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From what I have read, there is a knob on the center console that allows control of the audio system.
 

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From what I have read, there is a knob on the center console that allows control of the audio system.
There is. Think it is called Command Controller, a small control panel which is located in the console between the seats. It's a great device allowing control of the audio, nav, telephone and climate control via a rotary switch which is easily operated without taking your eyes off the road. It was a very intuitive interface between driver and head unit and simplified changes to head unit functions. It is the one thing I miss from my previous Mazda. There's no getting away from the fact that the head unit on the CR-V is a let down.
 

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Oh, and those complaining of Mazda's poor infotainment, check this. Mazda is WAY ahead of Honda. :ROFLMAO:
View attachment 141048 View attachment 141048
Six points difference, way ahead?
Oh, and those complaining of Mazda's poor infotainment, check this. Mazda is WAY ahead of Honda. :ROFLMAO:
View attachment 141048 View attachment 141048
Oh, and those complaining of Mazda's poor infotainment, check this. Mazda is WAY ahead of Honda. :ROFLMAO:
View attachment 141048 View attachment 141048
Six points difference , way ahead?
 

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I look at vehicle brands strategically, long term, NOT transactionally for any given specific vehicle or model year.

I have not owned a Mazda since the early 80s. And in today's market place, there is simply no reason to buy Mazda, unless you are a Mazda fan.

Sure, they have some interesting approaches to exterior and interior design, but nothing that really stands out against the competition... if there was.. Mazda would be eating up market share from Toyota, Honda, and the US brands.. which is is not doing in any measurable way.

I generally own my vehicles for 8-10 years so my main concern with Mazda is that it ends up going the way of Mitsubishi in the US market.. in other words continues to decline into oblivion. Resale value for the CRV is much better than any Mazda as well.. and if Mazda cannot grow market share in the US... or at least keep it static.... not many people will be interested in Mazdas in the used car market.

If you look at sales data for Mazda in the US... the CX5 is their biggest volume seller.. by a wide margin.. yet they sell less than half as many as Honda sells the CRV per year. In this context.. even the CX5 is a disappointment in sales for a company like Mazda ... only gaining a very small increase in sales volume in 2019 (let's ignore 2020... given the funky economic impacts of COVID).

The rest of the Mazda lineup is pretty small volumes and their sedan market has completely collapsed. By comparison, Honda continues to be number one in the compact market with the Civic, and is retaining strong Accord sales as well.. gaining market share against competitors, even though the Accord sees a small decline in total sales YoY. The sedan market in general is in decline, yet Honda has done better than most other brands in retaining sales and thus actually growing market share as the other brands see strong double digit market share declines YoY.

The Mazda brand has some real struggles, as does Nissan, in the North America market though. Part of this may be due to Mazda having no active US factories.. so they import literally every vehicle from a factory outside the US. There last NA facility was a joint venture with Ford, and that has ceased, and Ford bought up the assets.

My understanding is Mazda is attempting to remedy the production disadvantage through a new joint venture with Toyota for a US factory. Toyota does this fairly regularly with other manufacturers to set up plants in different local markets. Thing is though.. this approach has only ever benefited Toyota (who loves to have surplus capacity, and is happy to have other companies help pay the costs to do so). How this will actually help US sales though remains murky.
 

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I also looked at a 2016 CX-5 before buying my Honda '15 CRV EX. I found it to be pretty decent and I liked that it was made in Japan. I am biased because my first Honda was an 92 Acura Integra (also made in Japan) and boy did I love that car. Had zero problems with it. Just regular maintenance.
I also considered the RAV-4, also a good choice. But for my driving style the RAV-4 was a bit too soft in the suspension and didn't pass my "onramp" test...If I can drive well over the speed limit entering onto a highway, the cars handling has to respond to my speed on that turn. Rounding a corner at a high rate of speed really demonstrates the cars road feel. RAV 4 didn't pass it. If anyone has driven a newer VW Golf, you know what I mean. The Golf handles beautifully and is so fun to drive, but reliability is uncertain. The CRV has a decent road feel for a small SUV. It's no NSX, but it has to be fun to drive in my book.
Anyway, back to the CX-5. The main three decisions for me was
1) familiarity with maintenance (since I owned a '08 for 9 years)
2) trunk space- my old CRV '08 trunk was wonderful and I wanted that enormous opening from my road bike to fit in nicely without removing wheels.
3) price and resale value. Honda holds value better than Mazda.
4) I actually saved a few thousand dollars on a lower mileage 2015 EX instead of buying a 2016. If I found a "deal" on a CX-5, I might have considered it.

