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Discussion Starter #1
While we freely drive each other's vehicles, the CR-V is really "mine", a replacement for my beloved (but worn out) '04 1.8T M/T Passat Wagon.

Well, my wife's car (an '06 Solara Convertible that she will probably drive until the wheels fall off, due to the dearth of viable replacements), has to go to the shop, so she borrowed mine this morning.

She's the sort that views cars as nothing more than an appliance, and doesn't get enthusiastic about anything in particular (other than the fact her car is the platonic ideal of a "non-driver's" convertible.) She called me after getting to where she was going and said simply "Wow!" She'd driven it a couple of times, but hadn't had a chance to use the drive-assist features in rush-hour traffic yet. She was blown away by how much easier and less stressful it made the drive. I think we are both in agreement that traffic inexplicably slowing down and speeding up is a lot less stressful if you don't have to keep messing with the brake, the gas, and the cruise control system... you don't even notice you are going slower than planned unless you look down and see the car's adjusted the cruise speed.

I know that the drive-assist features in our cars aren't necessarily much different from the other cars on the market, but certainly she's impressed by them all the same. I know that if Toyota still sold the Solara, we'd probably be at the local dealership this very evening scoping out a new one...
 

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It's always a plus when your wife really likes your new vehicle too. My wife views cars as an appliance too - just something to get from point A to B. When we get one, hopefully she will be enthusiastic too.
 

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Yep, this is the only reason I bought the CRV, it came with sensing & blind spot monitoring standard. My wife is a spaz when driving and this CRV is made specifically for those type of drivers. Now all we need is for civics/civic hatches get standard bsm/sensing.
 

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It works differently at my house and we're at 49 years and counting. The new or newest car is hers but I have full access to it. I buy them based on her input but they are hers. I use the older car and maintain all of them.
 

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I got a 2017 Hyundai Tucson Limited (loaded) and the wife had the 2016 Mazda CX5 Touring.
We traded the Mazda for a 2017 CRV EX.

My wife prefers the Hyundai, it comes with all the safety features plus the huge sunroof and the leather.


Between the two, the CRV feels much bigger and heavier, the Tucson is smoother.
But a launch, the CRV feels quicker and get better fuel economy.

Overall I'm Okay with the CRV for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I got a 2017 Hyundai Tucson Limited (loaded) and the wife had the 2016 Mazda CX5 Touring.
We traded the Mazda for a 2017 CRV EX.

My wife prefers the Hyundai, it comes with all the safety features plus the huge sunroof and the leather.

Between the two, the CRV feels much bigger and heavier, the Tucson is smoother.
But a launch, the CRV feels quicker and get better fuel economy.

Overall I'm Okay with the CRV for now.
Just curious; was there something wrong with your CX-5? It certainly was a strong contender for my purchasing dollars; really if the existing model had Android Auto/CarPlay when I was originally shopping six or so months ago, I probably would have one in my driveway right now. (It'll probably make the '18 model, slated for some time this summer...)
 

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I got a 2017 Hyundai Tucson Limited (loaded) and the wife had the 2016 Mazda CX5 Touring.
We traded the Mazda for a 2017 CRV EX.

My wife prefers the Hyundai, it comes with all the safety features plus the huge sunroof and the leather.


Between the two, the CRV feels much bigger and heavier, the Tucson is smoother.
But a launch, the CRV feels quicker and get better fuel economy.

Overall I'm Okay with the CRV for now.
I own a Hyundai (Azera) as well as a CRV and the silky feeling Hyundai has is well ahead of Honda. They have come a long way. I looked at the Tucson but was scared away by the early issues they were having with the new transmission.
 

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This is a question for sirwired,
As a 40 plus year VW owner who currently drives a 2003 Passat 1.8T GLS Variant, I’m pretty sure that I remember your name from vwvortex and/or passatworld.
We are thinking of replacing our 14 year old 125,00 mile Passat wagon with a 2017 CRV.
Since it appears that you have done the same thing, what are likes and dislikes relative to the Passat Wagon?
Things like the ability to carry 5 tall people in relative comfort. Useful luggage capacity. Visibility. NVH. Ride.
Thanks,
Bob
 

