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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2006 CR-V 2WD Japan built. The brake warning light is now illuminated. I'm pretty sure it's because I did a no-no when trying to diagnose a scraping sound at the front passenger side which is where the impact was when my daughter wrecked her CR-V with no collision insurance. I'm fixing it for her. I eventually figured out it was the wheel bearing making the noise, and I did replace that, but before that in my inventive attempts to figure out what was making the noise by process of elimination, I believe I messed something up causing the brake warning light to illuminate.

I wanted to eliminate the possibility that the brakes were somehow making the noise, so I jacked up the front end of the car so the wheels were off the pavement and I removed the brake caliper, bracket, and rotor. I wanted to hear if the scraping sound would go away (or not) with the brake parts removed, and with the motor running and the wheels turning, but the car won't allow the transmission to be put in gear without first stepping on the brake. So, I knew if I stepped on the brake that the brake piston would spit right out of its bore, so I put a brake piston compressor in there to hold the piston in place. I should have known that the massive pressure from stepping on the brakes would not be stopped by the compressor. The piston didn't come out, but the compressor was bent a bit, so I put some used brake pads in there and filled up the space to try again. This time when stepping on the brake just long enough to get the car in gear, there was a loud rattling sound from......somewhere under the hood. I turned the car off and knew that wasn't going to work. I then decided to remove the CV axle from where it enters the hub splines. Then upon turning the hub, I could hear the bearing was making the noise. Great, I can replace that.

To get everything back together, I straightened my brake piston compressor and only had to compress the piston back into the bore a tiny bit to allow the pads to fit around the rotor. It was a fraction of an inch, so I was mostly successful in stopping the piston from coming out of the bore. The car runs fine and brakes fine, but the brake light is now illuminated (reservoir is full). Obviously I did something causing the light to illuminate. I know when compressing the piston back into the bore that you're supposed to open the bleeder valve so the pressure doesn't go to the ABS module, but since it only needed to be compressed a tiny bit, I just did it without opening the bleeder valve. BTW, the air bag light was already illuminated obviously since the passenger curtain and seat air bags were deployed in the accident. I'm fixing that later. The VSA light was also already illuminated before this, as well as the ABS light and the triangle with exclamation point light. The only thing new is now the brake light is on after doing what I did.

AND, my scanner won't communicate with the ABS module. The scanner communicates with everything else, though. Not sure if that was the case before I did this intelligent little trick.

OK......what do I check?
 

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The ABS fault you will need the fault code to help.

Regarding the brake light warning light on permanent, I would check your foot and parking brake switch and re-check the low fluid switch by jumping the two wires.

Note: I have seen reports of the little plastic cap coming off the foot pedal switch. Not sure if it's glued onto the pedal arm, or the switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The ABS fault you will need the fault code to help.
Right, but my scanner won't communicate with the ABS module. I checked both of the ABS fuses at the fuse box behind the battery and they both have continuity.

Regarding the brake light warning light on permanent, I would check your foot and parking brake switch and re-check the low fluid switch by jumping the two wires.

Note: I have seen reports of the little plastic cap coming off the foot pedal switch. Not sure if it's glued onto the pedal arm, or the switch.
OK, I will look for the plastic cap. For the fluid level switch, am I checking for continuity? If it does have continuity does that mean it's bad or good? Or, am I checking for Ohms of resistance?

I also checked the screen filter at the master cylinder reservoir. It's not plugged up at all. The fluid is dark, though I don't think that's the reason for the warning light. The warning light wasn't illuminated before I did this experiment, so obviously I've done something to the system.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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Seems as if you opened one of these.

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First off, you really need a scan tool that will read the ABS codes. Failing that, there are a few things you could check that MIGHT be causing the ABS malfunction.

1. Brake fluid light switch. You can disconnect it, then measure ohms across the terminals. Should change state when placed fully into the brake fluid reservoir. They have been known to stick if brake fluid hasn't been changed periodically.

2. Damaged or corroded wheel sensor wiring (or the sensor itself) as a result of the accident. When you replaced the wheel bearing, were you able to withdraw it successfully?