The verdict is out on our CVT transmissions. Maybe Honda built them well, and we're all good?
 

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...
I have not owned a Mazda since the early 80s. And in today's market place, there is simply no reason to buy Mazda, unless you are a Mazda fan.
...
Well, first, Mazda is not who they were in the 80's. Neither is Honda for that matter. Thank God to both!

I had never considered Mazda, so was no Mazda fan when we were looking for my wife's replacement vehicle in 2018. I actually thought they were way under powered and lacking quality. We looked at the CX-5, because our oldest daughter in TX loves her's. It's a first gen 2014, which I'd been in a couple times and was not all that impressed with. Anyways, we went to the dealer and test drove a Touring, which didn't change my mind of being under powered. We had enough of that with our 2010 CR-V, so was looking for something with more power. I was impressed with the interior for its class, though. While walking out the sales person informed us of the soon to be released Grand Touring Reserve and Signature models with a 2.5l turbo. I went home and did some research and liked what I saw, but it was still a few months away from hitting the dealer lots.

In the meantime, we went to the Acura dealer and test drove the RDX Touring. It was awesome! My wife hated the shifter, though. I figured she would learn to get used to it, so we put it on our short list. Since I seemed to have convinced my wife moving up a class was possible, we stopped by BMW and test drove the X3, then Audi and the Q5. Followed closely by the Mercedes GLC. We loved the Q5 the best, followed by the X3. The Mercedes was not very impressive to us. The problem, all had shifters that my wife was not comfortable with. There's more to the story, but I'll stop there.

About 3 months had passed and our dealer called stating that a new Signature had arrived, but was already sold. We could come look at it if we wanted. We did and were super impressed with the interior. Its Nappa leather seemed as nice as the Semi-aniline in my Lexus. We loved the black headliner and the dark brown leather looked way better in person than it did on the internet. A couple days later thay called again and said we could test drive a GTR with the turbo. It was what sold us on the CX-5. It had the power of the Acura, with the price not much more than a CR-V. The only problem was getting one that wasn't already sold. We decided to put down a deposit and got a call when one in our color showed up on the truck. The rest is history.

So, getting back to your point about not buying Mazda unless you're a fan. Doesn't that go for anything? Why would you buy something you didn't like? Your statement is better suited for sports teams. I don't buy Dallas Cowboy gear, because I'm not a fan. :)
 

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I look at vehicle brands strategically, long term, NOT transactionally for any given specific vehicle or model year.

I have not owned a Mazda since the early 80s. And in today's market place, there is simply no reason to buy Mazda, unless you are a Mazda fan.

Sure, they have some interesting approaches to exterior and interior design, but nothing that really stands out against the competition... if there was.. Mazda would be eating up market share from Toyota, Honda, and the US brands.. which is is not doing in any measurable way.

I generally own my vehicles for 8-10 years so my main concern with Mazda is that it ends up going the way of Mitsubishi in the US market.. in other words continues to decline into oblivion. Resale value for the CRV is much better than any Mazda as well.. and if Mazda cannot grow market share in the US... or at least keep it static.... not many people will be interested in Mazdas in the used car market.

If you look at sales data for Mazda in the US... the CX5 is their biggest volume seller.. by a wide margin.. yet they sell less than half as many as Honda sells the CRV per year. In this context.. even the CX5 is a disappointment in sales for a company like Mazda ... only gaining a very small increase in sales volume in 2019 (let's ignore 2020... given the funky economic impacts of COVID).

The rest of the Mazda lineup is pretty small volumes and their sedan market has completely collapsed. By comparison, Honda continues to be number one in the compact market with the Civic, and is retaining strong Accord sales as well.. gaining market share against competitors, even though the Accord sees a small decline in total sales YoY. The sedan market in general is in decline, yet Honda has done better than most other brands in retaining sales and thus actually growing market share as the other brands see strong double digit market share declines YoY.

The Mazda brand has some real struggles, as does Nissan, in the North America market though. Part of this may be due to Mazda having no active US factories.. so they import literally every vehicle from a factory outside the US. There last NA facility was a joint venture with Ford, and that has ceased, and Ford bought up the assets.

My understanding is Mazda is attempting to remedy the production disadvantage through a new joint venture with Toyota for a US factory. Toyota does this fairly regularly with other manufacturers to set up plants in different local markets. Thing is though.. this approach has only ever benefited Toyota (who loves to have surplus capacity, and is happy to have other companies help pay the costs to do so). How this will actually help US sales though remains murky.
Brought to you by Honda.
 