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Just curious; was there something wrong with your CX-5? It certainly was a strong contender for my purchasing dollars; really if the existing model had Android Auto/CarPlay when I was originally shopping six or so months ago, I probably would have one in my driveway right now. (It'll probably make the '18 model, slated for some time this summer...)
We put lots of mileage, and since the next model is around the corner, we figured that if we have waited, I would have to take a bigger hit in depreciation.
I had the Touring model equal to the CRV EX I bought.
Mechanically it wasn't too bad, just annoyance with few things like road noise (we even swapped the tires) but I think the problem was poor insulation.
The info system (radio) was awful (freezes all the time) you cannot shut the radio off, only muted. You had to go thru so many task just to switch from radio to other sources.
Oil changes needed to be done every 4K or 4 months (per Mazda, yes per Mazda due to the hot climate in Florida they claimed).
Rear camera was bad too, specially at night.
I paid extra for a awful Bose system and the GPS was not the greatest.
No heated seats.
No XM but I had HD radio.
The MPG are much better on the CRV, radio, insulation, the cloth material and I think that the turbo engine is at equal quality as the non turbo 2.5 litter engine from the Mazda.
I got some really bad experience from different stealerships in my area so I just made the decision of no more Mazdas for a long time.

Frankly, I like the CRV overall over the Mazda CX5. Plus better resale value.


I own a Hyundai (Azera) as well as a CRV and the silky feeling Hyundai has is well ahead of Honda. They have come a long way. I looked at the Tucson but was scared away by the early issues they were having with the new transmission.
I think that the Hyundai Tucson is a better built than the CRV, MINUS three things, the resale value, the dual clutch transmission problem and the remote start needs to be initiate by using a phone (you have to pay for the yearly subscription).

The Tucson feels lighter, better handling, more fun to drive, and the front(hood) is not like the CRV (huge hood).
My wife didn't like the huge hood on the CRV and she felt like she was driving a boat (her description not mine). But she digs the Tucson.

Keep in mind I have the Tucson Limited edition equal to the CRV Touring model. But I feel that the Hyunda Tucson is a better deal than the Touring. Plus you get a better warranty.

If I have to choose between the CRV Touring and the Tucson Limited with the ultimate package, I would take the Tucson any giving day.
I love the fact that I have the two best Crossover in that price range.

I drove the Rav4, but the road noise was bad and no blind spot monitor in the XLE (equal model to the CRV EX) poor handling, and the 2017 is the outgoing model as well.

My two cents.
 

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Hey, I drove a Passat Wagon in the past so I think I can give you some feed back.
IMO, the CRV is a much better vehicle, lots of room in the second row in comparison to the wagon.
Better visibility and better cargo space. It might be an equal fuel consumption (I had the 2.5 liter gas engine)

The wagon have a better handling because is lower to the ground.
Too many electrical problems with the VWs.

The Wagon had a better sound system and it was lighter.
AND better resale value on the CRV too.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
This is a question for sirwired,
As a 40 plus year VW owner who currently drives a 2003 Passat 1.8T GLS Variant, I’m pretty sure that I remember your name from vwvortex and/or passatworld.
We are thinking of replacing our 14 year old 125,00 mile Passat wagon with a 2017 CRV.
Since it appears that you have done the same thing, what are likes and dislikes relative to the Passat Wagon?
Things like the ability to carry 5 tall people in relative comfort. Useful luggage capacity. Visibility. NVH. Ride.
Thanks,
Bob
It's nice to be recognized! Yes, I'm the same SirWired with over 5k posts on PassatWorld.

Really, the age of the wagon is over. I looked at the SportWagen, but VW's current difficulties in the US, combined with VW shifting the safety gadget package in '17 to "factory order only" (translation: "Available only in theory") took it out of the running. (I'd have a '16 with the safety package in my driveway now if not for an idiot dealer in NJ who couldn't understand the concept of negotiation a purchase over e-mail.)

Pluses:
- My 165k '04 wagon had devloped all manner of rattles and they were driving me nuts. Sagging door cards, and the one-thing-after-another need for repairs was getting aggrevating. Coil packs one month, split vac lines the next, the need to spend some quality time with the suspension, all the "soft touch" surfaces in the cabin being destroyed, etc. In the home of an enthusiast, I'm sure Hans will serve well, but I just don't have the time or the inclination to fix all that.
- I went from a car built on a platform that is 20 years old to something more modern, and all that implies. Advances in transmissions mean I can accept a modern two-pedal car that has none of the drawbacks that led me to choose an M/T thirteen years ago.
- The tech. Oh, lord, the tech. Other than selecting a car with manual climate control, I got the advanced version, with the Stability Program package. (You would not BELIEVE how hard that made my search for a car... only $300, and it was near-impossible to find. Now that I think about it, similar to what VW is doing to the latest safety package now.) The "self-drive" features are a revelation. If you deal with traffic AT ALL, the adaptive cruise with low-speed follow is worth it's weight in gold. And Android Auto / CarPlay is wonderful (if for no other reason than you get free navi.)
- Reliability. No way to predict the future with 100% certainty, but it's not expected that I'll have to monitor forums like a hawk to know the ins-and-outs for keeping the car running a long time. I did a quite a bit of research and preventive maint. to keep the B5.5 going as long as I did. My wife's Solara? I log onto a forum maybe once a year; it doesn't need the "care and feeding" that the B5 did.
- Comfort. Besides the auto climate control, Honda's done a really good job with the seats. They are THAT good.

