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I have a 2018 Honda CR-V and with only 7,756 miles had a tire with a nail and had to replace this hardly used tire. I purchased a Firestone tire of the identical size of the original tire. Since that date (over 2 months ago) and placed nearly 900 miles on the SUV, I cannot get more than 5-6 miles without the TPMS sensor light coming on. I have talked with 2 Honda dealers near Huntsville, AL and their only suggestion is to BUY all new tires. Is this what Honda expects when you have only 8k miles on the tires? If this is the NEW Honda standard than I will need to switch to a different vehicle brand for future purchases.
 

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I have a 2018 Honda CR-V and with only 7,756 miles had a tire with a nail and had to replace this hardly used tire. I purchased a Firestone tire of the identical size of the original tire. Since that date (over 2 months ago) and placed nearly 900 miles on the SUV, I cannot get more than 5-6 miles without the TPMS sensor light coming on. I have talked with 2 Honda dealers near Huntsville, AL and their only suggestion is to BUY all new tires. Is this what Honda expects when you have only 8k miles on the tires? If this is the NEW Honda standard than I will need to switch to a different vehicle brand for future purchases.
Your original tires were not Firestone though.. right?

The one time I lost a tire due to a sidewall puncture... my tire dealer (America's Tire) advised that I only replace it with the exact same make and model tire. The other 3 tires were all relatively new, so putting a new tire of the same make and model number was no issue at all. If the tires had been older and below 2/3 tire tread, the tire dealer would mostly likely have advised replacing the puncture and it's mate on the other wheel.

The reason is that Hondas (more companies are doing this as well.. so switching brands won't make you immune) use wheel rotation measurements (not actual in tire tire pressure sensors) to detect if one tire is rotating slower then the others (ie: slower rotation due to low tire pressure). My tire dealer explained that if you put a tire on with a different tread pattern and tire parameters (even if it is a size match) you can end up with different driving characteristics on that particular tire.
 

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The RT4WD/AWD system in the CR-V also expects the tires to all be the same size/circumference.

I ran over something in my 2014 CR-V which destroyed the front right tire.
The dealer replaced it with a new tire of the same make and model and size they took off one of the CR-Vs in their lot and I haven't had any problems since then.
 

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With the ABS sensor to detect TPMS - tires need to be replaced in pairs - 400 miles difference in the tread is enough to cause the ABS algorithm to believe that a tire is low.
Contrary - you do not need to replace all 4 - even with AWD - it is the pair on the same axle that have to be the same size.
I do not recommend different brands on the front and rear - the braking can go wrong if you do if one set of tires grabs the road better than the other.
 

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Contrary - you do not need to replace all 4 - even with AWD - it is the pair on the same axle that have to be the same size.
I believe you are wrong with this statement.
The RT4WD/AWD system activates based on the difference in rotational speed between the front and rear axles.
Different sized tires may cause the system to activate, and never turn off, which would cause problems with the system.
 

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I replaced a non repairable tire with 10000 miles on it. Same manufacture as original tires. No problems. This was on a 2014 EX-L 2 WD. I don't see a problem as long as manufacture/size are same as other tires.
 

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Actually, the TPMS system on the newer Hondas (after 2014-15) no longer use a discrete sensor as they did previously. So, if 3 of the tires are sending the same rotational speed but one is sending a higher rotational speed, the system concludes that this tire is low on air pressure and turns on the light. If you have different tires on the front vs. rear but both front and rear axles have the same tire brands (front & rear are different but same brand & size on each axle) the TPMS light could still turn on if it sees different rotational speeds from front axle vs. rear axle. After all, if you had all 4 same tires but both tires on one axle were low on air, it would have to turn the light on.

The key is that after all the tires have been properly inflated, you need to reset the system (unfortunately the process requires driving the vehicle for 15-20 miles is it? I forgot exactly what the process was, but I recall something to that effect after you put it into the "recalibrate" mode. See your owner's manual.) I recall an incident where our guys did an oil change on a 2015 Fit and found the tires to be at 50 psi each! They thought they did the owner a favor by dropping it to the factory specs (33 psi?) and later that day, the guy came back complaining that his TPMS light came on after driving down the road a few miles. Without the discrete sensors, this is what happens as the TPMS system doesn't know what the pressures are; it just bases it's decision on comparing the rotational speed of the tires now vs. what it was programmed to see as "normal".
 

