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Thank you much for this forum, new poster. Thinking of trading in my 2011 CRV for a 2020. But two separate questions.

First question: Took my 2011 in for routine maintenance few weeks ago. Talked to a service technician. They stated that in 2022 the CRV was due for a major redesign. I don't know how they knew this (if true) or what they meant by "major redesign". Searched the Internet. I was expecting this, no information. After all, the auto manufacturers are tight lipped about their future updates. My ONLY interest is in the 2022 engine. Will they keep the 1.5 turbo, change it, or have an optional engine? Yes, I realize none of you probably know but I had to take the chance.

Second question: I am, or was, interested in the CRV Hybrid to be released in America later this spring (been around for a few years in other countries as I understand it). But I "heard" that the hybrid will not have one of the most essential items need for a real family vehicle (in my opinion), a spare tire. Is this true Honda? No spare tire. This is a deal killer.

Thanks much for all reading and replies, Acadia
 

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Generally speaking.. Honda rolls out new designs every 5 years (sooner if they make a huge mistake, like they have on Civics a couple times over the years). So yes, that would result in the gen6 CRV coming out in 2022. That is not 100% certain of course, but it very much is consistent with how Honda does things.

Correct... the 2020 CRV Hybrid (and maybe all 2020 CRVs) have no spare, but rather a flat tire kit (which will only help with simple punctures). Reason is the battery pack for the Hybrid resides where the compact spare has been on CRVS for years now. I'm not fond of this idea, and have specfiically scored it very low in periodic surveys I receive from Honda on future vehicle preferences, but clearly Honda did not listen to me. :p I imagine this move by Honda may result in a whole range of after market kits to add a compact spare somewhere in the cargo hold area for owners who don't want a no-spare tire option.

I would love a Hybrid CRV... but personally I would wait until the second year of the gen6 before considering one, and that will be when my 2017 is ~7 years old.. so timing would be good for me personally, and waiting means getting the newer generation CRV and waiting until the second year to see if there are any notable issues with a gen6 Hybrid/PluginHybrid. There might even be an electrice CRV in the offering in the gen6 (time will tell on this).
 

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I'm curious. Why would you say a spare tire is "one of the most essential items need(ed) for a real family vehicle"?

Did you know that new Hondas come with free roadside assistance for 3 years, most full-coverage insurance policies include roadside assistance, and there are other services (such as AAA) that many people pay for?

Even if you don't have some type of roadside assistance plan, as long as you have a working cellphone I don't get what the big deal is.

I would bet that a good percentage of drivers don't know how to change their tire in the first place. I would also bet that even for those that do, many would rather call a tow truck than having to deal with the possible danger, dirtiness and inconvenience of changing it themselves.

Of course, if you drive in rural areas with spotty cell coverage and/or that are far away from civilization then I could see a how a spare tire could be pretty important.

With this being said, I do get how changing a flat yourself can be more convenient than having to sit and wait for a tow truck, as long as you have the skills and don't mind getting dirty. I just don't get how it can be that important of a thing in this day and age for a "real family vehicle".
 

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I'm curious. Why would you say a spare tire is "one of the most essential items need(ed) for a real family vehicle"?
Obviously not important for you, but probably important for other people. It is for me.

I wish my 2014 CR-V had a full sized spare like my 1999 and 2006 CR-Vs had, but understand why Honda went with a "donut" spare that's the same diameter as the regular tires. And if your CR-V has RT4WD/AWD then having a set of four tires that have the same circumference is important, so having a matching full sized spare is important
 

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Obviously not important for you, but probably important for other people. It is for me.
Actually, it is important for me, but only because I like to do most of my own auto repairs. I would actually love to have my own tire machine and balancer if I had the extra money and room for them.

As I look around my neighborhood though, It's very rare that I see anyone other than me working on their vehicles. I just figured that for most people a cell phone and a credit card would be more than a suitable replacement for a spare tire.