Cons:
- It's hard to describe, but you know that feeling you got when you first took a new B5.5 out for a test drive? That "thing" that seems to be unique to factory-fresh German cars? Yeah, the CR-V doesn't have it. It handles well enough, but not with that feeling of being "one with the machine". The same thing extends to the rest of the car; the buttons and controls (VW even explicitly states they have corporate standards for things like buttons, dials, switches, latches, etc., so they all feel the same), the ergonomics, etc. I definitely get the feeling in the CR-V that I'm in the car, not part of the car. I guess it's the difference between flying first class, and flying from the pilot's seat. There's pluses and minuses to each experience.

- Handling: The CR-V isn't sloppy or floaty, but it's no German Driving Machine. Really, it's very "Honda-like" in how it handles; seems very similar to how I remember my wife's long-ago '98 Accord. It's a deliberate decision they've made, and only you can decide if it'll work for you.

As far as practicality goes; other than the lack of factory roof rails (unless you get the touring), they are about the same. Both have cavernous cargo space. The CR-V has a much more expansive back seat. Both are reasonably thrifty with fuel, though the CR-V can swill regular.

Really, the B5.5 was ahead of it's time. Only with this latest generation of vehicles, over 15 years after the B5.5 wagon was released, are modern CUV's equalling those long-gone family haulers. Only now can you get something with approximate handling, cargo space, fuel efficiency, etc. (Which is a shame, really, I can only imagine what a modern station wagon would be like... no carmaker will bring them here. There are lots of wagons offered around the globe, and the US doesn't get them.)

On NVH: I'd say, net, they are about the same. The CR-V has less road noise, but during acceleration, is a little more "sharp" and "raspy". I don't know what VW did to the 1.8T to make it so muffled, but I've never seen it's equal. I don't think the CR-V is actually noisier, but the sounds "charachter" is different.

Hope this long bit of rambling helps...
 

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It's nice to be recognized! Yes, I'm the same SirWired with over 5k posts on PassatWorld.

Really, the age of the wagon is over. I looked at the SportWagen, but VW's current difficulties in the US, combined with VW shifting the safety gadget package in '17 to "factory order only" (translation: "Available only in theory") took it out of the running. (I'd have a '16 with the safety package in my driveway now if not for an idiot dealer in NJ who couldn't understand the concept of negotiation a purchase over e-mail.)

Cons:
- It's hard to describe, but you know that feeling you got when you first took a new B5.5 out for a test drive? That "thing" that seems to be unique to factory-fresh German cars? Yeah, the CR-V doesn't have it. It handles well enough, but not with that feeling of being "one with the machine". The same thing extends to the rest of the car; the buttons and controls (VW even explicitly states they have corporate standards for things like buttons, dials, switches, latches, etc., so they all feel the same), the ergonomics, etc. I definitely get the feeling in the CR-V that I'm in the car, not part of the car. I guess it's the difference between flying first class, and flying from the pilot's seat. There's pluses and minuses to each experience.

Really, the B5.5 was ahead of it's time. Only with this latest generation of vehicles, over 15 years after the B5.5 wagon was released, are modern CUV's equalling those long-gone family haulers. Only now can you get something with approximate handling, cargo space, fuel efficiency, etc. (Which is a shame, really, I can only imagine what a modern station wagon would be like... no carmaker will bring them here. There are lots of wagons offered around the globe, and the US doesn't get them.)

Hope this long bit of rambling helps...
Sirwired,

I think you nailed the reasons that we hung onto our Passat for such a long time. Mostly FEEL.

The VW with tech part is another problem. Last spring we test drove a Golf Sportwagen LE since it had the tech that we wanted. But it was too small inside regardless of what the raw numbers said. The rear seat room was totally unacceptable for 3 tall people, needed when family flies in. And the B pillar was blocking my view to the right plus it was just too low. What ever happened to VW color choices? Back in 2003 there were 3 blues, 2 greens and so on. My wife's is a Fresco Green with Summer Beige leather interior, really cheerful. We did have to search to get one with ESP.

