of round or had some other manufacturing defect that might also drive the TPMS nuts. Thing is, when this is the case, you generally also will hear some abnormal road noise from the tires interacting with the road surface. So you have audio indication from the tires in the form of excessive road noise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the insight! I thought about shaving the tires but decided that was just one other variable introduced to the mix. The easy solution is probably four new tires, but with 6-8/32 left, it seems like a waste of nearly half the tread life.

It's hard because the TPMS is not triggering "chronically," only on hot days at highway speeds. (I think you noted this difficulty earlier in the thread.) I've driven it around this week (admittedly cooler weather) for a few errands without any issues. No sign of road noise at those speeds, and I definitely didn't hear any when the light was on previously. I'll probably have a chance to take it early next week and see how it does. I just wish I had more confidence in the dealer's reassurance that there's nothing wrong.

EDIT: Three tires at 33.5, one (in the sun) at 34.0 psi. No sign of leaking air.
 

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Thanks for all the insight! I thought about shaving the tires but decided that was just one other variable introduced to the mix. The easy solution is probably four new tires, but with 6-8/32 left, it seems like a waste of nearly half the tread life.

It's hard because the TPMS is not triggering "chronically," only on hot days at highway speeds. (I think you noted this difficulty earlier in the thread.) I've driven it around this week (admittedly cooler weather) for a few errands without any issues. No sign of road noise at those speeds, and I definitely didn't hear any when the light was on previously. I'll probably have a chance to take it early next week and see how it does. I just wish I had more confidence in the dealer's reassurance that there's nothing wrong.

EDIT: Three tires at 33.5, one (in the sun) at 34.0 psi. No sign of leaking air.
It is possible that one of the wheel speed sensors is a bit flaky. There have been a few reports of that being the cause of random somewhat chronic TPMS alerts. But if there are not stored codes (honda specific OBDII codes) in the vehicles OBDII logs, not much point in working this angle until you get persistent solid repeat failures. Bringing an intermittent issue to a dealership is real hit and miss unless there are stored codes they can rely on to validate an issue they cannot actually recreate at the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Happened again today, driving on a highway in nice mild 75 degree weather. I haven't yet checked pressures since I just got off the road, but I'll do that tomorrow. I think I'll take it to the local Goodyear shop since the experience at the dealer was so unsatisfactory.
 

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Happened again today, driving on a highway in nice mild 75 degree weather. I haven't yet checked pressures since I just got off the road, but I'll do that tomorrow. I think I'll take it to the local Goodyear shop since the experience at the dealer was so unsatisfactory.
You may have a flaky wheel rotation sensor. It has been reported by a few owners as cause for persistent TPMS issues. Goodyear will likely not be able to find such an issue, nor replace the sensor if that is what is at the root cause.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I didn't take it to the dealer because he insisted it was low pressure due to the colder temperatures overnight, even though I tried to explain that the problem has been ongoing for six weeks and that the light came on when the temperature was in the mid 70s after driving on the highway for 20 miles. I did take it to Goodyear, which didn't find any leaks in the tire and didn't think the wear on the wheel was enough to cause the issue.

So I reset the pressures to 33 and reset the TPMS, fine for a week, until the same tonight: driving on the highway for about 20 miles, the light came on about two miles south of where it did the previous week. I checked pressures when I got home: 35 on both front wheels, 34.5 on both rear wheels.

The only thing I can think of is either a flaky sensor or some kind of tire issue, whether it's the alignment or a slight difference in tread or some combination of the two. But it seems like tire places can't diagnose those and the dealer doesn't seem to want to.
 

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My instinct says a sensor issue and not a tire/wheel issue. You set all tires to 33 cold, then a week later drove 20 miles and added some heat, so the fronts increased to 35 and the rears increased to 34.5. This is exaclty what I would expect and should not cause any problem in and of itself. You don't have a slow leak in one tire causing the problem. It would seem there are no leaks whatsoever.

Therefore, you either have a faulty sensor, or the sensors are accurately reporting a difference in rotation speed between two or more of your tires. My gut tells me it's probably the latter.

You previously mentioned your tires have 6/32 inch to 8/32 inch remaining tread. There have been a lot of comments lately saying that a 2/32 inch difference will not trigger TPMS, but maybe you have hyper sensitive sensors. It might be helpful to know exactly which tires have how much tread remaining. For example, if you have one at 6/32, one at 8/32, and two at 7/32, that's different than having three tires that match and one that's different. In the latter situation, the one tire that's different should be on the rear of the vehicle. In the former situation, both 7/32 tires should be on the same side of the vehicle to minimize the difference between left and right tires on each axle.

