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No...Depending on how it looks, you can leave it alone and do nothing.

But, I'd pull the flywheel and take it to a machine shop and have it surfaced. They will cut it flat. I thinkit is about $25 or so for that.

When you do that, look at your rear main seal. Some people will automatically change it. If it was me...(if you was me, you'd jump off a tall building), I'd see if it had any signs of leaking...if there are none, and you are below 200K, I wouldn't mess w/it. The reason is, you can possibly scratch the crank changing the seal....not good.
 

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The reason is, you can possibly scratch the crank changing the seal....not good.
Not a problem! ? That is why they make a Ready-Sleeve or Speedi-Sleeve, which is a very thin, highly accurate machined sleeve you press onto a shaft to repair the sealing surface. Chicago Rawhide (or whoever owns them now), National (Federal Mogul), etc. make them. Perhaps even Timken. All you need is the shaft diameter and you're good to go.

They were made just for this purpose--it's cheaper to buy a sleeve than it is to replace a shaft. When I worked in the industry, we used to sell the sleeves for a lot of money using that reasoning (although I didn't completely agree with it).
 

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I'm in need of changing my clutch for my car and was wandering when changing the clutch do I need to change the flywheel in this model as well or not?
Agree with Stinky's response.
I'm in need of changing my clutch for my car and was wandering when changing the clutch do I need to change the flywheel in this model as well or not?
 

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You should be able to run your finger across the flywheel's clutch surface and tell if it is grooved or damaged. Also inspect visually with a bright light. If it is still smooth, then no, you should be okay. If not, it should be fairly obvious. If the old clutch disc was run down to a wear point that allowed metal-to-metal contact, then it will need resurfacing, or, if very deeply grooved, may need replacement. Also inspect the clutch disc. If it has shiny spots where rivets have been touching the flywheel, or the pressure plate (on the other side) then you will need to spend the money. A new clutch disc really needs smooth surfaces. Grooved ones will just eat it up much more quickly, kind of like how brake pads can eat rotors when left far too long, and then the grooved rotors will eat new pads quickly.
 
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