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Just a thought that came across my mind. For people who are favoring the hybrid or planning to buy a hybrid and can wait, why would you settle for such a setup when a true alternative solution is rapidly becoming mainstream, EV? Why not wait around a bit longer and get an extended range EV when rapid charging infrastructure is set up around the country? I understand the MPG and stuff but you are still anchored to the same internal combustion engine? Also not to mention the fact that the engine might not be used at all for some of you for an extended period of time, which might not be good for the engine in regard to old oil and stale ethanol gas. In the past when the only true EV solution was the one from GM, I could see hybrid was the better alternative but not today when Tesla/Volkwagen/Ford etc. are getting into the game big time.
 

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How rapidly are they building charging stations in your area of the country?

I seem to remember a few charging stations at the Cracker Barrel restaurants in Tennessee, but I didn't notice any a couple of days ago when I visited a Cracker Barrel here in Nevada while visiting family for turkey day.

There is a strip mall parking lot in Cookeville, TN where Tesla installed 5 or 6 "supercharging" stations, but they're only for Tesla's.
I've driven a couple of hybrid rental cars, and they do get impressive fuel mileage, but you still have to put gas in them to run the gasoline engine that recharges the batteries.

This is really a 'chicken and egg' problem, that no one wants to build charging stations because there aren't a lot of electric vehicles, and you can't sell a lot of electric vehicles unless there are enough charging stations where people live and drive. And how many miles can you drive on a single charge, and then we need to build charging stations at intervals much less than the "maximum" fully charged driving distance.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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There are websites out there that list all the chargers out there. The problem pure electric has is recharging time for those long road trips.

I could see many families ultimately with one electric plus one hybrid or gas powered vehicle for the longer rides.
 

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The EV manufactures need to do what VW did in the 1950's.

You went into a VW dealer and they dropped the whole engine with a different one that was ready for the road - tuned up and oil changed. It took a trained VM mechanic about 10 minutes to do the job. Issues with warranties and dumb american laws ended that practice as did the fact that VW started making slightly larger engines and everyone wanted a larger engine at oil change time.

the EV makers need a standard battery that can be removed and a fresh charged battery dropped in so that it takes no longer than a gas fill up to replace the low charge battery for a full charge battery. With proper tools to measure charge left and charge added so that payment for the charge is correct.

Until then EV have to be an around town vehicle as rapid charging seems to reduce battery life.

No electric or hybrid is a green vehicle - the pollution created making batteries is much more than that of gas cars provided the gas car makes it past 80,000 miles the break even point that matched a hybrid pollution should the hybrid get 120,000 miles out of the batteries. The sad part is many Civic Hybrids had battery failure in as little as 40,000 miles. Also many Hybrid owners fail to drive a hybrid to get the best out of them. you cannot creep forward in traffic as that restarts the motor in the IMA hybrid designs and you have to go fast enough after starting up to get the car to sop the engine. It does not work in heavy city traffic. (I know I owned 2 civic hybrids - that cured me of hybrids - the savings in gas mileage is never enough to cover the extra cost of hybrids and about when they break even you have to replace the batteries and in the case of the Honda Civic Hybrid - it was more than the 5 year old car was worth.)
 

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2020 CRV-EX Hybrid Sonic Grey Pearl
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When researching my purchase of a 2020 CR-V I was concerned about the oil dilution issues with the 1.5 Turbo. The fact that the hybrid is faster and has more torque and HP than the 1.5 was another bonus. I also read some reviews by Car and Driver and others that said buying the hybrid was a good deal considering they only come with AWD and the cost is not $1500 more than FWD on the 1.5.

Honda's hybrid battery warranty is good for 8 years or 100,000 miles. Remanufactured hybrid batteries cost from $1495 w/2-year warranty to $2195 w/ lifetime warranty. So I say that covers most bases as to why I bought the Hybrid!
 

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2020 CRV EXL 2WD
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I don't have either right now but if I were to buy, off the top of my head:

EV if I'm just driving around town - errands, short trips, short/medium commuting.

Hybrid if I'm going out of town (or driving around town all day) - vacations/travelling, road trips, medium/long travels especially without having to pre-plan/route/schedule everything...

Availability of charging locations + wait time for charging...
 

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2020 CR-V Touring Hybrid
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79 Posts
I bought the hybrid because reviews indicated it was a slightly more refined driving experience vs the standard engine, had a bit more HP & torque and because I didn’t really want a tiny turbo 4 cylinder. The fuel economy is a tertiary consideration for me, and at this point I think a full EV is impractical as real transportation, and a false economy in terms of overall “greenness”. All the Tesla appliance pilots can continue to thank us for subsidizing their indulgence.
 

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2020 CR-V Touring HyBrid All wheel drive, black/black.
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I have no interest in an EV, I like the combination of gas / electric propulsion and personally think it is a better alternative to all electric.

Great gas mileage, great driving range, much better than EV and not tied to a power cord. On a road trip I want to be able to cover 500/600 miles per day which is not possible for an EV.

I traded in a 2017 CR-V Touring and one of the reasons was to get away from the possibility of oil / gas dilution issues in the future.
 

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CRV-Hybrid EX (actually, my ex is a Prius)
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The question was asked two years ago in 2018. Now it's 2020 and we still have the same situation - if you want "experience" and the real-life TCO doesn't bother you, you can get an EV, but if you want an all-round automobile + the best value for money, you get a hybrid :)
 

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2020 CRV EXL 2WD
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I don't have either right now but if I were to buy, off the top of my head:

EV if I'm just driving around town - errands, short trips, short/medium commuting.

Hybrid if I'm going out of town (or driving around town all day) - vacations/travelling, road trips, medium/long travels especially without having to pre-plan/route/schedule everything...

Availability of charging locations + wait time for charging...
DOH, I'm a major bonehead - I/we DO have a hybrid, wife's leased Lexus ES300h... my CRS is worse than I thought... :(
 
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