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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My CR-V was assembled in September 2018 and the dealer offered Cilajet treatment as a purchase inducement. Might be snake oil, might be useful, but whatever... water beads up nicely and it cleans easily leaving a smooth finish.

Over we the weekend we drove 4 hours in heavy snow, slush and treated road conditions and I desperately want to clean the car but it's not warm enough.

What about a car wash with brushes? I've always been told wait 6 months before subjecting a finish to such treatment.

Thoughts?

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Hi!

Any automated car wash is guaranteed to leave finite scratches/regular scratches on your CR- V despite your paint sealant, and can even chip your paint in some cases, because of the dirt that builds up on those automated car wash brushes over time. I’ve personally never taken my CR-V to the car wash yet just because the ones near my home have bad reviews and I like doing it myself, but when I used to get my Camry washed at the car wash, I’d make sure that I’d be one of the first ones there because generally the rags/brushes they would use first thing in the morning were cleaner than they would be any other time of the day. So if you want to take yours to a car wash, I’d recommend going early in the morning.

Hope this helps!

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
See if there is a touchless car wash near you.
There are touchless car washes around and those would certainly get the grit off and help with the salt, although the finish is always left with a film. Still, that's an option to at least have a respectable vehicle if all other options fail. I have found a detailing company who washes cars by hand (inside, so below freezing temp is no problem) but it's 20 miles away. Cost is $35.00, which I think is reasonable for that service here in the DC area, but considering it will snow again in a few days, seems a bit much.
 

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There are touchless car washes around and those would certainly get the grit off and help with the salt, although the finish is always left with a film. Still, that's an option to at least have a respectable vehicle if all other options fail. I have found a detailing company who washes cars by hand (inside, so below freezing temp is no problem) but it's 20 miles away. Cost is $35.00, which I think is reasonable for that service here in the DC area, but considering it will snow again in a few days, seems a bit much.
If you care about your car's paint finish, NEVER EVER take it through an automatic car wash with brushes.

When it is cold, use the automatic touchless car wash or DIY coin-op car wash to get the salt/grit/grime off.
It is much better to leave that film on the car than to scrub it off in an automatic car wash with brushes, which will leave behind lots of scratches/marring/swirls.

This is what I do...
- Every fall, detail your car and protect the exterior with a good synthetic sealant (Sonax PNS and BSD combo is incredible)
- When it's too cold for a normal wash, use the high-pressure rinse at a coin-op car wash to get the grit/grime/salt off. Then use a blower (battery or gas-powered leaf blower) to blow all the water off, which will prevent any water spots and make the car look really good.
- When the temps get a bit higher, do a proper car wash yourself at home.
 

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My CR-V was assembled in September 2018 and the dealer offered Cilajet treatment as a purchase inducement. Might be snake oil, might be useful, but whatever... water beads up nicely and it cleans easily leaving a smooth finish.

Over we the weekend we drove 4 hours in heavy snow, slush and treated road conditions and I desperately want to clean the car but it's not warm enough.

What about a car wash with brushes? I've always been told wait 6 months before subjecting a finish to such treatment.

Thoughts?

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If you really want to protect look into having it Ceramic Coated. I've done 5 cars so far and they all look great! Find a shop or wait until the spring. Their is nothing hard about doing it yourself its just time consuming. Wash, wash again, Wipe down with Alcohol, apply coating and wipe off. It won't stop scratches when washing your car but it sure helps. Your paint will probably need to paint "Corrected" Swirls and fine scratches removed before you ceramic coat. I did my CR-V back in the spring and it ran it thru many car washes without any scratches. Did my Saab about two years ago and I just did my Pilot. I prefer "CarPro Cquartz" do a google search, lots of great reviews and a couple real good YT videos on how to apple it.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byKcYsEyWGk&t=7s


.
 

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My car dealer washes my car whenever I bring it in for service. I will have to take a look at the washer next time I am there.
Also, all new cars are washed before being displayed and being sold.
 

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My car dealer washes my car whenever I bring it in for service. I will have to take a look at the washer next time I am there.
Also, all new cars are washed before being displayed and being sold.
Always decline the free dealer wash. Usually they use a brush that’s filthy and causes scratches or they have their own cloth wash which will also scratch your paint.


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Yeah car washes are not the best thing for a new car. If you keep it long enough that it has accumulated a whole bunch of scratches and swirl marks then it probably wont make much of a difference. When it's new you will notice any paint defect.

What I do is use a foam jet and foam down the whole vehicle (takes about 3 minutes)
This stuff:https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003TPW5YM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Then I let it sit for 5 minutes to soak under the dirt and then rinse it off. This gets off all the larger particles that will leave swirl marks.