3. Wrong wheel bearing orientation. The wheel sensor 'reads' the bearing as it rotates, and Honda sensors are finicky about which way the new bearing was installed. (Do a SEARCH for details) Some aftermarket bearings are difficult for the sensor to read.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Seems as if you opened one of these.
Yep

First off, you really need a scan tool that will read the ABS codes. Failing that, there are a few things you could check that MIGHT be causing the ABS malfunction.
My scan tool does read ABS codes, but in this case it is not communicating with the ABS system, so there's something causing a block in communication between the scanner and the ABS module.

1. Brake fluid light switch. You can disconnect it, then measure ohms across the terminals. Should change state when placed fully into the brake fluid reservoir. They have been known to stick if brake fluid hasn't been changed periodically.
The brake fluid is dark, but the light wasn't illuminated before I did this job, so it's something that I did. I will check the level switch as you described.

2. Damaged or corroded wheel sensor wiring (or the sensor itself) as a result of the accident. When you replaced the wheel bearing, were you able to withdraw it successfully?
The wire and sensor itself look fine and not corroded. Yes, I was easily able to remove the sensor from the knuckle. We don't have rust problems here. I do know that just because a wire looks OK, doesn't mean it is OK. Not sure how to test that sensor. It would help if my ABS module was communicating with the scan tool.

3. Wrong wheel bearing orientation. The wheel sensor 'reads' the bearing as it rotates, and Honda sensors are finicky about which way the new bearing was installed. (Do a SEARCH for details) Some aftermarket bearings are difficult for the sensor to read.
What's interesting is that whoever last replaced the wheel bearing had the bearing in backwards in that the magnetic side was facing outwards. When I put the new bearing in, I made sure to install it with the magnetic side inwards. Is that the orientation you mean?

Yes, it was an aftermarket bearing: Duralast/AutoZone because I didn't want to wait for the extended shipping time that is going on now to get parts because of the virus. Otherwise I would have purchased an NSK, SKF, or Timken bearing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Brake fluid light switch. You can disconnect it, then measure ohms across the terminals. Should change state when placed fully into the brake fluid reservoir. They have been known to stick if brake fluid hasn't been changed periodically.
...re-check the low fluid switch by jumping the two wires.
I disconnected the fluid level sensor harness from the brake fluid reservoir. With the fluid at the full max line, I do not get continuity between the two prongs on the sensor. I then removed enough fluid to have the level below the minimum level line and I got good beeping continuity on my DVOM device. This tells me the sensor is working correctly and is not the reason for the brake light being illuminated while the hand brake is not engaged.

What can I check next?
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Easiest would be to try suggestion #2 before investigating #3.

Even though I do most of my own repairs, I farm out wheel bearings to a local Honda specialist shop. We see a LOT of road salt and corrosion here...
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I just checked the parking/emergency brake lever switch under the dash. It does not have continuity when it's not engaged. It does have continuity when it is engaged, so that tells me it is working. When engaged, the DVOMultimeter beeps and it shows 13 Ohms, which sometimes fluctuates between 9 Ohms and 15O Ohms. Not sure if with continuity it is supposed to be closer to zero Ohms or not. I'm assuming though, that because there is no continuity at all when the parking brake lever is disengaged, that the switch could not possibly be causing the brake warning light to illuminate. Sound right?

Easiest would be to try suggestion #2 before investigating #3.

Even though I do most of my own repairs, I farm out wheel bearings to a local Honda specialist shop. We see a LOT of road salt and corrosion here...
Thanks for responding. Sorry, but between your responses and Kev's responses, I'm not sure which suggestion is #2 and #3, but I think you mean suggestion #2 (wheel sensor and wiring) and #3 wheel bearing?

For #3 my wheel bearing installation should be correct, with the magnetic side oriented inwards, non-magnetic side oriented outwards. The install went easily and the noise the old wheel bearing was making went away. Yeah, it's an AutoZone bearing I put in, but I don't have any reason to think it's not working. Salt and corrosion are not an issue in my area.