The tires with less tread remaining have a smaller circumference, thereby requiring them to rotate more revolutions per mile than the tires with a larger circumference. I'd try overinflating the tires with less remaining tread by 3-5 PSI compared to the tires with more tread (or, alternatively, if you have only one tire with more tread and the other three match, deflate the one with more tread - there's no TPMS sensor within each individual wheel, so you're manipulating the indirect system without any risk of setting off a warning as in a direct system). Drive around for 5-10 miles and see if that solves the problem. If you can pinpoint this as the cause and repeat the behavior (i.e., test it out by restoring uniform pressure across all four tires, replicate the problem in that condition, then eliminate the problem again by again overinflating the tires with less tread), then you know the problem is not a faulty sensor, but a slightly overactive sensor. The solution in this scenario is to either find a tire shop that will shave down some tread to get all four tires to exactly the same matching tread depth, or simply buy a new set of four tires.

Another thought is that if you have a significant alignment problem, combined with 2/32 inch tread difference, the combination could amplify a difference in rotation speed. You can try moving individual tires to different positions on the vehicle and see if that makes any difference. Depending how much time and effort you want to put into this, you can spend hours or days experimenting with tires on different positions on the vehicle and with various pressures in each tire. That's if you really don't want to spend any money. The quick and lazy way to diagnose this problem is to throw money at it by buying 4 new tires, paying for a wheel alignment, and hoping that solves the problem completely. If it comes back after, you know you have a faulty sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Depending how much time and effort you want to put into this, you can spend hours or days experimenting with tires on different positions on the vehicle and with various pressures in each tire. That's if you really don't want to spend any money. The quick and lazy way to diagnose this problem is to throw money at it by buying 4 new tires, paying for a wheel alignment, and hoping that solves the problem completely. If it comes back after, you know you have a faulty sensor.
Thanks for such a thoughtful answer. It's sporadic, but there's a definite pattern of either (1) long highway driving or (2) short highway driving in high temperatures, so a random sensor blip seems less likely than SOMETHING triggering the sensor, even if unnecessarily. (I was also told that if it were the sensor, the ABS light would come on. I'm not completely sure that's true, but it hasn't.)

The 7/32 tires are both on the passenger side, with the 8/32 in the front and the 6/32 in the rear on the driver side. I'll definitely try slightly underinflating the 8/32 tire and maybe slightly overinflating the 6/32 tire, and I might try re-rotating the tires (the problem started after the last rotation at 35000 miles) to see if that helps, but I agree that the easy solution is to buy the new tires. Given the amount of time involved in testing everything, and that time is "money," it might be the less expensive choice, too!
 

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I was thinking a little more about what I posted earlier saying both 7/32 tires should be on the same side. What I should have said is they should be on different axles, so each 7/32 tire is paired on the same axle with another tire with only 1/32 difference on the same axle. HOWEVER, having the 8/32 and 6/32 tires both on the same side of the vehicle might be exactly what's triggering the warning. I don't know how the system is set up, so I'm only guessing here, but it wouldn't surprise me if the difference in rotational speed from front to rear wheel on the same side might be given more priority by the engineers who designed the system. It makes sense that the rear left wheel should have almost no difference in rotational speed compared to the front left tire that it's following. Compared to the other side of the vehicle, you should have identical rotational speed between front and rear since those tires are both 7/32.

Therefore, the first thing I would try is to get the 8/32 and 6/32 tires as far away from each other as possible by swapping the rear tires only from side to side. Then the only major significant difference in rotational speed will be between two wheels that are separated diagonally. Considering the two tires in question only have a 2/32 difference in tread, the difference in rotational speed between front left and rear right might be interpreted differently by the indirect TPMS speed sensors, and there very well could be a greater allowance for a larger difference in rotational speed, in turn, preventing the system from going off. Even if you don't want to bother trying anything else, it's one thing I would definitely try before replacing all four tires.

Also, have you ever had an alignment done? Being a 2016, it shouldn't be subject to whatever problem has been affecting a small percentage of the 5th generation units getting delivered misaligned from the factory, but if you've never had one done in six years and 35,000 miles, it wouldn't be a bad idea to throw $100 at it and see what happens. Definitely get a printout from the shop with before and after specs so you can compare and we can analyze.

Another possibility is if you have any friends with a 4th or 5th generation CR-V with four identical tires, you could borrow their wheels for a brief test run. I don't know how practical that would be for you, because then you'd have to switch all of them back to the other vehicle after you're done. If you can switch all the tires yourself, that's one thing, but if you have to take it to a shop every time you want to move a wheel around, that can get tiresome very quickly. Maybe you can find a small shop where you can just tip the guys who actually do the work of moving wheels around for you and not have to pay the shop.
 

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Thanks for such a thoughtful answer. It's sporadic, but there's a definite pattern of either (1) long highway driving or (2) short highway driving in high temperatures, so a random sensor blip seems less likely than SOMETHING triggering the sensor, even if unnecessarily. (I was also told that if it were the sensor, the ABS light would come on. I'm not completely sure that's true, but it hasn't.)