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ROFL
 

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I look at vehicle brands strategically, long term, NOT transactionally for any given specific vehicle or model year.

I have not owned a Mazda since the early 80s. And in today's market place, there is simply no reason to buy Mazda, unless you are a Mazda fan....
While I am not a Mazda fan, I disagree.

The current CX5 is definitely a valid competitor to the CR-V. It mostly fits a slightly different buyer, but in many ways it excels over the CR-V.

There are several reasons we didn't consider the CX5 before buying our 20 CRV in Feb 2020. The BIGGEST reason is the local dealer. The service dept is the worst service department I have EVER dealt with in approximately 40 years of buying new or near new vehicles. BAR NONE.

Next closest is too far away to be of any use, and is an unkown entity.

BTW, we have owned several Mazdas, probably more than Hondas at this point. I'd have to count.
 
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So, getting back to your point about not buying Mazda unless you're a fan. Doesn't that go for anything? Why would you buy something you didn't like?
Not liking something is certainly grounds to not buy... but that was NOT what I stated.

I simply stated that Mazda is really struggling in the US market.. and has for years.. so unless you are a Mazda fan.. there is little incentive to buy Mazda these days. Particularly when there are equally good choices from competitors in the very competitive compact SUV/CUV market. And as a result.. resale value and demand for Mazdas is on a long slow decline.

Every vehicle manufacturer is fighting for market share, and have for years... and that is fine.. and actually good for consumers because it most often results in manufacturers taking some risks with new features and styling.. which by the way.. can just as easily backfire on the manufacturer.

Closing on Mazda from a business analysis perspective ... the ONLY real volume seller they have in there entire lineup in the US is the CX5.. which generally sells to a younger market... and has features and styling for the younger buyers. But let's be honest.. US sales of CX5s is ~ 150K a year. The rest of their entire line up added together does not equal CX5 sales volumes. Honda sells more than twice that number of CRVs every year, and continues to modestly grow market share in the toughest segment in the market (compact SUV/CUV). In addition, Honda sells over 300K Civics and Accords in the US market every year.

Volume and broad spread in sales across a product line IS important for vehicle manufacturers. Where Honda is doing over a million vehicles a year just with CRV, Civic, and Accord.... Mazda can barely break 250K across a combined total of every model they sell. This is precisely what happened to Mitsubishi over a period of years of persistent decline.. due to very marginal offerings for the market. Now days, Mitsubishi is a foot note in the US consumer vehicle market. But Mitsubishi has many industries they play in, so they will be fine without an auto market in the US.

One mistake from Mazda in design or supply chain on the CX5 and their US market is toast... which circles back to my main point.... there is no reason (and actually real risks) of buying a Mazda in today's market place. Mazda may be able to turn this around in time.. but time will tell on that.. as they could just as easily become a footnote in the US consumer vehicle market.

If you are a Mazda fan, or are in love with the CX5.. that would be grounds for an individual consumer to buy Mazda. But that is about the only valid grounds in the current market in my view.
 

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Not liking something is certainly grounds to not buy... but that was NOT what I stated.

I simply stated that Mazda is really struggling in the US market.. and has for years.. so unless you are a Mazda fan.. there is little incentive to buy Mazda these days. Particularly when there are equally good choices from competitors in the very competitive compact SUV/CUV market. And as a result.. resale value and demand for Mazdas is on a long slow decline.
...
Then something is getting lost in the translation.

The incentive to buy Mazda, or Honda for that matter, is personal needs and wants. For us, there was no "equally" good choice in the price range below $40k. Now, if you really want to go there on a Honda forum, Mazda is higher on the reliability chart for a few years running. You're smart enough to look that up yourself, so I'll leave it at that.

As far as resale, the difference between the CX-5 and CR-V is around $1k after 5 years. The advantage to the CR-V. Do you buy vehicles as investments? If so, you're doing it wrong. :)
 

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For purpose of discussion and to occupy minds during the pandemic (other data may be avail, just from a search)

Regardless, many buyers are not "nerds" like us and prioritize looks, financing incentives, and other factors over reliability. The CX5 is highly rated by auto publications but lacks in sales compared to the top which brings up the theory of promotion by the auto publications. However, as stated above by someone Mazda does not seem to worry about volume. Suppose they want to grow thru their loyal customers/fans.

