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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm new here. sorry I didn't search up and down this site for the answer, but my computer runs slow, and it's very laborious to do that, with all the ads slowing it down further.
Anyway, I own a 2002 auto 2WD w 185k miles on it. I have always used 87 octane no problem. Just lately though I've noticed intermittent pinging of the valves like the old days of V8s when the octane was too low. So I put in some high-test gas, and it does resolve the pinging. Recurs when gas is consumed and I revert to 87 octane; responds again w new infusion of higher octane, so it's not my imagination. But what does this mean?
I have done little preventive work except the usual LOF, tranny service (60k miles ago), etc. Long ago the O2 sensors went out and my mileage dropped from 27 to 24 MPG, but I thought then it would take a lot of gas saving to recoup the $400+ price tag the dealer wanted for a new one, so never got around to it. But that was years before this pinging started.
After scanning this forum, I DO have a preventative timing chain tensioner change scheduled tomorrow along with 3 recalls I've neglected. Should I get the valves adjusted too? (I never did the 105k $500+ maintenance service).
 

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Have the valves adjusted for proper maintenance. I would suggest to use Seafoam to clean out the carbon build up on top of the piston. As carbon build up sounds like the problem you are having. If there is a lot of carbon build up on top of the piston it will increase the compression ratio of the engine. This in turn will make the engine ping if you use lower octane fuel. But if you use higher octane fuel it will prevent the pinging but you will loose efficiency as higher octane gas will be harder to burn. Was anything done before this happened?
 

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The primary O2 sensor (use Denso, not Bosch) can be purchased online for around $100 and the hardest part is getting the old one off. With the proper tools etc, no big deal. There are vids on youtube for doing that job on a 2002 crv.
A malfunctioning Primary (Upsteam) O2 sensor can cause a richer mixture, lower mpg, and carbon fouling of the valves and cyl heads and piston tops and also, cause an early death of the catalytic converter (costly). Replace that O2 sensor ASAP!!!
You may need new spark plugs, if so, replace them with NGK (NGK 6994 IZFR6K-11 Laser Iridium Plug) and not Bosch, etc for best results.
Recheck spark plug number to make sure it is the right one.
Yes, the valve lash adjustment is not difficult overall, and should be checked, considering the mileage. Dealers charge WAY to much for doing those things.
Buffalo4
 

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Welcome to the forum, great advise and suggestions from both Otto888man and Buffalo4, you can put in in the bank.
On a side note, I had no idea that a winter blend as well as a summer blend gasoline existed until I heard it on the news recently. I have always had my opinion of oil companies. On the pumps for 87 octane it also says +/- 2 rm, so that could mean your getting 85 or 89 octane. I just try to buy my gas @ a really busy place in order to get hopefully FRESH quality. Don't forget the previous maintenance tip's, it will save you in the long run. Good luck,
David g.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the service dept person (former mechanic) seemed perplexed that I wanted a timing chain tensioner change though was experiencing no symptoms. Is failure of this a rare thing? Am I wasting money??
Also, how many O2 sensors are there, and which/all should I replace? I can try this one myself, if I know what to order at the parts counter.
The garage also wanted $50 to read off the codes on my CEL, which has been on for years, and no doubt several stacked codes by now. Is THIS worth it??
thanks to all who replied; very helpful.
 

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Why change the timing chain tensioner, unless it is indicated? If the timing is out of sync, then you might have to change the chain and tensioner.
You can buy your own code reader for less than $50.
Besides that, many auto parts stores read it for free.
Yes, the codes can help a lot.
Overall it is the primary (before the cat converter) O2 sensor that determines the air fuel ratio, and that is the one the usually needs replacement.
Buffalo4
 

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Here is a Denso primary (upstream) O2 sensor for $52.18 with shipping : http://www.partsgeek.com/cart/
Part #Part Number: 6025-05051528 from PartsGeek.com http://www.partsgeek.com/catalog/2001/honda/crv/fuel_injection/oxygen_sensor.html
I never bought from them and . if you buy online, make sure it is the correct Denso # for the Primary (Upstream) O2 sensor for a 2001 Honda CRV.
If you search, you can find good deals on them.
http://www.walmart.com/ip/34185964?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227022989168&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=42974916512&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=81467390792&veh=sem Denso Oxygen Sensor, #234-4011
Again, check the quality and number and use Denso or NGK but not Bosch for your CRV.
Buffalo4
 
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