I then use the old two bucket method and a micro fiber mitten soaked in a good soap.
This guy:https://www.amazon.com/Chemical-Guys-MIC_493-Microfiber-Scratch-Free/dp/B003TTL0TE/ref=pd_bxgy_263_img_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B003TTL0TE&pd_rd_r=13752343-1951-11e9-adb7-79da964e28a8&pd_rd_w=Y0EPp&pd_rd_wg=CEsM4&pf_rd_p=6725dbd6-9917-451d-beba-16af7874e407&pf_rd_r=9HYMCP6WRND53T1HEC3J&psc=1&refRID=9HYMCP6WRND53T1HEC3J

After that I rinse it off and then wash the rims using an older micro fiber cloth.

I then dry the body off with at least two high quality micro fiber cloths and that's it.

Once every 3-4 months I Wax down the vehicle with two coats after washing it.

Rob
 

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Luckily where I live it never stays cold very long. In my shop I have a 3400psi pressure washer. I also have a nice large soft sponge. And twice a year, or whenever it needs it, it gets a nice gentle hand wax and manual polish. Never use a powered buffer. Paint these days is too thin and easily damaged. Always do anything by hand. Don't buy the hype of ceramic or other space age snake oil (all that stuff is all hype and no good), just good quality paste or liquid wax is good, hand applied and hand buffed.
 

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If you care about your car's paint finish, NEVER EVER take it through an automatic car wash with brushes.
Easier said then done for a lot of people. I don't know where you live my the water to my outside faucets gets turned off the first freeze in October and doesn't get turned back on until April Lol
 

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Luckily where I live it never stays cold very long. In my shop I have a 3400psi pressure washer. I also have a nice large soft sponge. And twice a year, or whenever it needs it, it gets a nice gentle hand wax and manual polish. Never use a powered buffer. Paint these days is too thin and easily damaged. Always do anything by hand. Don't buy the hype of ceramic or other space age snake oil (all that stuff is all hype and no good), just good quality paste or liquid wax is good, hand applied and hand buffed.
For the truly OCD like myself, pressure washing in any form, with or without brushes is a big hell no. If the car is not pretty clean to begin with, you are basically sand blasting the clear coat with high pressure spray.

2 bucket washing by hand or nothing.
 

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Luckily where I live it never stays cold very long. In my shop I have a 3400psi pressure washer. I also have a nice large soft sponge. And twice a year, or whenever it needs it, it gets a nice gentle hand wax and manual polish. Never use a powered buffer. Paint these days is too thin and easily damaged. Always do anything by hand. Don't buy the hype of ceramic or other space age snake oil (all that stuff is all hype and no good), just good quality paste or liquid wax is good, hand applied and hand buffed.
Ceramic coatings are not hype or snake oil. Ceramic coatings offer better protection than waxes or sealants, hands down. They also last much longer – usually multiple years. Many professional grade coatings even offer warranties. They repel dirt and water like nothing else, which makes them easier to clean. Their hardness helps to prevent swirl marks and marring from washing

Here's a good article about the pluses and minuses of ceramic coatings....


http://canadiangearhead.com/paint-protection-ceramic-coating-worth-it/

https://www.bestnetreview.com/best-ceramic-coating-for-cars/
 

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Ceramic coatings are not hype or snake oil. Ceramic coatings offer better protection than waxes or sealants, hands down. They also last much longer – usually multiple years. Many professional grade coatings even offer warranties. They repel dirt and water like nothing else, which makes them easier to clean. Their hardness helps to prevent swirl marks and marring from washing
Ceramic coatings are simply not practical or cost effective for most people with modestly priced, daily driven cars like the CR-V.

Such coatings are better-suited for...
  • Enthusiasts (lots of experience & the necessary tools/products)
  • Those with a garage queen/weekend car (pampered, not driven often)
  • Higher end cars (car afford a professional detailer to apply/maintain the coating)
Coatings are expensive and require an enormous amount of prep...
  • Decon wash, iron remover, tar remover, clay bar, full machine polish, IPA wipedown. This is all before you get to the careful application of the coating.
  • The vast majority of consumers do not have the skill or products needed to effectively apply and maintain a coating.
  • A professional will charge WAY more than is practical for a car like this.
Secondly, they don't last all that much longer than MUCH cheaper and MUCH easier alternatives.
  • In a perfect world with ideal conditions, you MIGHT get a few years out of them.
  • The reality is, a CR-V is a daily driver that is exposed to lots of elements and is NOT meticulously maintained, so you won't get that much longevity.
There is lots of info on forums like Autogeek and hundreds of videos on Youtube. For an average consumer, there is no way I would recommend a ceramic coating, even if you had money to burn. There are products on the market that will give you similar protection & longevity at a fraction of the cost and time.

A combo like Sonax Polymer Net Shield and Sonax Brilliant Shine Detailer will give you amazing results that will easily last 6 months. The best part is, it is extremely simple/quick to apply, and is dirt cheap.
 

