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I have just purchased a 2016 CR V EX L with 45,000 I have always used Mobil 1 10W30 and I see the V calls for 5W20. This is my first Honda and I want it to last a looooong time. Why does it need such a low viscosity oil?
 

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Because Honda, the engine designer and manufacturer, designed their engine to run with the lower viscosity oil.

Oh, and it also helps increase fuel mileage.

I'd use what Honda suggests.
 

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It's the never ending quest for more mpg.
For me, I have four cars none take the same viscosity oil. I nail it on oil changes. Only car to use oil between changes is a 24 year old truck.
 

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I have just purchased a 2016 CR V EX L with 45,000 I have always used Mobil 1 10W30 and I see the V calls for 5W20. This is my first Honda and I want it to last a looooong time. Why does it need such a low viscosity oil?
This article, by Dr. A E Haas, may give you a better understanding of motor oil and lubrication vs pressure, thick vs thin, operating temp vs below operating temp, the 1st number being more important than the 2nd number.

http://www.positivespin.us/MotorOil.htm
 

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Internal engine tolerances have become more 'refined' in time and some internal oil channels are smaller then they were even five years ago.

The lower first number (5) is the viscosity when the engine is cold. Honda has determined that '5' is correct for proper lubrication when your engine is starting up.

New CR-V's call for 0-20...I presume the internal oil runs are even smaller in diameter than in your seven your old (designed year) engine.

Best to you.
 

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If you 'nail' the oil change intervals you won't have any issues. If you are trying to reduce the different types of oil you need to buy, try using a wider-viscosity like M1 0W-30 or 5W-30. It won't hurt anything to go one range thicker, especially if the cold flow temp is nice and low.
 

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2016 calling for 5W20? Where are you from? My 2013 calls for 0W20 and I thought the newer DI 2.4’s also called for 0W20.


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Internal engine tolerances have become more 'refined' in time and some internal oil channels are smaller then they were even five years ago.

The lower first number (5) is the viscosity when the engine is cold. Honda has determined that '5' is correct for proper lubrication when your engine is starting up.

New CR-V's call for 0-20...I presume the internal oil runs are even smaller in diameter than in your seven your old (designed year) engine.

Best to you.
There is mythology and then there is CAFE.
 

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I have the same engine in my '15. The oil cap says 0-20. Which is synthetic. I've never used anything else. Like has been noted the internal oil channels are so small that you want to be as close to "water" as you can and still call it oil. Been that way for many years. Long gone are the "good old days" where I would use 10-30 in the cold seasons, 20-50 in the warm, in my small block chevy.
The '16 2.4 isn't known to be much of an oil user, so use 0-20 and call it good. Won't need to be changed again for a while!
 

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There are very few vehicles that say 10w30 for oil anymore. Except for large engines and such it has been rare for about 15+ yrs now.

Honda's do not like 10w30. The VTEC system is well known for having issues using anything more than 5w30. The V6 Honda engines aren't quite so finicky about it, 10w30 is ok if you live in the southwest but anywhere it gets cold you can risk VTEC errors.

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Are oil channels/runs/passages, that feed oil to bearing surfaces, really getting smaller?.....or are bearing clearances getting smaller/smoother due to better polishing procedures?
 

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I believe owner’s manuals in other countries show 10W30 as acceptable in the 1.5L.
 

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good to know. What do you use in yours? You are another on this Forum that would be right at home as a guest on "Coast to Coast AM".
 

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I have the same engine in my '15. The oil cap says 0-20. Which is synthetic. I've never used anything else. Like has been noted the internal oil channels are so small that you want to be as close to "water" as you can and still call it oil. Been that way for many years. Long gone are the "good old days" where I would use 10-30 in the cold seasons, 20-50 in the warm, in my small block chevy.
The '16 2.4 isn't known to be much of an oil user, so use 0-20 and call it good. Won't need to be changed again for a while!
As someone stated, the CAFE standards explain why they've gone to 0W20. The 2011 Fit called for 5W20 but the 2012 is 0W20 despite both engines being identical. Since CAFE tests probably go from cold start and immediately driving the vehicle, it's pretty clear that a 0W20 oil will have less drag on the engine when it's stone cold than a 5W20 oil with ambient temp at 32 degrees F. However, if you live in a warm climate like I do where the lowest ambient temperature is probably 70 degrees, I can run 5W20 without any issues at all in an engine specifying 0W20. These newer engines have much tighter tolerances than engines from decades ago so it would be wise to run the oil with the same "second" number, that is, the viscosity when the oil is at normal operating temperature. If the oil temperature is 200 degrees (warm engine) there is no viscosity difference between the 0W20 and 5W20. However, at 0 degrees F there is a noticeable difference.
 

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good to know. What do you use in yours? You are another on this Forum that would be right at home as a guest on "Coast to Coast AM".
........and that is supposed to mean what?
 

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Steve Wil said:
Why does it need such a low viscosity oil?
Same engine around the world in similar climate conditions runs just fine on anything from 0W--xx where xx=16,20,30,40 and in hot climates on anything xW-yy where x=0,5,10

Above the Arctic Circle in the middle of winter we use 0W-16 or 0W-20 and in Australia in the middle of summer we use 10W-40. Same precise engines and models as we drive in the USA.

We run a dozen different honda models in family on multiple continents and none of our hondas have ever had an oil related breakdown.

In the USA we use whatever is on annual clearance bin at Autozone, Advance Auto, Walmart, Amazon and have often settled on a premium synthetic with prices less than $2/qt
 

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This article, by Dr. A E Haas, may give you a better understanding of motor oil and lubrication vs pressure, thick vs thin, operating temp vs below operating temp, the 1st number being more important than the 2nd number.

http://www.positivespin.us/MotorOil.htm

That article you linked is fantastic!

The author properly points out that oil flow is the most important parameter in your engine.. not viscosity ratings.

I found this part particularly notable, given the talk in the OD thread about using heavier oils then specified by Honda in order to mitigate dilution effects:

Dr. Haas believes that oil is much better being too thin than too thick. In recent years manufactures have been specifying thinner and thinner oils despite hotter engines with turbos and the like. The tendency is that people figure they need a 40 grade oils but then use a 50 instead. Better thinking is that if you think you need a 40, use a 30 grade oil instead.

The thickness of moving oil is measured in centiStokes or cS. Most engines want the oil viscosity to be around 10 cS at normal operating temperature. The really thick multi-grade oils have a viscosity of 20 cS at operating temperature. One is not twice as thick as the other, it is only 10 cS thicker.
His comments to me suggest that conventional common thinking about oil viscosity for your engine is incorrect. He makes a very good case for focusing on oil viscosity at cold start temperature, NOT viscosity at full running temperature. Further.. this all goes to the actual flow rate of the oil in the engine, which is most critical at cold start up.

He also makes it very clear how superior synthetic oils are for engine life in modern engines.

I encourage everyone to take time to read the article.
 

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Just use what they recommend. Of course I will trade every three years at 70,000 miles so I don't care after that.
 

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Many years ago I too was one who questioned the use of ever lower oil viscosities - but ultimatly decided the manufacturer knew better than I (and a shade tree mechanic).

More painful was getting over the 3K oil change interval habit (2K on a former mid 90's Toyota that was known to have an oil sludge problem).

Now, following Hondas onboard computer recommendations, I've gone to 9K-12K (once) mile intervals. To date (starting with a 1960 Buick) I've NEVER blown an engine.
 
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