The 7/32 tires are both on the passenger side, with the 8/32 in the front and the 6/32 in the rear on the driver side. I'll definitely try slightly underinflating the 8/32 tire and maybe slightly overinflating the 6/32 tire, and I might try re-rotating the tires (the problem started after the last rotation at 35000 miles) to see if that helps, but I agree that the easy solution is to buy the new tires. Given the amount of time involved in testing everything, and that time is "money," it might be the less expensive choice, too!
I seem to recall you mentioning that it tends to trigger in roughly the same parts of the highway you are driving on. Am I correct?

If so.. please be aware that odd surface or bumps in the road can trigger false positives on the passive TPMS. I have had this happen a couple of times on my 2017, both times on the same part of highway road I was traveling on. What happens is one wheel suddenly begins moving faster (or slower) than the other wheels for a moment, which is enough to trigger a TPMS alert before the traction control system kicks in (if it kicks in... sometimes it ignores transients).

Not saying your issue is a road induced transient for sure, but it is worth evaluating as a cause.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I seem to recall you mentioning that it tends to trigger in roughly the same parts of the highway you are driving on. Am I correct?

If so.. please be aware that odd surface or bumps in the road can trigger false positives on the passive TPMS. I have had this happen a couple of times on my 2017, both times on the same part of highway road I was traveling on. What happens is one wheel suddenly begins moving faster (or slower) than the other wheels for a moment, which is enough to trigger a TPMS alert before the traction control system kicks in (if it kicks in... sometimes it ignores transients).

Not saying your issue is a road induced transient for sure, but it is worth evaluating as a cause.
Thanks again to everyone for chiming in.

1) It's now the same place on two different highways, so I think it's not the physical condition of the road so much as the amount of time I've been driving when I get to those spots and the increased pressure in the tires there.

2) I bought the car certified pre-owned, and I don't think I've done an alignment, so I should check if one was done previously. I'd say 35K is a legitimate distance for having one done.

3) I'll try the rotation of one pair of tires. I thought the dealer said the measurements are more important on each axle than side to side, but either I could have misunderstood him or he could have misspoken. I suppose it's possible they failed to rotate one of the pairs at the last oil change. That would not only account for the sudden onset of this issue but also the fact that the tires with both the least and most wear are on the same side of the car. (I did check: the dealer does straight side to side rotation, rather than the modified X.)
 

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Thanks again to everyone for chiming in.

1) It's now the same place on two different highways, so I think it's not the physical condition of the road so much as the amount of time I've been driving when I get to those spots and the increased pressure in the tires there.

2) I bought the car certified pre-owned, and I don't think I've done an alignment, so I should check if one was done previously. I'd say 35K is a legitimate distance for having one done.

3) I'll try the rotation of one pair of tires. I thought the dealer said the measurements are more important on each axle than side to side, but either I could have misunderstood him or he could have misspoken. I suppose it's possible they failed to rotate one of the pairs at the last oil change. That would not only account for the sudden onset of this issue but also the fact that the tires with both the least and most wear are on the same side of the car. (I did check: the dealer does straight side to side rotation, rather than the modified X.)
Whenever my vehicles are due for a tire rotation, they get rotated front-to-back. I mark the inside of my front tires with chalk, and I check to insure the chalk marks on the rear tires when it is returned to me. :) I mark the right side different than the left side too.. to insure they did not do any cross rotations.

Prudent and easy to quickly allow me to insure they actually performed the correct rotation. I also check the oil level before I leave the dealership too... just to be sure they did not under or over fill it.
 

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I use paint dots on mine so I can follow all four tires exactly. Unless I have some reason not to do this, I use a rear crossward pattern, rear to front on same size, front moved to rear opposite side. It allows the tires whose direction is reversed to warm up to the new spinning direction with less pressure by being on the rear. Then by the time they move the front on the subsequent rotation, they're happy to continue in the same direction on the front, where they'll have to do harder work. That's why I was so mad in 2013 when a Nissan dealer rotated my tires without permission, among other reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
These are good hints for the future. Thank you. I made notes of which tire was where. I wonder whether they only go left to right on mine because of the age/tread difference so that the better tires are on the front (odd for AWD, but maybe?).

Anyway, I set the pressures differently in the tires, with the highest (34) in the 6/32, medium (33) in both 7/32, and the lowest (32) in the 8/32. I do think I felt a bit "uneven" while starting out but maybe it was in my head. With the cooler weather, I don't expect to see the light come on until I spend more time highway driving on Thursday. I'd love to be able to just take it out and test it, but alas that's not something I can do right now.

EDIT: I spoke too soon! Driving home today, in maybe 80 degree weather, for less than five miles of highway driving, the TPMS light came on. I'll do either the alignment or rotation next, but it may be a week or so as work is hectic right now.

EDIT 2: I checked the tires after three hours. The numbers were 35.5 in the 6, 35 in the 7, and 34 in the 8/32. So it was still pretty close to the proportions I had added.

EDIT 3: Obviously, I had an alignment when I installed the new tires in October 2019 (duh). I haven't had one since (~12K miles), although my recollection is that Honda always checks it as part of the standard service.
 
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