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if you can get the same brand and model / tread pattern as the other 3 tires would be the correct thing to do that odd ball shouldn't be on there a lot of times from brand to brand and model of tires the outside diameter is 1/4" different not good on an AWD or any car really but especially AWD , but here's some tpms info, you can try the calibration by holding the tpms for 3 seconds or something here's a pdf from honda but sounds like they tried this already,if its off that much from the other 3 tires it may have saved you some expensive repairs 10k miles down the road like differential and transfer case,PDF below for calibration reset
 

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check this out I was interested in the different outside diameter between the OE hankook and the firestone the Firestone is 29.1 OD and the Hankook is 29.5 OD so .4 of an inch different,that's not good
135927
135928
The (Kinergy GT is Hankook's Grand Touring All-Season tire originally developed for Original Equipment use on vehicles from Honda) so your OE Hankook may say Grand touring but is identical to the Kinergy GT and is what you will buy and get rid of that firestone you may be able to get Firestone to take it back they shouldn't have put that on, all this info is on tire rack .com
 

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Hello,
Below is some information on this topic, I posted in another discussion that I believe will help here as well.

Cheers!



Here is a partial reprint from a Honda Job Aid published in September 2017 (Version 2) to help clear up some misunderstandings and conjecture I see going about indirect TPMS.

Indirect TPMS Calibration

INTRODUCTION

Indirect TPMS, first introduced in the 2013 Accord, provides the same function as direct TPMS but does it differently.

Here is what it covers:
  • A Few Basics
  • Calibration
  • Low Tire Pressure/TPMS Indicator Functions
  • Calibration Comparison Logic
A FEW BASICS
Unlike a direct TPMS, an indirect TPMS does not use tire pressure sensors mounted in the tires. Instead, the system is integrated into the VSA modulator-control unit and uses the following inputs to monitor and compare tire characteristics while driving and determine when one or more tires are significantly underinflated.
  • VSA/ABS wheel speed sensors
  • Yaw and G sensor
  • Brake pressure
  • Steering angle
  • Outside temperature (measured from the front bumper)
From these inputs, the system calculates tire pressures. To determine tire pressure loss, the system uses these two methods:
  • Wheel Speed Differential - This method is used to detect if one, two, or three tires have lost pressure. It compares the two left tires to the two right tires, the two front tires to the two rear tires, and the left front and right rear tires to the left rear and right front tires.
  • Peak Tire Resonance - This method is used to detect if all four tires have lost pressure. A good example: if the tire pressures have not been checked for over 9 months.
An easy way to tell which type of TPMS a vehicle has is by looking at the valve stems. Vehicles with indirect TPMS have black rubber valve stems. Vehicles with direct TPMS have gray alloy valve stems.

CALIBRATION
In order to calculate tire pressures, the system must first be calibrated. The system relies on the tire pressures being set to the cold inflation values listed on the driver’s doorjamb label and the calibration process started. This process must be done at PDI, and also at scheduled maintenance and anytime you do the following:
  • Adjust pressure in one or more tires
  • Rotate tires
  • Replace one or more tires
Keep in mind if the Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator is not on, you just need to start the process; the system will finish it on its own as the customer drives the vehicle.

If the tire pressures are not properly set and/or the calibration process is not started at the right time, the tire pressure calculations are tricked, causing the Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator to possibly come on, resulting in a possible customer comeback and wasted troubleshooting time.
Starting calibration is very easy. Here is how it is done. You will also find these procedures in the PDI bulletins, owner’s guides, owner’s manuals, and service information.
Before You Start
  1. Make sure the vehicle is completely stopped with the transmission in Neutral (M/T) or Park (A/T or CVT).
  2. Make sure all of the tires are the same type and size. The system will not work right otherwise.
  3. Set the tire pressures to the cold inflation values listed on the driver’s doorjamb label.
  4. Turn the ignition to ON.
  5. See the owners manual on how to start TPMS calibration on the specific vehicle you are working on.
NOTE: The above steps vary, depending on the vehicle and how it is equipped.

CALIBRATION COMPARISON LOGIC
Whenever calibration is started, the TPMS control unit learns the tire characteristics during the calibration drive. Should those characteristics change for any reason from what it has learned (for example, there is a sudden drop in tire pressure), the Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator comes on as a reminder to check the tire pressures.
If the tire pressures are properly set and calibration is started, the indicator goes off, the control unit learns the proper tire characteristics during the calibration drive, and all is well. But what if nothing is done about the tire pressures, but calibration is started? The indicator will still go off, but now something called calibration comparison logic steps in.

The control unit then compares the tire characteristics that caused the indicator to come on to the tire characteristics during the calibration drive. If the control unit sees that there has been no change in tire characteristics, the indicator comes on again within 20 minutes as a reminder to check the tire pressures.