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Ceramic coatings are simply not practical or cost effective for most people with modestly priced, daily driven cars like the CR-V.

Such coatings are better-suited for...
  • Enthusiasts (lots of experience & the necessary tools/products)
  • Those with a garage queen/weekend car (pampered, not driven often)
  • Higher end cars (car afford a professional detailer to apply/maintain the coating)
Coatings are expensive and require an enormous amount of prep...
  • Decon wash, iron remover, tar remover, clay bar, full machine polish, IPA wipedown. This is all before you get to the careful application of the coating.
  • The vast majority of consumers do not have the skill or products needed to effectively apply and maintain a coating.
  • A professional will charge WAY more than is practical for a car like this.
Secondly, they don't last all that much longer than MUCH cheaper and MUCH easier alternatives.
  • In a perfect world with ideal conditions, you MIGHT get a few years out of them.
  • The reality is, a CR-V is a daily driver that is exposed to lots of elements and is NOT meticulously maintained, so you won't get that much longevity.
There is lots of info on forums like Autogeek and hundreds of videos on Youtube. For an average consumer, there is no way I would recommend a ceramic coating, even if you had money to burn. There are products on the market that will give you similar protection & longevity at a fraction of the cost and time.

A combo like Sonax Polymer Net Shield and Sonax Brilliant Shine Detailer will give you amazing results that will easily last 6 months. The best part is, it is extremely simple/quick to apply, and is dirt cheap.

Sorry but your simply wrong. Their are many Ceramic coating kits which can be bought for $50-$100. When done correct its not much more work than properly waxing a car. Wash, Clay / Wash and usually wipe down with alcohol and apply the product.

I don't think your giving the average owner enough credit. Their is nothing hard about, just takes a little more effort than a good waxing.......and will last a whole lot longer

Lets just agree to disagree LOL
 

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Sorry but your simply wrong. Their are many Ceramic coating kits which can be bought for $50-$100. When done correct its not much more work than properly waxing a car. Wash, Clay / Wash and usually wipe down with alcohol and apply the product.

I don't think your giving the average owner enough credit. Their is nothing hard about, just takes a little more effort than a good waxing.......and will last a whole lot longer

Lets just agree to disagree LOL
I have all the tools to do it. I don't know if I have the willpower.

You should be doing a claybar every couple years as it stands. So yeah adding a coating isn't too big of a deal.
 

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Sorry but your simply wrong. Their are many Ceramic coating kits which can be bought for $50-$100. When done correct its not much more work than properly waxing a car. Wash, Clay / Wash and usually wipe down with alcohol and apply the product.

I don't think your giving the average owner enough credit. Their is nothing hard about, just takes a little more effort than a good waxing.......and will last a whole lot longer
You proved my point about pricing. You can certainly buy some kits for $75-$100. But that will get you one, maybe two applications.
So your cost will be 20-30 TIMES MORE per application than something like PNS+BSD. And if it is applied the way you suggest, it won't last much longer, if any.

Can you post links to the ceramic coating kits that "just takes a little more effort than a good waxing"?

One of the most popular coatings on the market is Cquartz UK 3.0. This is a new formulation that makes it even "easier" to use.
Here are the tips and instructions for the product. I'll let readers decide if this is comparable to a simple wax...

Tips:
If contamination exists, Iron X and clay your vehicle before polishing.
To gain the most from Cquartz your vehicle should have all surfaces 100% clean and paint polished to a high level
Use CarPro Reflect to achieve an incredible high gloss finish in less time with no fillers
Use CarPro Eraser to remove any oils leftover after polishing - This is critical to ensure durability of CQuartz
We recommend Coating Removal Towels: CarPro 2 Face (No Lint) 16" x 16" - Blue/ Orange 10 Pack, Microfiber Madness Slogger (16" x 16") or Edgeless White Polish Towel - 16" x 16"
We recommend Extra Suede Applicators if applying more than 1 coat - CarPro Suede MicroFiber Applicator 4"x4" 10 PACK
Finding the right time to "level" (wipe off) excess coating after it flashes:
  • Start with a single 2ft x 2ft test section to determine flash time before applying coating to entire vehicle. Flash time will vary depending on temperature, humidity, air movement, paint type, how thick it is applied, and more.
  • If coating is applied thick then the coating will take longer to flash. If applied thin it will flash faster. Hot temps will cause it to flash faster, Cold Temps will cause it to flash slower. Air movement will cause it to flash faster.
  • When it starts to flash you will see colors that will make the coating look like a rainbow or oil slick. You will see hints of blue, purple, red, and yellow.
  • Remove too soon and it will be oily with no grab to it when wiping. If you wipe off too soon it will not give the coating a chance to bond.
  • Remove too late and it becomes hard to remove.
  • The time to remove is when you feel just a little push back or "grab" against your towel but it is not difficult to remove and it is no longer oily. It may leave some streaks at first but with the second wipe of a fresh clean side of the towel, the streaks should wipe off and the paint should be nice and clear.
  • Lighting - Lighting is key to make sure you wipe off completely when you do wipe off. You don't want spot lighting like would use on paint correction but ambient lighting. Look at the paint from different angles to make sure none of the coating is missed. Spot lighting will "wash out" the high spots visually. Think of it like this: when you wipe off a sealant you have hours to go and check it again outside or in other lighting. In this case you need to pay attention as you go rather then wait an hour. Thorough removal of the coating is very necessary as any product left on the surface will harden and require polishing to remove soon after.
  • Cquartz UK 3.0 – Depending on the environment you are working in, it may start to become somewhat difficult to remove within the first 2-4 mins. It may feel tacky and or super grippy and it will smear and leave streaking. If that happens you will want to wait an additional 1 min and do a small test wipe to check. Continue checking in 1 min increments until coating wipes off clean and easy.
  • High spots - A high spot is excess coating that was not leveled (wiped off). Most of the time it will look like an application mark. If you discover to them within minutes then a bit more product will lift them. Otherwise you would use a dot of finishing polish such as CarPro Essence or Reflect and rub the high spot off, wipe it down with Eraser or your IPA of choice, and then re-coat that area and onto the area around it by about 6". Then start wiping off the perimeter immediately and slowly work inwards to feather it until you reach the area you are trying to re-coat at the appropriate time.
Directions: Use only in good ambient lighting