I figure that right off the bat, almost 1/2 of the drivers are women who probably have a cell phone and credit card and no desire to change their own tire. The other 1/2 are men, who also have a cell phone and a credit card and no desire to change their own tire.

Am I wrong with this line of thinking?
 

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Actually, it is important for me, but only because I like to do most of my own auto repairs. I would actually love to have my own tire machine and balancer if I had the extra money and room for them.

As I look around my neighborhood though, It's very rare that I see anyone other than me working on their vehicles. I just figured that for most people a cell phone and a credit card would be more than a suitable replacement for a spare tire.

I figure that right off the bat, almost 1/2 of the drivers are women who probably have a cell phone and credit card and no desire to change their own tire. The other 1/2 are men, who also have a cell phone and a credit card and no desire to change their own tire.

Am I wrong with this line of thinking?
Well you are partially right. I have had to say it time and again on this forum, but the average CRV buyer is a 55 year old. Probably male, but doesn't really matter.

Between free road side for 3 years and the typical buyer, the need for a spare is dropping.

Hell I'm a 30 something and have only changed a flat tire 2 times in my life and never on my own vehicle. I haven't even looked for the spare on my last 2 vehicles. Do I know how to do it? Yep. I do all other maintenance myself.
 

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Meh; I like having a spare, but I can see why automakers have been omitting it, in lieu of fix-a-flat and a compressor.
  • It's heavy
  • Many people are afraid to change a tire, and even if you are willing, it's a messy job because of brake dust.
  • The widow-maker jacks are dangerous unless used very carefully, and often unusable entirely (like on soft or uneven ground.)
  • The factory lug wrench is often insufficient to remove impact-slammed lugs put on by lazy mechanics
  • Tires are less failure-prone than in days of yore
  • The thing's nearly always under-inflated, and most people don't carry a 12V compressor. Honda doesn't make it easy to keep it topped up; the valve stem is on the underside of the spare wheel when it's in storage. An under-inflated spare is just as bad and useless as no spare. (Be honest; when was the last time you checked the spare's pressure?)
  • The spare's not that useful other than as a means to drive to the tire shop; what is it that the manual calls for? No more than 50MPH, no more than 75 miles?
Speaking for myself, I have a duffel bag of stuff under the trunk floor with a 12V compressor, warning triangles, a tarp, a square of plywood to stabilize the jack on soft ground, a bit of scrap 2x4 to chock the opposite wheel, (and other car emergency supplies; some compact basic tools, spare fuses, a ratty blanket, etc.) and I do all my own lugs. I even have an extension tube attached to the spare's valve stem so I can check the pressure without removing the spare from the trunk (or even lifting the trunk floor.) But most people don't carry any of this around...
 

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I even have an extension tube attached to the spare's valve stem so I can check the pressure without removing the spare from the trunk (or even lifting the trunk floor.)
SIRWIRED….love that trick with the valve stem extension....where did you buy it? I also hate the job of pulling the spare to check the tire pressure. I also carry a 2' length of steel pipe that goes over the lug nut wrench in case the nuts are too tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Someone above stated that all 2020's may not have a spare, not to worry, only the hybrids will not have a spare.

As for the tire repair kits that some rave about, they will not do you diddly squat if you completely blow or shred your tire.

Thanks for all of the replies, keep them coming, you folks have been great.
Acadia
 

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I too like to have a spare tire available. I haven't had to change a tire in probably 25 years or more. Did it a lot in the 60's. My concern would be in the advent of a ruined tire, that the service truck would have the correct tire & rim to mount , given the many possibilities.
 

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SIRWIRED….love that trick with the valve stem extension....where did you buy it? I also hate the job of pulling the spare to check the tire pressure. I also carry a 2' length of steel pipe that goes over the lug nut wrench in case the nuts are too tight.
The hose I bought has been discontinued, but viair makes a 6' "portable air compressor extension hose" that is overkill for length, but will work just fine. Amazon item B00ELJD0BW. You'll also need a right-angle valve stem adapter, as the opening for the stem is pointed at the floor. B072WMZDFF will do fine.