It is not uncommon for customers to experience this situation and, when they do, they are often confused and think there is something wrong with the TPMS and end up back at their dealership. Here is common a scenario:

The Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator comes on while driving. The customer, not wanting to stop and check tire pressures, starts calibration knowing it will turn off the indicator. The control unit’s calibration comparison logic sees there is no change in tire characteristics since the last calibration and the indicator comes on again within 20 minutes.

The truth is this scenario can easily be avoided by simply heeding the indicator and taking proper action (setting the tire pressures and starting calibration).

LOW TIRE PRESSURE/TPMS INDICATOR FUNCTIONS
The Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator does a variety of things, depending on conditions and circumstances.

Normal Conditions
  • The indicator comes on for a few seconds when you turn the ignition to ON. This is just part of the system check.
  • The indicator comes on for 2 seconds, then goes off, if the vehicle is not moved within 45 seconds after turning the ignition to ON. This just means the system is still calibrating.
Abnormal Conditions
  • The indicator comes on and stays on if one or more tire pressures are very low or the system has not been calibrated. If this happens, the vehicle should be stopped in a safe place, the tire pressures checked and adjusted as needed, and the calibration process started.
  • The indicator blinks for about 1 minute, then stays on if the compact spare tire is mounted or there is a problem with the TPMS.
    If the spare is mounted, the regular tire should be repaired or replaced and mounted as soon as possible, and the calibration process started. If the spare is not mounted, the calibration process should be started and the system checked.
 

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I have a 2018 Honda CR-V and with only 7,756 miles had a tire with a nail and had to replace this hardly used tire. I purchased a Firestone tire of the identical size of the original tire. Since that date (over 2 months ago) and placed nearly 900 miles on the SUV, I cannot get more than 5-6 miles without the TPMS sensor light coming on. I have talked with 2 Honda dealers near Huntsville, AL and their only suggestion is to BUY all new tires. Is this what Honda expects when you have only 8k miles on the tires? If this is the NEW Honda standard than I will need to switch to a different vehicle brand for future purchases.
I've had the same experience with other vehicles. Nit sure if it's the different brand of tires, the fact that the tires are not the same, a bad sensor, or an incompatible sensor installed. But, I had a permanently lit TPMS light on the dash of my Nissan after I had new tires installed.
 

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Hello,
Below is some information on this topic, I posted in another discussion that I believe will help here as well.

Cheers!



Here is a partial reprint from a Honda Job Aid published in September 2017 (Version 2) to help clear up some misunderstandings and conjecture I see going about indirect TPMS.

Indirect TPMS Calibration

INTRODUCTION

Indirect TPMS, first introduced in the 2013 Accord, provides the same function as direct TPMS but does it differently.

Here is what it covers:
  • A Few Basics
  • Calibration
  • Low Tire Pressure/TPMS Indicator Functions
  • Calibration Comparison Logic
A FEW BASICS
Unlike a direct TPMS, an indirect TPMS does not use tire pressure sensors mounted in the tires. Instead, the system is integrated into the VSA modulator-control unit and uses the following inputs to monitor and compare tire characteristics while driving and determine when one or more tires are significantly underinflated.
  • VSA/ABS wheel speed sensors
  • Yaw and G sensor
  • Brake pressure
  • Steering angle
  • Outside temperature (measured from the front bumper)
From these inputs, the system calculates tire pressures. To determine tire pressure loss, the system uses these two methods:
  • Wheel Speed Differential - This method is used to detect if one, two, or three tires have lost pressure. It compares the two left tires to the two right tires, the two front tires to the two rear tires, and the left front and right rear tires to the left rear and right front tires.
  • Peak Tire Resonance - This method is used to detect if all four tires have lost pressure. A good example: if the tire pressures have not been checked for over 9 months.
An easy way to tell which type of TPMS a vehicle has is by looking at the valve stems. Vehicles with indirect TPMS have black rubber valve stems. Vehicles with direct TPMS have gray alloy valve stems.

CALIBRATION
In order to calculate tire pressures, the system must first be calibrated. The system relies on the tire pressures being set to the cold inflation values listed on the driver’s doorjamb label and the calibration process started. This process must be done at PDI, and also at scheduled maintenance and anytime you do the following:
  • Adjust pressure in one or more tires
  • Rotate tires
  • Replace one or more tires
Keep in mind if the Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator is not on, you just need to start the process; the system will finish it on its own as the customer drives the vehicle.