For reason #2........I will double-check the wiring again for damage, but I don't think the wheel sensor & wire causes the brake warning light to illuminate, does it? It would cause the ABS warning light to illuminate. Yes, the ABS warning light has been illuminatedthe whole time, but the brake warning light wasn't illuminated until I ran the car with the wheels turning (car jacked up) and with the brake components not installed (and yeah, w/ replacing the bearing). I think this caused the problem, but not sure.

I think that weel speed sensors can be checked for Ohms, so I'll see if I can find the spec for that, unless anyone happens to have it?

Again, my scanner does have ABS scanning capability, but shows that there is no communication between it and the ABS module. I'm trying to find out which terminals on the ABS module connector to test for power/ground, etc. Anybody know?

Regarding the brake light warning light on permanent, I would check your foot and parking brake switch and re-check the low fluid switch by jumping the two wires.

Note: I have seen reports of the little plastic cap coming off the foot pedal switch. Not sure if it's glued onto the pedal arm, or the switch.
The low-fluid level switch is working perfectly and the foot pedal switch does indeed have the plastic cap. I don't think that switch illuminates the warning light, though. I'm under the impression that it will constantly illuminate the actual brake lights at the rear of the car if the cap is missing or if the switch is bad. See above in this post for my parking brake switch test.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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I'm not sure which suggestion is #2 and #3, but I think you mean suggestion #2 (wheel sensor and wiring) and #3 wheel bearing?
I was referring to my response in Post 4.

And yes, most of my concern was with the ABS system...

Not knowing the extent of the accident, it is difficult to guess why the BRAKE warning lamp itself would stay on. You would really need a schematic to troubleshoot that. (I have the basic genuine Honda manual but it doesn't have the wiring diagrams)
 

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Everything in Moderation
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Looking at the service manual, both the parking brake and brake fluid switches connect to the car through the MultiPlex Control Unit. o_O I didn't look up where in the car that is located. But there are several fuses in the circuit, as well as a couple of diodes.Ground is via G301

Rolling the car with the suspension at 'full droop' could have shorted a wire..perhaps, subtly where two wires are held together? And that could have damaged the multiplex control unit inj the under dash fuse/relay box?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I was referring to my response in Post 4.
OK good, that's what I assumed.

And yes, most of my concern was with the ABS system...
Right, it's just that the brake light wasn't illuminated until just after I did this brilliant job that I did. The ABS light had been illuminated since the accident, so it made me think they were separate issues because of those two reasons.

Not knowing the extent of the accident, it is difficult to guess why the BRAKE warning lamp itself would stay on. You would really need a schematic to troubleshoot that. (I have the basic genuine Honda manual but it doesn't have the wiring diagrams)
The accident damaged the passenger fender, wheel, bumper, bulkhead frame bracket, and wheelhouse frame bracket. I'm going to be replacing the fender and bumper along with the other two brackets mentioned that are spotwelded to the frame (I already removed from a donor car at the junkyard, but have to get them spotwelded back in place). The accident also damaged the strut, steering knuckle bearing housing, bearing, and headlamp. All replaced. Out of precaution, I replaced the control arm and stabilzer bar end link. The car drives just fine after replacing these items. These photos are before the parts have been replaced. If you look closely at the second photo, you can see the wheel rim was bent:

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Looking at the service manual, both the parking brake and brake fluid switches connect to the car through the MultiPlex Control Unit. o_O I didn't look up where in the car that is located. But there are several fuses in the circuit, as well as a couple of diodes.Ground is via G301
Yes, the mulitplex control unit is supposed to be next on the diagnostic step, so what you're saying makes sense. I'll have to look for it and those fuses you mentioned. I don't know what G301 is, though. I'll see if I can find out.

Rolling the car with the suspension at 'full droop' could have shorted a wire..perhaps, subtly where two wires are held together? And that could have damaged the multiplex control unit inj the under dash fuse/relay box?
Good way to describe what I was doing, thanks. I didn't think about that pulling on any wire when I did it. I'll take a closer look in there, but the only wire I know of is the wheel speed sensor.
 
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