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Aug 2015 Honda CR-V EX / FWD / 3000 Miles / 60 % Fuel Life Available / No Serving Done Since Buy / Geico Basic Insurance

I'm moving from Columbia SC to New Jersey (approx 700 miles) after few weeks and have reserved a 6x12 U-Haul cargo trailer to move my stuff. The weight limit of this trailer is 2480 lbs. 1900 Lb empty. My stuff weight to expected to be 1000 - 1500 lb + 1900 = Total Approx 2900 - 3450 lb. The standard permissible towing limit is 1500 lb. U-haul has suggested to install a Hitch Receiver Whole Kit of approx $295, which I am planning to install soon. I am only 9 months old to USA, have drove approx 5K miles so far in/out cities like Chicago, Charlotte, GA & FL. HAVE NEVER BEEN TO NJ & NEVER EVER TOWED ANY KIND OF TRAILER SO FAR.

1 - The allowable towing capa is 1500 lb but as per with a installed hitch set towing upto 3500 lbs is fine. Is it reliable ? will there be any issue ?

2 - Though I am yet to visit uhaul center to get advised/installed required hitch equipment's, these are the required eligible items showing Hitch Received, Ball Mount, Hitch Balls, Pin & Clip, Wiring, Installation Charges of total $420. Can you pls advise which are required & which are optional to be installed & is UHaul price is Ok ?

3 - Pls advise on DOs & DO NOTs - like on speed limit, pre-check up like engine oil, pressure, transmission oil & other aspects. Is it true that I should not drive beyond 55 mph.

4 - I am planning to stay in a ExtendedStayAmerica Hotel somewhere in night after covering 300 miles approx. My concern is in hotel parking, I cant park my CRV with the Cargo Trailer attached as it will remain LONG & cause inconvenience for Parking vehicles. What is normally people do ? If I remove the trailer from CRV, then I may not put it back & the detached trailer may get stolen & not secured. CAN PLS ADVISE HERE ON THIS SITUATION ?

5 - I drive calm & confident, I have never towed ever in USA & I will be doing this FIRST TIME & my family will be travelling with me. Is there any aspect I have to look into before, while on road & after reaching there. PLS ADVISE.

THANKS !
 

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No matter what size hitch you install the factory tow rating is still 1500 lbs.

Personal opinion : Exceeding factory tow rating by 2000 lbs with now towing experience equals recipe for disaster.
 

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Have you looked at a moving service like U-Pack from ABF? Uhaul has a similar service, and so do a few other companies (PODS, others). Basically they deliver a small storage container to your street, you have a couple days to load it, then they come haul it away and deliver it to your destination. One ABF pod is about the size of a 6x12 trailer. I used this service a few years ago and it worked well for us.

After towing a 4x8 Uhaul trailer last weekend about 400 miles, with my 2012 CR-V, I would not recommend towing anything larger than that. And I have towed a fully-loaded 6x12 Uhaul twice, more than 500 miles each time, with a properly Ford Ranger pickup, and I can assure you that you don't want to do that with a CR-V.
 

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No matter what size hitch you install the factory tow rating is still 1500 lbs.

Personal opinion : Exceeding factory tow rating by 2000 lbs with now towing experience equals recipe for disaster.
+1. There is nothing that UHaul can say or do that will increase the vehicle tow rating above the factory spec of 1500 lbs.

They clearly are more interested in the sale over your safety. Apply the $ you were going to spend at UHaul to getting your belongings to NJ in a reliable and safe way.
 

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+1. There is nothing that UHaul can say or do that will increase the vehicle tow rating above the factory spec of 1500 lbs.
In Europe, the max tow rating was ~2500 lbs. BUT this is with a trailer with brakes.

In the end, I agree with the others, try an alternative service or rent a box-truck.
 

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NO--NO--NO. Don't do it. Installing a heavier capacity hitch WILL NOT increase your towing capacity. You WILL damage your CRV and possibly yourself.
 

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I have a class III hitch on our 2007 CRV. The trailer will carry 3000 pounds but I'm sure it would be at the cost of a transmission. I make sure I stay under 1000 total weight, and have my transmission serviced regularly since I live in an area with hills. Also be aware that stock CRV brakes are not made to handle that kind of weight. Even the weight I pull causes a noticable increase in stopping distance. Your fuel mileage will suffer drastically with a trailer that size.
As the saying goes, you could probably do it once but at what cost to the vehicle. Don't do it.
 