If the tire pressures are not properly set and/or the calibration process is not started at the right time, the tire pressure calculations are tricked, causing the Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator to possibly come on, resulting in a possible customer comeback and wasted troubleshooting time.
Starting calibration is very easy. Here is how it is done. You will also find these procedures in the PDI bulletins, owner’s guides, owner’s manuals, and service information.
Before You Start
  1. Make sure the vehicle is completely stopped with the transmission in Neutral (M/T) or Park (A/T or CVT).
  2. Make sure all of the tires are the same type and size. The system will not work right otherwise.
  3. Set the tire pressures to the cold inflation values listed on the driver’s doorjamb label.
  4. Turn the ignition to ON.
  5. See the owners manual on how to start TPMS calibration on the specific vehicle you are working on.
NOTE: The above steps vary, depending on the vehicle and how it is equipped.

CALIBRATION COMPARISON LOGIC
Whenever calibration is started, the TPMS control unit learns the tire characteristics during the calibration drive. Should those characteristics change for any reason from what it has learned (for example, there is a sudden drop in tire pressure), the Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator comes on as a reminder to check the tire pressures.
If the tire pressures are properly set and calibration is started, the indicator goes off, the control unit learns the proper tire characteristics during the calibration drive, and all is well. But what if nothing is done about the tire pressures, but calibration is started? The indicator will still go off, but now something called calibration comparison logic steps in.

The control unit then compares the tire characteristics that caused the indicator to come on to the tire characteristics during the calibration drive. If the control unit sees that there has been no change in tire characteristics, the indicator comes on again within 20 minutes as a reminder to check the tire pressures.

It is not uncommon for customers to experience this situation and, when they do, they are often confused and think there is something wrong with the TPMS and end up back at their dealership. Here is common a scenario:

The Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator comes on while driving. The customer, not wanting to stop and check tire pressures, starts calibration knowing it will turn off the indicator. The control unit’s calibration comparison logic sees there is no change in tire characteristics since the last calibration and the indicator comes on again within 20 minutes.

The truth is this scenario can easily be avoided by simply heeding the indicator and taking proper action (setting the tire pressures and starting calibration).

LOW TIRE PRESSURE/TPMS INDICATOR FUNCTIONS
The Low Tire Pressure/TPMS indicator does a variety of things, depending on conditions and circumstances.

Normal Conditions
  • The indicator comes on for a few seconds when you turn the ignition to ON. This is just part of the system check.
  • The indicator comes on for 2 seconds, then goes off, if the vehicle is not moved within 45 seconds after turning the ignition to ON. This just means the system is still calibrating.
Abnormal Conditions
  • The indicator comes on and stays on if one or more tire pressures are very low or the system has not been calibrated. If this happens, the vehicle should be stopped in a safe place, the tire pressures checked and adjusted as needed, and the calibration process started.
  • The indicator blinks for about 1 minute, then stays on if the compact spare tire is mounted or there is a problem with the TPMS.
    If the spare is mounted, the regular tire should be repaired or replaced and mounted as soon as possible, and the calibration process started. If the spare is not mounted, the calibration process should be started and the system checked.
Is there a way to adjust the system to compensate for the 19” upgrades without i hds?
The oem wheels has it on the install sheet but not sure how i could do it without a dealer visit.

TIA!
 

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Is there a way to adjust the system to compensate for the 19” upgrades without i hds?
The oem wheels has it on the install sheet but not sure how i could do it without a dealer visit.

TIA!
Hi,

To find out IF there's 100% 19" wheel compatibility for a trim level that doesn't come with 19" wheels from the factory, the only way to know that is to see if Honda offers an accessory 19" wheel for that model and trim (trim levels that come from the factory with 19" wheels, have VSA modulators with different software for 19" wheels)?

If YES a 19" accessory wheel is offered by Honda, then you'd need to see if the accessory installation bulletin for those wheels tells you if you need to upgrade the VSA module software.

If it does say you need to, then at that point you'd need an I-HDS and a MVCI interface module with the correct software in order to upgrade the VSA module (or downgrade the software if you go back to 18" wheels).

If Honda offers an accessory 19" wheel without mention of any need for software upgrade in the accessory bulletin, then you will be fine, but the key is "does Honda offer a 19" accessory wheel?".

If not it's a gamble, but considering the number of vehicles on the road where folks just upgrade without any awareness of this topic and they're not filling up the dealership service drives with TPMS issues related to wheel/tire size changes, you're probably going to be ok, BUT it's still a gamble.

Cheers!
 

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I've had the same experience with other vehicles. Nit sure if it's the different brand of tires, the fact that the tires are not the same, a bad sensor, or an incompatible sensor installed. But, I had a permanently lit TPMS light on the dash of my Nissan after I had new tires installed.
it seems that now that honda is popular they dont care about customer service, my crv was low on oil after 600 kilometers after an oil change and the dealer topped it up and gave me a bottle of oil to take home, my suv only has 26 thousand kilometers on it.
 
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