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The CRV isn't known to be a powerful vehicle and I find responsiveness sluggish in comparison to my 2004 Mitsubishi Galant. Will using higher-octane gas help increase responsiveness, and improve milage?
 

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The CRV isn't known to be a powerful vehicle and I find responsiveness sluggish in comparison to my 2004 Mitsubishi Galant. Will using higher-octane gas help increase responsiveness, and improve milage?
No. Using a higher octane gas than recommended will only give a placebo effect and provide no increased performance or mileage results.
 

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It will slightly improve mileage...but that is only because you have a lighter wallet.

Using a higher octane will have no impact on power or mileage.
 

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Thank you for the replies so far. I am disappointed and probably should have considered a RAV4 or Escape if I wanted more power.

Regardless, the 2010 CRV is still rated one of the best in it's class and I will take comfort in that.

Thoughts?
 

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Thank you for the replies so far. I am disappointed and probably should have considered a RAV4 or Escape if I wanted more power.

Regardless, the 2010 CRV is still rated one of the best in it's class and I will take comfort in that.

Thoughts?
As with any 4 cylinder car, you have to "get on it" to get the desired result.
 

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The CRV isn't known to be a powerful vehicle and I find responsiveness sluggish in comparison to my 2004 Mitsubishi Galant. Will using higher-octane gas help increase responsiveness, and improve milage?
ha! I put in premium gas in my 07 CRV for 1 year and it cost so much!!! this was back in 07-08 when gas was close to $4/gallon. it was a bad mistake for me to do this. everytime i top if off, my total was arounf $50-60. :-(

now...i can only afford regular.
 

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It helped mine

The CRV isn't known to be a powerful vehicle and I find responsiveness sluggish in comparison to my 2004 Mitsubishi Galant. Will using higher-octane gas help increase responsiveness, and improve milage?
I have a 2010 LX 2WD. Because the engine is high compression, I tried switching over to midgrade gas (89 octane). My highway mileage went up about 4 MPG, and, the car feels more responsive. If you read the owners manual, it indicates 87 octane or higher is OK for this engine. I've not had a chance yet to evaluate 93 octane to see what it does.

Regards:
Oldengineer
 

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I have a 2010 LX 2WD. I tried switching over to midgrade gas (89 octane). My highway mileage went up about 4 MPG, and, the car feels more responsive. If you read the owners manual, it indicates 87 octane or higher is OK for this engine.
Car and Driver tested this Urban Legend a few years ago (one of the cars was a Honda Accord, IIRC) and reported little discernible benefit. Still, whatever floats your boat. :rolleyes:

Are you getting 15 - 20% better performance for the 15 - 20% higher price of PREMIUM?


The only real way to quantify the benefits of using premium is to keep records over several months.
 

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Car and Driver tested this Urban Legend a few years ago (one of the cars was a Honda Accord, IIRC) and reported little discernible benefit. Still, whatever floats your boat. :rolleyes:

Are you getting 15 - 20% better performance for the 15 - 20% higher price of PREMIUM?


The only real way to quantify the benefits of using premium is to keep records over several months.
Nope - I'm running mid grade right now - not premium. I'm getting 16% better gas mileage @ 3.6% higher fuel cost @ local prices so far. Your urban myth is based on low compression engines - not one with 10.5 to 1 like the 2.4 in the 2010 CRV. The other car in my stable, with a high compression V8(10.5 to 1), requires a minimum of 91 Octane gas. Tomorrow, I'm doing a long business trip in the CRV and I'm going to try a tankful of 93 just to see if there's additional improvement. It all depends on how the engine ECM is programmed in this thing. Higher octane probably won't help the older CRV's because they have low compression engines. Anyway, I put over 3K miles on the CRV, running on 87 Octane, and wondering why its fuel economy was consistently much lower than its highway EPA rating.

Regards:
Oldengineer
2010 CRV LX 2WD
2006 Jaguar S-Type 4.2 VDP
 

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Today's cars are smarter than that

See this for a simple explanation, which applies to cars as well: http://www.tiltedhorizons.com/2008/09/which-gasoline-for-my-motorcycle-part-i.html
Today's automobile engines are equipped with knock sensors. As soon as the sensor detects pre-ignition, the car's engine control module retards the timing until it goes away. Since the engine in the 2010 is high compression, I'm just trying to see if the Honda ECM will advance the timing and retune in response to higher octane gas. Before the days of these sophisticated engine controls - if you put regular gas in a high compression engine, the thing would ping like hell, run extremely rough, and run hot. I found out the hard way - I once put some regular gas in my grandfather's new 1966 Oldsmobile Cutlass with the 330 High Performance engine.

Regards:
Oldengineer
 

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Gen 1 owners manual says 86 octane is the minimum. But that engine has far less power than a 10 does. To oversimplify somewhat, octane isn't power, its resistance to premature ignition, a/k/a engine knock. The higher the number, the more resistance to premature ignition it has, so it waits until the flame reaches it and ignites at the proper, controlled time. Higher compression = tighter squeeze inside combustion chamber.

Thus need for higher octane fuel. Its the higher compression that causes more power to be created per combustion stroke. And slightly better fuel economy, too. But you can't increase compression ratio via gasoline. You can mill the head or install slightly longer connecting rods, or a domed piston (as long as it clears the head and valves), but aluminum doesn't react to premium gas.

What can change (and I lack Honda-specific knowledge here) is ignition timing. That, when variable, is sensitive to octane.