Precautions:
Do not apply in direct sun or on hot surface
Do not re-use 4" Suede applicators
Do not re-use the towels you used to buff off with on paint
Wear hand protection
Wear respiratory protection such as painters mask

Read "Tips" above before coating
Wrap a 4" mf Suede around the grey side of applicator block.
Shake CQuartz UK.
Slowly open bottle and drag one or two lines of product down the applicator.
Spread across paint in a criss cross pattern approximately 2 sq ft at a time depending on conditions.
Buff off as soon as it flashes (within 2-5 minutes depending - see tips above) using a CarPro No Lint Ultra Towel 16" x 16".
Be sure to remove all excess residue and only then do you move to the next section.
Switch out the 4" Suedes every 2+/- panels.
Additional coats may be applied with 45-60 minutes or wait until the following day if you are beyond 60 minutes. CarPro recommends 2 coats. Max Layer - 3 coats.
Apply Reload after final coat within 30- 60 mins. Wait until next day for Reload if you miss the 30-60 minute window or at least a minimum of 12 hrs.

After Tips:
Keep surface dry for at least one hour after application (For best results keep dry 24 hours)
Gently wipe any water off the surface during the first 24 hours after application
Avoid detergents and chemicals for 5 days after application
If it is dry and the air is clean outside then you may park the vehicle in direct sun after application to speed the curing.

Coating Maintenance:
The best thing to do is start using CarPro Reset to wash with regularly. Other soaps can leave residue that temporarily messes up the beading and allows dust and dirt to stick more readily.
Wash Mitt:
Microfiber Madness Incredimitt 
(Recommended for daily drivers and most cars - This mitt is easiest to maintain and is extremely durable as well as washing out most easily)
Merino Wool Wash Mitt (Recommended if car has extremely soft paint or car does not get extremely dirty)
Drying Towel: CarPro or Microfiber Madness
Quick Detailing
: CarPro ECH2o Concentrate and Microfiber Madness Crazy Pile towels (need about 3-6 towels)
Occasionally (every 3 to 6 months) decontaminate surface with CarPro Iron X. Use during wash cycle (after Reset) and as directed
If using CarPro Reload as topper: use every 3-12 months, for special occasions or any time you like.
 

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One of the most popular coatings on the market is Cquartz UK 3.0. This is a new formulation that makes it even "easier" to use.
Here are the tips and instructions for the product.
Like many products the instructions are over the top.
Here are my cliff notes from another post using the same product

Start to finish on the CR-V was about 4 hours. Like I said their is nothing hard about doing it, the coating is the simplest, apply it, let it kick and wipe off...

The hardest part is starting with a clean car.

Wash, I like Dawn dish soap because its strips any wax
Clay the car
Quick wash again
Wipe down with Alcohol
Apply coating, wipe / buff off

Literally Dozens of video showing how easy it is to do.... https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cquartz+uk+coating
 

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Best to just give a good coat of wax annually, wash the car weekly by hand if possible. I also clay my car yearly before waxing. This would not prevent rust but keeps the car looking great. The odd car wash in the winter is fine (yup even brushes) No rust on my 2004 tsx, at least no visible surface rust..nor swirls..silver colour is best as it does not show marks. No undercoating or rustproofing as well for me. And yes, park further out in parking lots, preferably at the end of rows :)
Not crazy about high pressure washes as these can work into headlamps etc.
 
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