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What are the areas that you generally want to cover with the undercoat and the components you want to avoid?

I know there are people that are totally against the rubberized undercoating but a lot of us already have it done at the dealership or elsewhere.

I am asking this question since my 2009 CRV's undercoating has started to come off and the service advisor advised to get it retouched. I went to local walmart and purchased a $3 Rust Check undercoat spray can. Before I start spraying the undercoat I want to make sure that I am not coating the areas that I am not supposed to.

Let me know.
 

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Living in the south we do not have much of these issues - so my knowledge is limited. That said I would suggest getting any loose coating off the surrounding areas before applying the new coating to ensure proper adhesion.
 

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Back in '67 before a/c was that common I bought a '67 Mustang GT fastback with air. Living in Michigan I immediately took the car to Z-Bart for undercoating. I always had a problem with condensation from the a/c wetting the front passenger carpet area. It wasn't till years later that we figured out the small little hose that dripped out the condensation at the bottom of the car had been sealed shut. Be aware.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Back in '67 before a/c was that common I bought a '67 Mustang GT fastback with air. Living in Michigan I immediately took the car to Z-Bart for undercoating. I always had a problem with condensation from the a/c wetting the front passenger carpet area. It wasn't till years later that we figured out the small little hose that dripped out the condensation at the bottom of the car had been sealed shut. Be aware.
Glad you found the issue, how did you unclog that dispense hole? How is the car now if it is still around?
 

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Never solved the issue till after the car had been sold. A/C was just becoming popular among the common people and no one really had enough experience with it to solve the issue when it happened. Also, if someone has a moon/sun roof they want to make sure the drain hoses are never plugged up.
 

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If that '67 had the 390, I would go buy it back. One of the fastest cars I ever drove. You don't want to get any undercoating on the engine or exhaust. Otherwise it won't really hurt anything, just sometimes makes it a pain to work on. Back in the day, the gooey tar-like undercoating was the bomb. It would prevent any possibility of rust, forever. It also had some weight to it, but in those days you had enough horsepower to not worry. The dried out rubbery stuff never impressed me. Luckily, this kind of thing is not an issue where I live, in the more habitable part of the world.
 

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Not THE fastest, but one of the fastest (street legal and on the street). Very solid at 150 mph on the road. The 440 GTX was starting to float at that speed. Too big. The Mustang was more squat and low, and stayed down better. I also drove the '69 390 GT, which would easily outrun the '69 428 GT. So, yeah, the 390 was bad. It was a side-oiler, after all, like it's big brother, the 427 side-oiler, which was the top of the Ford heap by far. I had a friend who owned a '63 Galaxy 500 convertible, turquoise with white interior, 427 4-speed, man what a car that was. Never could outrun him with my trusty 409 Shiv-o-ray.
 

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OP - I think you are referring to the black rubberized undercoating in the wheel wells?

And it is starting to flake off? And you'd like to re-touch it?

Here's what I did.

1. Removed the wheel.
2. Used an electric pressure washer to thoroughly clean the wheel wells. Be prepared to find several pounds of road filth that has collected in the pockets. I was shocked at how much debris the Honda would accumulate
3. Follow up with a green 3M scour pad.
4. Clean with acetone (use respirator or well-ventilated area).
5. Mask body and surrounding areas with paper/tape.
6. Spray 3M undercoating (I highly suggest using a respirator. Or outside in the open air. Not in a garage without a respirator).
7. Spray 2nd coat.
8. Do the rest of the wheel wells.

The picture is "pretty good". I continued to scrub with a green scour pad to remove the existing rubberized undercoating that was failing. It's impossible to remove it all, or if you do, you did a better job than I did :)

I wouldn't just "shoot" rustoleum where it's failing. It'll make it black for a while, but it'll just flake off again. You really need to prepare the surface before reapplying the factory undercoating. And I only re-applied in locations where it was previously applied. I did not expand.




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