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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a confusing problem.

Rarely when I brake, the steering wheel will vibrate back and forth, classic for a warped front rotor.

However, my problem is that it happens, maybe only once or twice or never during a car trip. Intermittent and infrequent. Can be at any speed, but only during braking

Still assume its a rotor and have them machined? Or look for something else?
 

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It could be improperly worn brakes as well, or one of the brakes in the front is completely worn out, as well as it could be an alignment issue. It's not hard to pop the wheels off and check to see if they're warped.



 

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My guess is that a rotor is out of spec.

Replace the front rotors, install new pads, shims, use anti-squeal on the pad backs and clips.

My other guesses.....
1. sticking front caliper-remove, grease or replace slide pins, reinstall (this really should be done with every brake service)
2. Alignment out of spec.
3. Check tire pressures

Also, I wouldn't turn or machine the rotors. Most modern day rotors don't benefit from this service but I'm sure someone will disagree.
 

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Vibration could be a bad axle (constant velocity joint).

Although, if your pads are more than half worn down, the rotors could be causing the vibration intermittently...due to the heat. (Thick pads dissipate brake heat better)

Just my W.A.G.s :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Update:

After retorquing the lug nuts 3 times with minimal changes, I decided to look at everything again. Suspension seemed fine again, but I noticed a bit of rust on the brake pad/mounting bracket junction. Cleaned up the area, but I didnt have any grease on hand, so I lubricated with some 5w20 for the time being. Seems to have solved the vibration issue.
 

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There is a special high temp grease to lube up the caliper bolts. There is also a high temp anti-squeal that you can put on shims and the backs of pads to reduce brake noise.

5w20 should not be use for this purpose. Make you you don't get any grease on the pad face or rotor face, unless you like extra long stopping distances.
 

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If the caliper is sticking, when you get done driving for an extended period in the city the caliper will be hotter than normal to the touch. Lube the pins and that should fix the problem if that is it. If the rotors are warped, replace them. Don't machine them. You will be lucky to get another 20k out of them after machining and that is wasting your money. Always make sure you properly torque the lug nuts when you take the wheels off.
 

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On the sliding surfaces of calipers (ways I suppose in proper terminology) I always applied lead-based anti seize when I did a brake job. You don't use the brush, that will apply way too much, you put about a small tiny drop on your finger tip and run it along the surface to prevent corrosion from hanging up the piston assembly.

Now that was when calipers where cast iron and the "frame" they rode on was steel. I'd guess to prevent inviting corrosion that for all aluminum systems just some molydisulfide grease (again, you just touch the surface of the grease with your finger tip and then rub it along the sliding surface) would do the trick.

If lead based anti-seize is ok for aluminum it will probably last a lot longer though. I don't know if it is but my instinct says not.
 
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