We saw the 2017 CRV at the Philly car show this week and were impressed. It is really the first car to make us consider replacing our Passat. The interior is nice enough with lots of soft touch surfaces to pass for German. I'm a soft touch junky. My daily driver is an E46 convertible where every interior surface is soft touch. The CRV's seats seemed soft enough, the rear seats seemed wide enough and the cargo area seems plenty big. The only problem is a roof rack long enough to carry either of my 2 canoes. I'm not about to spend an extra $3K for roof rails.

Thanks for you comparative thoughts. And hopefully you will have no reason to have over 5,000 posts on this website.

Bob
 

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Bob, I'm another Passat convert - though from a '13 TDI SEL Sedan to the CR-V. I'll echo many of the comments. Having owned a bunch of BMWs, MB and then the Passat, it's amazing how each manufacturer has their own "feel". The BMW to me is the most nimble of the lot. Slightly heavier feel than the VW, but not all that dissimilar. I know the E46, as I had an 02 E46 based M3. Also had an M-Roadster, and a few other bimmers. The VW had a similar light but planted feel - though obviously not with nearly the suspension as the M's. Had an '00 MB CLK and then bought a new MB '08 E class - very different feel. Much heavier, more stable, but for a highway and family car I really really enjoyed them. Test drove Audi A6's, but felt the steering just didn't provide feedback.

The CR-V isn't a sports car. It's kind of "neutral". It's solid, predictable and planted. Honestly a lot less body roll than I expected. But not that much feedback either. For what it is, I think it's great. The Subaru Outback to me was a LOT more "clunky" in the front end.

I also looked at the Sportwagen. However, like you I felt that regardless of the numbers, it was way too small inside, WAY too expensive for what it offered, and honestly, VW really made me distrust their electronics after owning the Passat. The TDI was great to drive. The infotainment system was the worst I've ever seen in my life. Totally unreliable. That being said, the only reason I replaced it was because of the whole TDI thing. Couldn't afford not to. Yet, while I do miss the fuel economy of the Passat - that's about all I miss. Pretty much everything else about the CR-V seems to be an improvement - for me. Not the least of which, to be honest, is not having to get my 6'2" frame up and down getting in and out of it. For my performance cars, I'm totally cool with sitting on the road. But for a daily driver, I didn't realize how tedious it actually had become.
 

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Sirwired, in comparison to your '04 VW Wagon with 165,000 miles, my wife and I have an '04 CR-V EX AWD with 200,000 miles. Bought it new, and in the past 13 years, we've only had minor issues. I've replaced the door lock actuators on the front and rear driver side doors - $56 repair each door, had the A/C clutch coil replaced - $150 repair, A/C fan switch diode replaced - $75 repair, both electric cooling fans replaced - $500, and lastly the A/C condenser replaced, our biggest repair bill - $800. Other than those repairs, we've had very good overall reliability. Given I've spent less than $1,700 in repairs in 200k miles, I'd say the old CR-V has done well. I do change the fluids per Honda recommendations, and of course there is brakes and tires but all in all, I hope the reliability of the 2017 CR-V will be as good as our 2004. Looking back, most of our problems have been A/C system related which I think has been everyone's biggest complaint with the Gen 2 CR-V's.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Really, the total repair costs for my Passat weren't bad, especially since I did most of the work myself. The biggest repair was a wheel bearing, which went out just before a big trip, which means I didn't have time to do it myself; that set me back $500. Beyond that, an alternator ($150), CV boots ($300 for both axles), a set of coil packs ($120), valve cover gasket and PCV parts to fix an oil leak ($40), turn signal stalk ($70), trunk actuator ($80), control arms ($200), some misc. hoses, coolant flange (only $300, installed, which was crazy-cheap considering how painful that job is.) I think that was it, except for what I think anybody would consider wear parts. (Batteries, fluids, belts, shocks, etc.)

It only once stranded my wife, and never stranded me. It just went because it was getting annoying and worn out. Maybe it won't make the world's most reliable car for whomever picks it up, but I think it had a few years left.
 

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Interesting, it sounds as though our repair bills really aren't that far off, the A/C work I didn't do myself, just the smaller stuff along with the routine maintenance. If I was able to do a few of the bigger jobs myself I could have saved myself half the cost of those bills but I do not have the equipment to do A/C work.

I've had friends with VW's that had nightmare repair bills but I guess that could happen with any brand. Compared to even 20 years ago, I think the reliability of all brands have improved and are probably closer to one another than one might think.
 

