Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,055 Posts
:Dunno: I would have to look in the owner's manual for that info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,055 Posts
Is that from the owner’s manual?.......:Darn:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
I use 80 pounds on any Honda or Acura, summer or winter wheels. In fact my Nissan XTrail called for that as well And used for the winter wheels too. I also use same tire pressures on winter tires as summer ones.
 

·
Registered
2019 CR-V Touring AWD
Joined
·
74 Posts
I'll drag out an old thread rather than starting one. The manual only states the wheel nut torque for the "spare", no spec for the alloy wheels. My 2019 CR-V presently has lug nuts at "at least" 120 ft-lb, and I stopped there. I expected 80ft-lb and was checking for uniformity, due to very early pulsations (8600 miles). I was only checking prior to going to Honda to ask about rotor warranty. Now I am not sure what I am going to do. The last rotation might have been done by someone who didn't know the spec. Comments?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
I'll drag out an old thread rather than starting one. The manual only states the wheel nut torque for the "spare", no spec for the alloy wheels. My 2019 CR-V presently has lug nuts at "at least" 120 ft-lb, and I stopped there. I expected 80ft-lb and was checking for uniformity, due to very early pulsations (8600 miles). I was only checking prior to going to Honda to ask about rotor warranty. Now I am not sure what I am going to do. The last rotation might have been done by someone who didn't know the spec. Comments?
Loosen the nuts and retorque them yourself.

The manual does say 80ft-lb for all the tires.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
·
9,166 Posts
I'll drag out an old thread rather than starting one. The manual only states the wheel nut torque for the "spare", no spec for the alloy wheels. My 2019 CR-V presently has lug nuts at "at least" 120 ft-lb, and I stopped there. I expected 80ft-lb and was checking for uniformity, due to very early pulsations (8600 miles). I was only checking prior to going to Honda to ask about rotor warranty. Now I am not sure what I am going to do. The last rotation might have been done by someone who didn't know the spec. Comments?
Maybe check your owners manual again... carefully. :)

For the record.. the correct answer is 80 ft-lb. Probably more important that they all be at the same torque more so than the actual torque value... as long as you get it to 80 so you don't have a wheel working it's way loose on the lugs over time.

Personally, I always check and retorque to 80 ft-lbs a week after any service that involved removing the wheels. Better safe than sorry.
 

·
Registered
2019 CR-V Touring AWD
Joined
·
74 Posts
Maybe check your owners manual again... carefully. :)

For the record.. the correct answer is 80 ft-lb. Probably more important that they all be at the same torque more so than the actual torque value... as long as you get it to 80 so you don't have a wheel working it's way loose on the lugs over time.

Personally, I always check and retorque to 80 ft-lbs a week after any service that involved removing the wheels. Better safe than sorry.
Yeah, the reason I asked in the first place is that the latest manual only addressed torque fir the steel spar, not the alloy wheels. So, …, talked to the guy that does our mandatory PA state inspections and let him know that my wrench shows 125 ft-lb. I have an an appointment in the morning for him to see why the torque is so high. I’ll have a Bloody Mary first. Cheers
 

·
Super Moderator - How may I help?
Joined
·
5,674 Posts
When in school I thought I was taught it (torque) was "ft-lbs" Now I see it mostly mentioned as "lb-ft"..except in this thread. :unsure:

OK, I looked it up. LOL

The “pound-foot” (lb-ft) is a unit of torque and a vector measurement that is created by one pound of force acting on a one foot lever. The formula for torque in the instance of tightening a fastener would be: Torque equals force times radius, or T=FR. When tightening a bolt, “R” would be the length of your wrench.

The “foot-pound” (or more accurately, “foot-pound-force”), on the other hand, is a measurement of work. Work is the measurement of force over a given distance. So one foot-pound-force (ft-lbf or just ft-lb) is the energy required to move a one pound object one foot of linear distance.
 

·
Premium Member
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
·
9,166 Posts
When in school I thought I was taught it (torque) was "ft-lbs" Now I see it mostly mentioned as "lb-ft"..except in this thread. :unsure:

OK, I looked it up. LOL

The “pound-foot” (lb-ft) is a unit of torque and a vector measurement that is created by one pound of force acting on a one foot lever. The formula for torque in the instance of tightening a fastener would be: Torque equals force times radius, or T=FR. When tightening a bolt, “R” would be the length of your wrench.

The “foot-pound” (or more accurately, “foot-pound-force”), on the other hand, is a measurement of work. Work is the measurement of force over a given distance. So one foot-pound-force (ft-lbf or just ft-lb) is the energy required to move a one pound object one foot of linear distance.
There are two steps here. 1) how to create an objective unit of measure. 2) how to apply a unit of measure to work performed. The first is very clinical and objective in establishing a unit of measure. The second generally results in such units of measure to be used in novel ways beyond why they were created.

I guess lb-ft and ft-lb are essentially interchangeable in application as a metric. Both correct, for the purposes of the pragmatics of tight lug nuts, but on a class test.. gotta go with what the professor declares. :p My torque wrench has triple metrics ft-lbs, newton meters, and inch-lbs on it's dial to set the torque limit.

So applying a torque wrench to a lug nut is indeed applying "measurement of work" as the meter on the wrench tells you how much force you have applied to a lug as it tightens to the wheel. So, ft-lb would be correct in my view and most logical for the task of using a torque wrench.

Or we could shift to newton meters which is an actual measurement of torque force, and follows the same convention as lb-ft (force on a lever for a specified distance)

My wife would tell you that she simply sets the wrench to 80, tightens the bolt until the "thingy" which is set to 80 clicks, and completely bypasses all the ambiguity of technical terms. :ROFLMAO: Yes... she carries a breaker bar and a torque wrench in her trunk kit and knows how to use them.. though she always seems to have someone close at hand ready and willing to change a tire for her (most often ME). :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Is the torque the same for aluminum and steel winter wheels? 80 lbs
Usually, torque values are based on the size of the stud not on wheel composition.

Too much torque can warp brake rotors so it's a good idea to check it if some kid at a low buck place "torqued" your wheels.

Look up the correct values in your Owner's Manual - The online downloads can be searched pretty easily.

Some day, we may be able to use N-m like every other country in the world...

Usually, torque values are based on the size of the stud not on wheel composition.

Too much torque can warp brake rotors so it's a good idea to check it if some kid at a low buck place "torqued" your wheels.

Look up the correct values in your Owner's Manual - The online downloads can be searched pretty easily.

Torque in a cross-wise fashion, not by doing the fastener next to the one you just did. It is good practice to torque in steps, say 50 then 65, then 80 but I often skip that and use 2 steps.

Some day, we may be able to use N-m like every other country in the world...
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top