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I've always formatted my USB drives to NTFS and never had a single issue. I've heard others say they have had issues, but I haven't, so far.
From what I remember, and from your signature, you don't own a Gen 5 CR-V.
 

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From what I remember, and from your signature, you don't own a Gen 5 CR-V.
The car I own has nothing whatsoever to do with formatting USB drives. No one was the "target" of my reply, which was just a helpful hint for anyone who wants it. By the way, NTFS actually supercedes and is backwards compatible with fat 32, for most all purposes. The common issue with USB drives is that they often don't come pre-formatted. I've made up drives, with music, for many OEM and other car stereos, never had an issue yet. When an issue does crop up,it's most always the poor quality of certain brands' drives, or the fact that some of them don't work with the most common standard USB drivers.
 

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I've been playing with the usb features of my 2017 CRV Touring and trying to determine the limits of the usb port. The largest usb drive I have is 128G. This works fine.

I have tired some usb external drives: 300G, 500G and 1TB.
None of these drives are detected. They do light up with power but I still get the “no usb device detected” message. I tried using them in the two front usb ports with no success.

I have many Movies that I have converted into an Mp4 format (for my phone).
Average size of the files are from 1.5G to 3G. I loaded a few of these unto the 128G usb drive.

Going into the “App List” section
Using “Gallery” the images and movies on the usb drive will show.

While in Park, I am able to play the movies with video and sound.
Once I switch out of Park, it plays the audio of the movie, only.
When I switch back to Park the video resumes in sync with movie.

I would be interested in finding out if a 256G usb flash drive will work before I go out and buy one (they are a little pricey).
I can’t imagine why you would want to try 256G but I guess if you are watching video.......As a biker I must say... please don’t watch video while your car is in motion and am happy this does not seem possible..I bought several tiny, inexpensive sandisk 16G and also colour coded wrist straps for various music types. Need the wrist strap to easily pull the tiny usb out if the port and also to find them in the console. These all work great In either of the two front usb ports.
01F6A98A-81A7-429B-8933-7E4003D2467E.jpeg
Easier for me to go this route rather than try to search music on a large usb. Amazed at how many cd’s I was able to copy on one usb and still only half full.
 

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From what I remember, and from your signature, you don't own a Gen 5 CR-V.
The car I own has nothing whatsoever to do with formatting USB drives. No one was the "target" of my reply, which was just a helpful hint for anyone who wants it. By the way, NTFS actually supercedes and is backwards compatible with fat 32, for most all purposes. The common issue with USB drives is that they often don't come pre-formatted. I've made up drives, with music, for many OEM and other car stereos, never had an issue yet. When an issue does crop up,it's most always the poor quality of certain brands' drives, or the fact that some of them don't work with the most common standard USB drivers.
My point was, and the reason I commented about your vehicle ownership, perhaps in error, was that you commented that you never had an issue with NTSF formats, but you apparently never tried it in a Gen 5 CR-V as you don't own one. So, IF the Gen 5 CR-V has an issue using flash drives, you don't have any experience with this, and this is the issue the OP (bradleyp) is asking for assistance with. That's it.

I haven't used a flash drive in my vehicles in many years, so I cannot give any current experience or assistance with their usage in a Gen 5 CR-V.
 

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I can’t imagine why you would want to try 256G but I guess if you are watching video.......As a biker I must say... please don’t watch video while your car is in motion and am happy this does not seem possible..I bought several tiny, inexpensive sandisk 16G and also colour coded wrist straps for various music types. Need the wrist strap to easily pull the tiny usb out if the port and also to find them in the console. These all work great In either of the two front usb ports. Easier for me to go this route rather than try to search music on a large usb. Amazed at how many cd’s I was able to copy on one usb and still only half full.
I have appr. 2,200 albums of mp3's, in an ever-growing collection, so I have a reason. I also have a 200 Gb microSD card in my phone with all my music on it. My music goes everywhere I go!
 

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My point was, and the reason I commented about your vehicle ownership, perhaps in error, was that you commented that you never had an issue with NTSF formats, but you apparently never tried it in a Gen 5 CR-V as you don't own one. So, IF the Gen 5 CR-V has an issue using flash drives, you don't have any experience with this, and this is the issue the OP (bradleyp) is asking for assistance with. That's it.

I haven't used a flash drive in my vehicles in many years, so I cannot give any current experience or assistance with their usage in a Gen 5 CR-V.
I gotcha! True, but my brother has a late model Camry, and a late model Civic, and my neighbor has a late model CR-V, and I've made drives for all of them with NTFS and no issues yet. So, yeah, I do have experience. But yeah, I don't need it for myself. I just tend to be the go-to guy for friends, neighbors, and relatives. I still do stuff like this for 'em, but I don't fix their computers any more. I had to draw the line somewhere.
 