On your cheater-pipe. I'd suggest going with a real breaker-bar and one of the correct-sized socket, so you don't have to worry about the wrench failing. Harbor Freight has some perfectly good bars and sockets for cheap.
 

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I'm curious. Why would you say a spare tire is "one of the most essential items need(ed) for a real family vehicle"?

Did you know that new Hondas come with free roadside assistance for 3 years, most full-coverage insurance policies include roadside assistance, and there are other services (such as AAA) that many people pay for?
If you do not want to be stuck on the side of a freeway, or out in the middle of nowhere for hours waiting for roadside assistance to arrive....for a tire that has more then just puncture damage.... then you want a spare in your vehicle.

Yes... most of us get roadside assistance either from Honda, or from our insurance company, etc. Have you ever actually had to use it? If so, you would likely find that it will result in most of your day wasted. First you have to contact RA, then wait.. and since all such programs use 3rd party towing services... response times are all over the map, so expect anywhere between 90 minutes and several hours. THEN.. for something as simple as a blown tire that the kit cannot repair.. your vehicle must be towed somewhere to get a replacement tire installed and get you back on your trip, which could easily take another couple hours before you are back on the road. You may be OK with that, but personally I would find it an unacceptable impact to my planned activities for the day, especially for something as simple as a tire.

Tip: Roadside Assistance is meant for use only when your vehicle has been disabled due to a failure. Putting a simple single tire failure into that equation is nuts... but I grant that it is a less expensive solution for Honda, particularly when they want the interior space for something else... such as a hybrid battery pack.

You may not care, but a lot of people do not want to be forced into an RA cycle simply for a single tire failure. I prefer to have a spare, and that allows me to deal with the issue in 15 minutes, and then I am back on the road and have options as to when and how I get the failed tire replaced.. rather then being held hostage all day in an RA cycle.
 

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SIRWIRED….love that trick with the valve stem extension....where did you buy it? I also hate the job of pulling the spare to check the tire pressure. I also carry a 2' length of steel pipe that goes over the lug nut wrench in case the nuts are too tight.
For bonus points, get yourself a pressure sending valve stem cap and stick it on the end of your extension. Then, checking the pressure becomes a glance!

You will likely want an L shaped stem adapter to plug into the tire, the space is tight there. Then the extension. Finally the pressure sensing cap.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

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I realize I'm not the typical driver, but I check the pressure in the spare once a year, and since it has a 60 PSI limit, I typically fill it to around 70 knowing that it's going to lose some air over the course of the next 12 months. In the event I actually have to use it, I keep a gauge in the car so I can let some air out in case it's still above 60 when I actually put in on the car. Also, I have my own torque wrench and socket so I can always make sure my lugs aren't overtorqued by dumba$$es who rotate tires and use those hideous air guns. I definitely like having a spare. Run flats and repair kits just don't cut it. I agree, roadside assitance is a complete joke. EIther pay $60 a year for AAA (which is also a very mixed bag, depending on when and where you need them) or recognize that you're truly on your own out in the jungle.
 

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Many new cars no longer have spare tires - they have gone to the run-flat tires.
Spare tires add weight and car makers are trying to get rid of weight.
I have a 2016 and I have a full sized spare - I surrounded the spare tire well with 2x2 wooden frame and the rear deck sits on top.
No one seems to miss the 2 inches that it takes to add the full sized spare - Honda could not lower the tire well 2 inches as it would hit the rear suspension.
 

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Many new cars no longer have spare tires - they have gone to the run-flat tires.
...
It's that, or a can of Fix-a-flat.

I've only had a flat a couple times while driving. Once, the tire was destroyed and a can of Fix-a-flat wouldn't have done much good. I was happy to have a spare. Runflats are a little better option, but you pay for it in harsher ride quality. Also, they're more expensive to replace.
 

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Those fix-a-flat cans usually destroy the TPMS equipment, so if you use one, expect to have to buy a whole new sensor assembly, even if the tire itself is actually salvageable with a proper patch.
 
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