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Discussion Starter #1
I checked the oil level for the first time yesterday. My CR-V is brand new with just 136 miles on it. Much to my surprise, I pulled out the dipstick and just about laughed my head off. What has happened to the traditional dipstick with the big flat bar that makes seeing the level so easy? Now these bright engineers have developed one with a bit of yellow plastic on the end with two small holes. I don't know about you, but how on earth can one see a proper level on that thing? Maybe there are those out there that are OK with it. But really, why can't they just stay with what works and is easy to see the oil level at a glance.
 

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When the Gen5 first came out many owners had trouble reading oil level on the orange dipstick, so you are not alone. ;)

There are topics about it somewhere here.
 

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Keep checking frequently, the oil will get darker rather quickly, making the oil level easier to see on the dipstick.

A light tap or two with a hammer converts the dipstick to old school.
138069
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Keep checking frequently, the oil will get darker rather quickly, making the oil level easier to see on the dipstick.

A light tap or two with a hammer converts the dipstick to old school.
View attachment 138069
Thank you for your reply. So by hitting the yellow plastic doohicky with a hammer, it will come off?
 

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Keep checking frequently, the oil will get darker rather quickly, making the oil level easier to see on the dipstick.

A light tap or two with a hammer converts the dipstick to old school.
View attachment 138069

And before some asks.. NO... doing so does not void the vehicle warranty..... though I doubt Honda will replace the dipstick after it's been hammered... not that anyone that takes the time to hammer the orange plastic off will want a new dipstick of course. :)

On a more serious note... like so many new things in life.. it just takes a little adjusting to. Once you are used to checking your oil levels.. which honestly everyone should do at least every time they fuel up... it not a big deal. You are a human being...and most human beings are more adaptable than they are rebels with a cause.
 

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Thank you for your reply. So by hitting the yellow plastic doohicky with a hammer, it will come off?
Yes, it will come off.......in several pieces.

......... not that anyone that takes the time to hammer the orange plastic off will want a new dipstick of course. :)..........
I would/did. Dirt cheap online.

138070
 

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......and only on the 1.5L, not the 2.4L, from what I understand.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
And before some asks.. NO... doing so does not void the vehicle warranty..... though I doubt Honda will replace the dipstick after it's been hammered... not that anyone that takes the time to hammer the orange plastic off will want a new dipstick of course. :)

On a more serious note... like so many new things in life.. it just takes a little adjusting to. Once you are used to checking your oil levels.. which honestly everyone should do at least every time they fuel up... it not a big deal. You are a human being...and most human beings are more adaptable than they are rebels with a cause.
I'm sure one will get used to it. My first impression was, "what a stupid looking dipstick." I've checked it again and it is still hard to read. Perhaps a flashlight on it might help. With all the cars I have owned, I've had no issue with reading the dipstick until now. Why can't they keep them the same. If something works, why the need to fix it. Bloody engineers have to tinker with everything for tinkering sake. They just can't leave things along. I know, I worked with engineers, and they can be a bloody pain in the a$$ at times.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, it will come off.......in several pieces.



I would/did. Dirt cheap online.

View attachment 138070
Thank you for the picture. Looking at the two, for me, the top one will be easier to read. Perhaps I will order a replacement and knock that plastic thingy off. When I go for an oil change, I'll just replace it with the original so as to not create a problem at the dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The $1000 question still stands at: why is honda putting this added cost on the dipstick?
Why? Because engineers are not happy unless they can tinker with everything, and even change things that don't need to. Case in point . . . the dipstick. I worked with engineers, and believe me, some can be a real pain in the behind. They tweek and fuss with the most minute things.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Keep checking frequently, the oil will get darker rather quickly, making the oil level easier to see on the dipstick.

A light tap or two with a hammer converts the dipstick to old school.
View attachment 138069
Excellent! Look how much easier it is to see the level. I'm getting a replacement dipstick and knock that silly plastic end off. Put the original back in when going to the dealer for service.
 