RAV4 really got a boost with the redesign

US car sales analysis 2020 first half - Compact crossovers - carsalesbase.com

2020 US Small SUV Sales Figures (similar chart)

Q1 2020
Compact SUV segment20202019ChangeShare
1​
Toyota RAV4
97.631​
83.820​
16%11,7%
2​
Chevrolet Equinox
73.453​
88.500​
-17%8,8%
3​
Honda CR-V
71.186​
87.280​
-18%8,5%
4​
Nissan Rogue
59.716​
93.814​
-36%7,1%
5​
Ford Escape
48.117​
60.702​
-21%5,7%
6​
Jeep Wrangler
39.668​
49.988​
-21%4,7%
7​
Subaru Forester
39.080​
40.656​
-4%4,7%
8​
Mazda CX-5
35.211​
37.494​
-6%4,2%
9​
Jeep Cherokee
33.675​
49.420​
-32%4,0%
10​
Jeep Compass
29.820​
37.306​
-20%3,6%
11​
GMC Terrain
25.292​
25.364​
0%3,0%
12​
Hyundai Tucson
23.735​
28.831​
-18%2,8%
13​
Volkswagen Tiguan L
22.176​
26.533​
-16%2,6%
14​
Chevrolet Blazer
22.144​
3.023​
633%2,6%
15​
Subaru Crosstrek
21.516​
26.197​
-18%2,6%
16​
Kia Sportage
20.057​
19.198​
4%2,4%
17​
Dodge Journey
15.152​
24.003​
-37%2,6%
18​
Mitsubishi Outlander
13.156​
14.371​
-8%2,2%
19​
Mercedes-Benz GLC
13.098​
15.366​
-15%2,2%
20​
Mitsubishi Outlander Sport
12.577​
12.457​
1%2,1%
21​
Lexus NX
11.309​
13.775​
-18%1,9%
22​
Acura RDX
11.153​
14.972​
-26%1,3%
23​
BMW X3
10.614​
14.568​
-27%1,8%
24​
Toyota C-HR
10.372​
14.521​
-29%1,2%
25​
Audi Q5
9.959​
15.228​
-35%1,2%
26​
Cadillac XT5
9.023​
13.278​
-32%1,1%
27​
Mazda CX-30
8.364​
0​
New1,0%
28​
Buick Envision
6.932​
7.623​
-9%1,2%
29​
Lincoln Corsair/MKC
5.670​
5.787​
-2%1,0%
30​
Volvo XC60
5.569​
6.636​
-16%0,7%
31​
Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross
5.184​
8.997​
-42%0,9%
32​
Kia Niro
4.975​
5.346​
-7%0,6%
33​
Infiniti QX50
4.170​
3.583​
16%0,7%
34​
Jaguar F-Pace
3.992​
4.540​
-12%0,7%
35​
Porsche Macan
3.777​
4.208​
-10%0,6%
36​
Range Rover Velar
3.617​
4.949​
-27%0,6%
37​
Land Rover Discovery Sport
2.459​
3.527​
-30%0,4%
38​
Alfa Romeo Stelvio
1.913​
2.210​
-13%0,3%
39​
BMW X4
1.788​
1.436​
25%0,3%
40​
Jaguar I-Pace
446​
608​
-27%0,1%
41​
Lincoln MKT
109​
1.242​
-91%0,0%
42​
Hyundai Nexo
51​
60​
-15%0,0%
43​
Jeep Patriot
1​
10​
-90%0,0%
44​
Volkswagen Tiguan
1​
164​
-99%0,0%
Segment total
837.908
971.591
-14%
Source: Manufacturers.
 

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As noted by others the dealership makes a significant difference. Here in KC there are several dealers but even the closest dealer is several miles away from home base for my wife and I. Unfortunately my wife had a terrible experience with another of their dealerships so that is a deal-breaker for us. Honda on the other hand as well as some other competitors have multiple dealerships within a 15 minute drive.

I like the CX-5 and would consider one for my next purchase as if all goes as planned I'll be retired and a longer commute to the dealership won't be an issue. Historically, I've owned two other Mazda's and I put over 200K miles on each with virtually no issues. In fact I would rate them as two of the better vehicles I've owned over the last nearly 50 years.
 

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RAV4 really got a boost with the redesign
Ironically, that's the reason I didn't buy it! Terrible engine noise, crappy transmission and cramped interior. I had even pre-negotiated a price with the dealer as I was so certain I was coming home with it. After my disappointing test drive ... no thanks! Walked across the street to the Honda dealership and fell in love with the CRV!
 
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