Cars have knock sensors (especially turbocharged ones) that advance or retard igition timing depending on whether engine knock is present. Back in the old days, we'd advance timing when running premium knowing that knock wouldn't happen. (We had to use our own ears to detect it back then). I have no idea if 2010 CRV has knock sensor, but with variable valve timing, I suspect it does. So, in theory, you could squeeze a little extra performance out of it, but you're still stuck with factory's compression ratio and parameters of valve timing. So indeed, it is mostly myth that premium gas is a performance panacea in cars designed to run on 87 octane.

In my neck of the woods, premium runs about 20 cents per gallon more than regular. And in wife's turbo Volvo, I don't notice enough difference to pay that extra tab for premium. Recommended in that application for maximum performance, but owners manual concedes that 87 is the minimum octane for it. (Turbo crams air into combustion chamber, effectively acting like compression ratio is higher, and uses more fuel for the mix, so there's more energy there.)

Hope this helps a little. Wish I knew more about 2010 engine.
 

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Nope - I'm running mid grade right now - not premium. I'm getting 16% better gas mileage @ 3.6% higher fuel cost @ local prices so far. Your urban myth is based on low compression engines - not one with 10.5 to 1 like the 2.4 in the 2010 CRV. The other car in my stable, with a high compression V8(10.5 to 1), requires a minimum of 91 Octane gas. Tomorrow, I'm doing a long business trip in the CRV and I'm going to try a tankful of 93 just to see if there's additional improvement. It all depends on how the engine ECM is programmed in this thing. Higher octane probably won't help the older CRV's because they have low compression engines. Anyway, I put over 3K miles on the CRV, running on 87 Octane, and wondering why its fuel economy was consistently much lower than its highway EPA rating.

Regards:
Oldengineer
2010 CRV LX 2WD
2006 Jaguar S-Type 4.2 VDP
Oldengineer:

Any follow-up on how the trip went (gas wise)?

-J
 

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Compression ratio itself doesn't nessesarily determine if higher octane is required. Combustion chanber design, cam profile and timing and ignition timing play a larger role.

Newer motorcycle for example now have ratios reaching 13.3:1. As little at 10 years ago, you would have assumed that race gas of 100 octane or higher would be required for such high compression. Now, those motorcycles run fine on 91 octane, nd can likely tolerate 87 octane.
 

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Mileage is now better.

Oldengineer:

Any follow-up on how the trip went (gas wise)?

-J
I tried one tankful of premium, and, it did nothing for the fuel economy. In addition, gas prices here went up a good bit, so I started running 87 again. At just over 7K miles, I changed the oil in the CRV - putting in Mobil 1 0W-20, a fresh oil filter, and pumped the tires up to 35 psi all around. I headed out on a 600 mile round trip, and, the CRV managed to average just over 29 MPG - on regular gas - for the whole trip. Of course, the weather's gotten warmer, and, it's possible that the gas I bought in Virginia and North Carolina didn't have ethanol in it. Anyway, I was pleased and surprised, and, hope the gas mileage stays up.

Regards:
Oldengineer
 

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Finding fuel without ethanol will do more to improve economy than octane. I find that the $0.10 savings for midgrade with 10% ethanol is a wash when you consider the 5% reducition in fuel economy. The deciding factor for me, is that I get more range out of a tank of 87 than I do a tank of 89 with 10% ethanol. Most of the 91 octane premium around here has ethanol too. In Missouri, they don't mark if hte fuel has ethanol, but you can tell based on price. The ethanol content is not subject to gas taxes so it sells for less. So if you see midgrade cheaper than regular, the regular is probably without ethanol. If the prices are the same or 87 is cheaper, then they both likely have ethanol.

Compression ratio these days, really doesn't have much to do wiht what the minimum octane number is . Combustion chamber and piston design along with cam profiles and ignition timing has a much, much greater impact. Most hybrids these days are 12:1 to 13:1 compression. The CVT's in these cars allow them to operate the engine in such a way that knocking won't occur, and the ocmpustion chambers are designed to prevent knock as well.

Some motorcycles are now pushing 13.5:1 compression but can run fine on 91 octane... some still allow even 87 octane thanks to knock sensors. 10-15 years ago, anything over 12.5:1 likely needed race gas.
 

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Everybody's selling gas with ethanol here.

I travel a good bit for business, and, in my state, everybody's selling ethanol laced gas now. All the pumps have a sticker on them that indicate the fuel contains up to 10% ethanol. Our gas is more expensive that the surrounding states as well. Another ripoff foisted on us by our state government.

Regards:
Oldengineer
 

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in general, modern vehicles that require premium fuel have the necessary electronics to retard the timing if regular fuel is used. however, modern vehicles that only require regular generally don't know what to do w/ premium fuel and don't advance the timing to take advantage of it.
another tidbit of info, there's actually more energy/gal of low octane fuel than for high octane fuel, which has extra "stuff" added to make it burn slower.
 

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Gas

in general, modern vehicles that require premium fuel have the necessary electronics to retard the timing if regular fuel is used. however, modern vehicles that only require regular generally don't know what to do w/ premium fuel and don't advance the timing to take advantage of it.
another tidbit of info, there's actually more energy/gal of low octane fuel than for high octane fuel, which has extra "stuff" added to make it burn slower.
Haaaa..at least you don't live in the communist state of Maryland, gas isn't the only issue here!!!
 
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