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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The car has 32000Km(20000miles) of which 90% is traffic free highway driving.

Twice a year when changing summer/winter tires, the car has the brake service done. This involves cleaning the caliper bracket and pad retainers, M-77 paste is always applied including lubing the caliper pins and M-77 Paste on the brake pad backing plates and shims. My wheels are always torqued to 80lb-ft, never with an impact gun.

2 weeks ago I heard a clunking sound coming from the right rear when I would come to a very slow stop (like arriving to my driveway).

After a test drive and my mechanic sitting in the back listening, the mechanic suspected the rotor was warped. Initial inspection showed the rotor to have little wear and it was plenty thick, he was surprised. The rotor was not scarred or had burn spots. The pads, like the front, have 80-90% thickness. He said one small possibility maybe the rotor got hot and water hit it since it was raining a lot that week.

He took the wheel off, with a jig(a Dial Indicator)that you clamp on, it indicated that the rotor was warped. He ordered an OEM rotor, installed it, relubed with M-77 Assembly Paste etc...

No more noise, everything sounds like before.

This week, the left rear is doing the same thing.

I cannot believe I may have another rear rotor gone.

I only drove on dry roads, no rain, and hit no puddles this week. I baby all my cars and the pads are thick and like new.

I've had an Accord and a Pilot and I've always managed to get over 70km(43000miles) on rear rotors, in fact on my wife’s 2004 Pilot, the rear rotors where changed at 102Km(63000miles) and the rear pads at 72km(45000miles).

Please HELP!!!! How the heck did I warp 2 rotors at such low mileage?

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Some Pictures

The first picture shows the brand new rotor from last week on the right rear,its OEM as you can see from the black paint on the hub part.

The second picture is the left rear rotor that is the one that is now doing the same clunking sound when stopping slowly as the right rear did which turned out to be the warped rotor.

The 3rd, 4th, 5th picture is the pad of the left rear, look how much meat its got, nowhere near being worn.

The only thing I can think of is that somehow the caliper, although pins are lubed, doesn't release correctly and possibly the rotor gets too hot and warps. What I can't figure out is, if that is the case, how come the pads have hardly any wear, you would think that if the rotor got so hot that it warped, then the pads should be pretty much worn.
 

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There is the possibility that both rotors were warped/out of spec for "runout" when they were new. I would still expect that you would feel the drag (or smell the pads) with the small engine that we have, but since it's been like that since new, maybe not. You are doing way more than most with respect to looking after the vehicle so don't blame yourself in any way. Just for curiosities sake it would be nice to check the fronts too.
 

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You seem to live where the roads are salted in winter. This has lead to rust build-up on the edges of the rotors, which can cause a vibration under braking.

Rather than replace, why not "true" the rotors? The metal taken off should be minimal if they are true already. The lathing will remove the rusty bits. (pits do not need to be removed...only the rust "blooms" that are higher than the braking surface).


++++++++++++++

PS: my experience leads me to state that the clunking is NOT because the rotors are warped. Probably, the caliper guide pins or the SS edge guides were mixed up and put in the wrong locations during service.

I've mixed them up myself. :eek:
 

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Maybe the shop would be able to true the rotor for free to resolve the issue (and find a cure for it). Follow-ups are a pain, but if the issue is solved the customer remembers it and gives referrals to friends. And in this case, a customer who pays attention to their vehicle. It's definitely not their fault, and the shop gets stuck in the loop. CODB for a shop.

Speaking of, I'd still take notice of any new smells near that brake for awhile.

A few years back I had the pads changed on a 2000 MB C230, and afterward it squeeled like ancient bus brakes. We had ordered in the OEM pads, and as we found out a week later (a noisy week!) they were incompatible with the original rotors on the car. Mercedes had changed the rotor and pad material because of the problem we had - warping. We wound up buying a set of rotors to replace perfectly good turned original rotors. With no discount given, to correct a problem in their design - lovely. In hindsight, I could've just thrown aftermarket pads on it and tossed the OEM in the trash. But I wanted the car to be right, and I was stuck with the bill.

In short, there are warranty clauses for wear items but there's always pleasing the customer and making them happy with their cars.

ps. That is a CRAZY amount of rust for a 2009! They must be using acid and gravel on the roads to cause that in a few short years.
 

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I know some modern cars have experienced warped roters from over torqued lug nuts. This was common on some SAABs and it was recomended that the lugs be tightened by hand only. That's pretty much all I've got.
 
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