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You can be sure you can tow "more than the 1500 lb max", as Honda prefers to be on the safe side (This way you cannot sue them), but that is definitely excessive.

If your life dependent on it, it would be doable, but for safeties sake, you shouldn’t do it.
 

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Towing more than 100miles will surely destroy both your tranny and engine's piston ring.
Diesel engine is the best for towing.
 

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Towing more than 100miles will surely destroy both your tranny and engine's piston ring.
Diesel engine is the best for towing.
A gasoline truck would tow this trailer just fine. A diesel is a bit overkill.
 

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The real question in towing is not what the vehicle can manage to tow, but what you can control going down the road, and especially stop in a panic situation. For a short distance, I might be willing to fudge the manufacturer's 1,500 lb. tow rating by a couple of hundred pounds and take it real easy, but the load you're proposing is over double the rated limit. Paying a U-Pack or even renting a tow vehicle would cost a lot less than a transmission, not to mention the endless consequences of an accident with a way-over-limit trailer behind you.
 

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I've done three long-distance moves with very heavy loads with our former '97 CR-V (tow rating: 1000lb). U-haul truck towing CR-V on trailer, Penske truck towing CR-V on trailer, and using ABF U-pack containers to have them move the bulk of our stuff while driving the CR-V with cats and suitcases inside.

The CR-V is good for some casual towing, but not hefty stuff like this at all. You'll also doubtless incinerate your warranty and possibly your transmission too by going through with this. As everyone else has said, don't even think about it.

If you can in any way stand not having all your belongings with you for a few days then I'd strongly suggest using a pod/container service: shop around, they can be very competitive with truck+car trailer (note that with the transmission in the '15 you'll need the all-wheels-up variety, not the front-axle-only kind). If you do choose the truck+trailer route then watch the weather forecast for windy conditions (all such trucks are very high-sided compared to what you're used to), plus bear in mind that narrow interstate lanes can be tricky to stay between the lines of (glance at side mirrors often) and that reversing with a trailer is about 10x more difficult than you think it is if you've not done it before. Check your favorite satellite mapping service to see if it's possible to park at your hotel without having to reverse in the morning and call ahead to see if they'd be so kind as to reserve some parking area for you. Myself, I try to make the last day's travel as close to a half-day as possible since you'll be wanting to do as much unloading and unpacking as possible later that same day. Hire some local brawn to help if you need it (I've used the U-haul site for professional loading/unloading help).
 

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Did you make the trip with the CRV ? How did it fare ?
Couple things, my experience with towing is with both manual transmissions and automatics- I know nothing about CVT towing (if you are so equipped). MFR rating for my CRV (5 speed AT) is 1500 lbs. Usually a mfr rating is conservative and accounts for many conditions (including hills) in my own humble opinion. Towing in a flat area like the South and especially if at lower non highway speeds, you may be able to cheat a little occasionally. Regardless of if you have a CLII or III hitch, the vehicle can only tow so much, including tongue weight maximums (also VERY important). I installed my own 2" receiver (etrailer, Curt brand) hitch with wiring for under $200. The profile (ie: height) of the trailer especially at speed will also effect your towing capacity - those tall Uhaul box trailers create a lot of wind drag , and thats all the more load on your tow vehicle you must consider. Also bear in mind the family/gear IN your vehicle essentially detracts from what you can safely tow outside the vehicle. Weight distribution in your (any) trailer is absolutely essential to safe towing- with an approximate 10% of the gross trailer weight as tongue weight (1500 lb trailer/load = 150lbs tongue weight needed). If the tongue weight is neutral to negative- the trailer will probably sway dangerously behind you, and this also creates a very dangerous situation for unhitching same. Conversely if the tongue weight is excessive, your car's handling will be significantly adversely effected (just as loading about 1000 lbs in the back end would effect it). I would gain a lot of experience towing with lighter loads and without my family on board.
 

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Why cant you tow a Front Wheel drive CRV (or Civic, etc) on a dolly with the fronts off the ground, and the rears coasting along behind the trailer on the ground (which is what they do normally, anyway) ? I am not referring to an AWD vehicle, FWD only......
 
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