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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do I need to cover up (plastic bags/saran wrap/aluminum foil) under a 2004 CR-V hood before detailing the engine---using a degreaser or all-purpose cleaner before spraying it down?

Others have mentioned covering the alternator, any exposed filters, and the engine's air intakes, but I can only identify the alternator (red box below). Where and what are the other parts that I should wrap up before hosing it down?
Land vehicle Vehicle Engine Car Auto part


Thanks for any help!
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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(Topic moved to MAINTENANCE & SERVICE...)




First off, CONGRATS on maintaining a clean engine bay! If the pic is what yours currently looks like, I'd say SKIP the spray degreaser, just wipe everything down with Dawn or other soapy solution; then rinse with a plain water spray bottle, and dry.

I'd cover (or be careful of) the ABS pump on the LH side, and the battery and black plastic fuse box to the right. Also be wary of the spark plug coils under the black cover, middle of the engine's valve cover. You don't want to force moisture into that high-voltage, poorly ventilated area.

DON'T use a power washer. DO use a tire dressing on the hoses...
 

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If it is a stock motor with no additions or modifications, just used simple green diluted 1 to 1 with water. Spray it on the cold motor, let it sit then gently hose off with a garden hose. Not a power washer or the car wash. I don't cover anything when I hose down my engine bay and have never had a problem. I have some pictures that I can post if you're interested.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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^^^ Cold engine, DIY Guy? Conventional wisdom is that a warm engine bay (not HOT) will reduce moisture from seeping into many components.


That's what I've always done anyway.

The last engine I needed to actually spray down was my brother's car when he put it up for sale, now THAT had 15 years of gunk on it! (Where's the YUKKKK smiley???)
 

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I have always done similar to what DYI Guy said. Sometimes cold, sometimes moderate warmed motor. Use common sense.

Ever open your hood after driving in heavy rain? Did you cover anything? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'd cover (or be careful of) the ABS pump on the LH side, and the battery and black plastic fuse box to the right. Also be wary of the spark plug coils under the black cover, middle of the engine's valve cover. You don't want to force moisture into that high-voltage, poorly ventilated area.

DON'T use a power washer. DO use a tire dressing on the hoses...
I will look out for these areas, thanks.

If it is a stock motor with no additions or modifications, just used simple green diluted 1 to 1 with water. Spray it on the cold motor, let it sit then gently hose off with a garden hose. Not a power washer or the car wash. I don't cover anything when I hose down my engine bay and have never had a problem. I have some pictures that I can post if you're interested.
I happen to have some 1:1 simple green lying around. This sounds like something I might try.

Just to Clarify, that red box you have around the part is NOT the Alternator, that is the Power Steering Pump.
Thanks. As someone new to cars in general, I'd love to know the name of each of the parts in the engine bay. Unfortunately, there isn't a comprehensive diagram in the Owner's Manual. Is there something else I can reference?
 

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Everything in Moderation
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I happen to have some 1:1 simple green lying around. This sounds like something I might try.
Dawn dishwasher detergent works better in my experience. (I was tipped off to this, by a transmission shop that used it to clean parts.) Dawn cuts petroleum (which is why they use it to wash wildlife after oil spills).
I'd love to know the name of each of the parts in the engine bay. Unfortunately, there isn't a comprehensive diagram in the Owner's Manual. Is there something else I can reference?
Sometimes the maintenance section of the owners manual tells where the components are (at least, the stuff you are allowed to touch).

It can help to look on online parts dealer's websites for exploded view diagrams.

hondapartsdeals.com is one.

http://www.hondapartsdeals.com/honda_parts.php
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dawn dishwasher detergent works better in my experience. . . . Sometimes the maintenance section of the owners manual tells where the components are (at least, the stuff you are allowed to touch).
(After quick Google search...)

Wow, I didn't know that Dawn had such legendary capabilities. Going to check if I have some lying around.

Will work on identifying major parts in my engine bay...
 

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^^^ Cold engine, DIY Guy? Conventional wisdom is that a warm engine bay (not HOT) will reduce moisture from seeping into many components.


That's what I've always done anyway.

The last engine I needed to actually spray down was my brother's car when he put it up for sale, now THAT had 15 years of gunk on it! (Where's the YUKKKK smiley???)
Seeping into what? I have never had an issue. You might have a warm motor to spray, it doesn't mean the surrounding components are going to be warm. If your worried about it, you're better off starting the motor after spraying it off. I never do. If I need to dry it quickly, I have a Master Blaster.

Regular liquid Tide will work too. I just use Simple Green. Easier to mix and put in a spray bottle than trying to put soap in a bottle and diluting with water to be able to use is a spray bottle. I will put the water in first, then Simple Green.

I myself use In and Out Detail Spray. I buy it by the case.

Land vehicle Vehicle Car Engine Auto part


Vehicle Car Auto part Engine Compact car


Land vehicle Vehicle Car Auto part Engine
 

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Everything in Moderation
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DIY Guy,
Nice results!



Seeping into what? I have never had an issue.
In today's engines with coil-over plugs, I would be worried about water getting under the ignition wiring cover (the black one on the valve cover, on the first pic). That cover has no gasket or seal.

We have seen corrosion on the spark plugs underneath those covers. On some cars (not Hondas) I have seen plugs all rusty and arcing in there, blecch.

You may not have an issue immediately, it may take months for Creeping Corrosion to cause an issue. Witness the large number of 'No Start' complaints this time of year!


Other high voltage, high amperage circuits can corrode too (which is why I suggested protecting that fusebox on the drivers' side). In Chrysler minivans, the connectors under a similar fusebox component corrode and cause issues. (And, that's just from regular use, who said "Don't worry, your engine gets wet when you drive in the rain?" ) :eek:



I guess our beliefs are based on our personal experiences. :eek:



Take that Master Blaster blow-dryer as an example: Some folks in the Classic Car community won't use those, because of the possibility of driving water into poorly-ventilated areas of the car & causing rust. For the same reason, some folks won't even wash the outside of their classics with a garden hose...they just use a hand-spray and wipe dry, lightly....

Takes all kinds, right? ;)
 

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If you look at how those parts are put together, they are lapped if that makes sense. For lack of a better explanation they are put together to where liquid can't flow into it. Unless you're trying hard to get it in there. Think of how a downspout on a rain gutter is put together for example. Corrosion on the spark plugs can easily be caused by lack of maintenance and different metals reacting with each other over long periods of time.

As far as the classic cars and a master blaster, those cars don't get dirty enough to require anything more than a waterless wash wipe down. As far as driving water into places with the master blaster, the air is heated to 30 degrees over ambient air temperature, and is powerful enough that the water dries up. That is one of my detailing tools that I held off on buying because of the cost and wish I had bought it sooner. Somebody a few years back posted a video of it driving a full gallon jug off of a table.
 
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