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I'm sure one will get used to it. My first impression was, "what a stupid looking dipstick." I've checked it again and it is still hard to read. Perhaps a flashlight on it might help. With all the cars I have owned, I've had no issue with reading the dipstick until now. Why can't they keep them the same. If something works, why the need to fix it. Bloody engineers have to tinker with everything for tinkering sake. They just can't leave things along. I know, I worked with engineers, and they can be a bloody pain in the a$$ at times.
For me the only challenge is you need a clean dipstick to reinsert to check level. The orange plastic is harder to clean dry of oil than an old style metal only stick. All I did is switch to a microfiber towel... which does the trick.

Once the stick is clean, insert, remove, and check oil level and in any normal light, even with fresh oil, you can see where the orange is wet and where it is not.

As for designers constantly tinkering with or changing designs, that is common across the industry. I believe the reason Honda has moved to this style stick in their new generation vehicles is because they are using very low viscosity oils now days, and a plain metal dipstick is not as effective at holding oil as those with additional attachments. The design is common world wide right now for Honda, and Honda DOES use even lower viscosity oil in some markets, such as Japan. Other than the stick being unfamiliar to owners historically, it does actually do a better job of holding the thin oil in place on the stick. Enough so to warrant a design change... not in my view.. but I'm not Honda. Heh... you could do worse of course..... look at this BMW stick (before BMW removed sticks completely, and changed to an electronic sensor and readout) o_O

 

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Thank goodness for engineers.....that 1979 Honda Civic CVCC was a Flintstones vehicle 40 years ago compared to our '17 CRV. I'm presuming that's due largely to engineers.

Here's what I find on both our RAV4 and CRV regarding checking the oil level. There is a certain amount of oil surface tension between the side of the dipstick tube and the dipstick itself. Pull the dipstick, wipe it off AND leave it out for say a minute or so. Check the brake fluid level the washer fluid whatever for a minute or so. During that minute or so more oil in the tube will drain down, leaving less on the sides of the dipstick, making it easier to see the oil level on the dipstick.
 

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Thank goodness for engineers.....that 1979 Honda Civic CVCC was a Flintstones vehicle 40 years ago compared to our '17 CRV. I'm presuming that's due largely to engineers.
heh.. yeah.... 40 years has moved design, features, and capabilities orders of magnitude forward in terms of Civic design. (y) (y)

1979 Civic (Japan market version too, with extra features):


2020 Civic:


Order of magnitude difference in price too.. but that is true for even things like a carton of milk too. :p

Personally, I will take the 2020 over the 1979.. any day. :)
 

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I loved our little '79 dark metallic green 3 door Civic hatch back. Our oldest son arrived in '80, the second in '83 so we traded the Civic in for a Dodge 3/4 ton conversion window van. At that time, a conversion van was the only way to family travel, when you couldn't fly.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
For me the only challenge is you need a clean dipstick to reinsert to check level. The orange plastic is harder to clean dry of oil than an old style metal only stick. All I did is switch to a microfiber towel... which does the trick.

Once the stick is clean, insert, remove, and check oil level and in any normal light, even with fresh oil, you can see where the orange is wet and where it is not.

As for designers constantly tinkering with or changing designs, that is common across the industry. I believe the reason Honda has moved to this style stick in their new generation vehicles is because they are using very low viscosity oils now days, and a plain metal dipstick is not as effective at holding oil as those with additional attachments. The design is common world wide right now for Honda, and Honda DOES use even lower viscosity oil in some markets, such as Japan. Other than the stick being unfamiliar to owners historically, it does actually do a better job of holding the thin oil in place on the stick. Enough so to warrant a design change... not in my view.. but I'm not Honda. Heh... you could do worse of course..... look at this BMW stick (before BMW removed sticks completely, and changed to an electronic sensor and readout) o_O

Now that's what I call a dipstick. At least one doesn't have to remove it to see where your oil level is.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank goodness for engineers.....that 1979 Honda Civic CVCC was a Flintstones vehicle 40 years ago compared to our '17 CRV. I'm presuming that's due largely to engineers.

Here's what I find on both our RAV4 and CRV regarding checking the oil level. There is a certain amount of oil surface tension between the side of the dipstick tube and the dipstick itself. Pull the dipstick, wipe it off AND leave it out for say a minute or so. Check the brake fluid level the washer fluid whatever for a minute or so. During that minute or so more oil in the tube will drain down, leaving less on the sides of the dipstick, making it easier to see the oil level on the dipstick.
I will try that. Thanks.
 
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