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I gotcha! True, but my brother has a late model Camry, and a late model Civic, and my neighbor has a late model CR-V, and I've made drives for all of them with NTFS and no issues yet. So, yeah, I do have experience. But yeah, I don't need it for myself. I just tend to be the go-to guy for friends, neighbors, and relatives. I still do stuff like this for 'em, but I don't fix their computers any more. I had to draw the line somewhere.
Fair enough.
 

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I gotcha! True, but my brother has a late model Camry, and a late model Civic, and my neighbor has a late model CR-V, and I've made drives for all of them with NTFS and no issues yet. So, yeah, I do have experience. But yeah, I don't need it for myself. I just tend to be the go-to guy for friends, neighbors, and relatives. I still do stuff like this for 'em, but I don't fix their computers any more. I had to draw the line somewhere.
While in many cases either FAT32 or NTFS will serve a given application.........

Unless you are dealing with single files larger than 4gig, or a drive that exceeds 2 tera bytes, FAT32 works fine. And in fact FAT32 remains more interoperable across various electronic systems than NTFS (which was created specifically so Windows OS could deal with larger file sizes and disk sizes, and some additional file security features). NTFS does have some additional security features in it, but these tend to create more problems than they solve, particularly with mobile media being used across different electronic systems.

NTFS was created to address the emergence of video files often exceeding 4G, and hard disk technology moving beyond 2 Tera bytes.

For removable flash drives... NTFS is not required except for very large video files (greater than 4Gig). It can be used of course, as long as the electronic system you plug it in to recognizes NTFS, and has no issues with any embedded file permissions that may originate on a windows PC and not be compatible with other systems. Not all electronic systems can handle the specific file permissions of NTFS, so you need to know when and where to avoid NTFS, and under what conditions. In this regard, FAT32 is more bullet proof, especially for music libraries.

Most issues CRV owners have appeared to have with usb sticks use is DRMs or other nuance in terms of how the files were created, and/or stored from a Windows PC to a memory stick.

In general.....

Compatibility is probably the main reason why you want to use the FAT32 file system on your USB flash drives or SD cards
. While modern versions of Windows back to Windows XP will support NTFS, other devices you use might not be so accommodating.

  • Macs: Mac OS X now has full read support for NTFS drives, but Macs can’t write to NTFS drives by default. This requires additional software or tweaks.
  • Linux: Linux systems now include solid read/write support for NTFS drives, although this didn’t work well for many years.
  • DVD Players, Smart TVs, Printers, Digital Cameras, Media Players, Smartphones, Anything With a USB Port or SD Card Slot: Here’s where it really starts to get complicated. Many, many devices have USB ports or SD card slots. All these device will be designed to work with FAT32 file systems, so they’ll “just work” and be able to read your files as long as you’re using FAT32. Some devices will work with NTFS, but you can’t count on it — in fact, you should probably assume that most devices can only read FAT32, not NTFS.
This is why you really want to use FAT32 on your removable drives, so you can use them with almost any device. There’s not much to be gained from using NTFS on a USB stick, aside from support for files over 4GB in size.
 

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It is true that fat32 will work in devices where sometimes NTFS won't, but luckily I've not yet run across the issue with a phone or car head unit. Any devices that do not work with NTFS are using antiquated code that would eliminate them from my acceptable hardware list anyway. Otherwise NTFS is far better for use with USB drives as well as compressed audio files. It uses smaller cluster sizes, is 64-bit, provides for less wasted space on a storage drive, and is much faster and far more efficient for all operations involving burning, compression, storage, transfer, etc., whether with large or small files. It also, and this is a biggie, wastes less of my time waiting for operations to complete.

Actually, today most devices will will read and support NTFS. In practice I have not found a single one that won't in the last ten years. Before then, yes, but not since. And I don't care about "almost any device," I only care about my devices, and I don't have anything that old. Fat32 is a fallback always available if I do run across such an issue, but I'd only go there as a last resort, as it is a disadvantage, for me, at least, since I do a lot of ripping, converting, and file transfer and storage. Meanwhile NTFS-formatted drives work in my main machine, my laptop, my tablet, my phone, and my Nikons, except for my old D700, which uses a Compact Flash. DId I mention old?

In the end, I'd always recommend trying NTFS first, as, if it works in the device in question, it is way better. If it doesn't, then go back and re-do the drive with fat32. If you just want to be safe, fat32 works. It's just not nearly as good. Want to test that? Compare moving 200 Gb of files onto a fat 32 drive with the same thing using an NTFS one. Notice how it can take up to four times as long. Not a huge deal for someone who rarely does this stuff. Definitely an issue for those of us that do. 32-bit is never better than 64 in any way, not is it preferable in any situation. Which is why I simply won't own hardware that does not comply with NTFS. And I'm willing to bet the Honda head unit will work with it. Nine times out of ten (or more) the issues involved will not be the formatting, it will be the crappy drive quality.
 
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