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I hear the V-Tec locks the valves together at around 4,500RPM. If one were to install a V-Tec head onto a stock CRV's B20Z(USDM) engine, it wouldn't be an advantage would it? Even with a 5 speed I don't reach 4,500.....more like 3,000 RPM... I'm not sure if V-Tec would even kick in driving around in a CRV normally.

So why do I see V-Tec in newer CRV's? does the V-Tec kick in in lower RPM or something?
 

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sounds like it's not for you. a stock gsr doesn't engauge v-tec untill 6k-6200. when your working with small displacement all motor the only way to make HP is to spin it. your vtec crossover point can be set at any rpm. however when speaking of B series vtec you essentially have two camshafts. the small cam keeps vaccum, driveability, fuel economy in mind, then the big cam is for top end power. a b20vtec would most likely want a sooner engaugement point and a good tuner would tune the car on both cams and find where the hp/tq are equal then set that as the turn on point. example one car i've built wanted vtec as soon as 2800 rpms. but that an extreme example as it's a monster(big turbo, ported head, 84.5x89 on e85) honda has different form's of vtec also. some are a 12/16 valve arrangement (keeps one intake valve closed in the lower rpms and opens the second later to promote cylinder swirl/more effective combustion) then there's ones that incorporate variable cam timing, multi lob cam changing, and the 12/16 valve arangement all in one.
 
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