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It's nice to be recognized! Yes, I'm the same SirWired with over 5k posts on PassatWorld.

Really, the age of the wagon is over. I looked at the SportWagen, but VW's current difficulties in the US, combined with VW shifting the safety gadget package in '17 to "factory order only" (translation: "Available only in theory") took it out of the running. (I'd have a '16 with the safety package in my driveway now if not for an idiot dealer in NJ who couldn't understand the concept of negotiation a purchase over e-mail.)

Pluses:
- My 165k '04 wagon had devloped all manner of rattles and they were driving me nuts. Sagging door cards, and the one-thing-after-another need for repairs was getting aggrevating. Coil packs one month, split vac lines the next, the need to spend some quality time with the suspension, all the "soft touch" surfaces in the cabin being destroyed, etc. In the home of an enthusiast, I'm sure Hans will serve well, but I just don't have the time or the inclination to fix all that.
- I went from a car built on a platform that is 20 years old to something more modern, and all that implies. Advances in transmissions mean I can accept a modern two-pedal car that has none of the drawbacks that led me to choose an M/T thirteen years ago.
- The tech. Oh, lord, the tech. Other than selecting a car with manual climate control, I got the advanced version, with the Stability Program package. (You would not BELIEVE how hard that made my search for a car... only $300, and it was near-impossible to find. Now that I think about it, similar to what VW is doing to the latest safety package now.) The "self-drive" features are a revelation. If you deal with traffic AT ALL, the adaptive cruise with low-speed follow is worth it's weight in gold. And Android Auto / CarPlay is wonderful (if for no other reason than you get free navi.)
- Reliability. No way to predict the future with 100% certainty, but it's not expected that I'll have to monitor forums like a hawk to know the ins-and-outs for keeping the car running a long time. I did a quite a bit of research and preventive maint. to keep the B5.5 going as long as I did. My wife's Solara? I log onto a forum maybe once a year; it doesn't need the "care and feeding" that the B5 did.
- Comfort. Besides the auto climate control, Honda's done a really good job with the seats. They are THAT good.

Cons:
- It's hard to describe, but you know that feeling you got when you first took a new B5.5 out for a test drive? That "thing" that seems to be unique to factory-fresh German cars? Yeah, the CR-V doesn't have it. It handles well enough, but not with that feeling of being "one with the machine". The same thing extends to the rest of the car; the buttons and controls (VW even explicitly states they have corporate standards for things like buttons, dials, switches, latches, etc., so they all feel the same), the ergonomics, etc. I definitely get the feeling in the CR-V that I'm in the car, not part of the car. I guess it's the difference between flying first class, and flying from the pilot's seat. There's pluses and minuses to each experience.

- Handling: The CR-V isn't sloppy or floaty, but it's no German Driving Machine. Really, it's very "Honda-like" in how it handles; seems very similar to how I remember my wife's long-ago '98 Accord. It's a deliberate decision they've made, and only you can decide if it'll work for you.

As far as practicality goes; other than the lack of factory roof rails (unless you get the touring), they are about the same. Both have cavernous cargo space. The CR-V has a much more expansive back seat. Both are reasonably thrifty with fuel, though the CR-V can swill regular.

Really, the B5.5 was ahead of it's time. Only with this latest generation of vehicles, over 15 years after the B5.5 wagon was released, are modern CUV's equalling those long-gone family haulers. Only now can you get something with approximate handling, cargo space, fuel efficiency, etc. (Which is a shame, really, I can only imagine what a modern station wagon would be like... no carmaker will bring them here. There are lots of wagons offered around the globe, and the US doesn't get them.)

On NVH: I'd say, net, they are about the same. The CR-V has less road noise, but during acceleration, is a little more "sharp" and "raspy". I don't know what VW did to the 1.8T to make it so muffled, but I've never seen it's equal. I don't think the CR-V is actually noisier, but the sounds "charachter" is different.

Hope this long bit of rambling helps...
Lol I'm laughing because I came from a mkiv GTI 1.8t. Everything you said is true. They were ahead of their time back in 2002 when I bought mine. The NVH at the time was unrivaled in the class. Interior the same. But problem after problem and constantly having to monitor the forums to get ahead or fix them.

Now i'm (wife) in a CRV (2015). Don't think I'll have to monitor the forum all that much. What a change, still a bad habit though.

A bit off topic but I had to reply. Enjoy the new rides everyone!

Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk
 

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Interesting to see so many former Passat Wagon drivers here. I had a 1999, but when the suspension was going to need another few thousand dollars, and the AC died, another $1500, plus all the dips in the roads that flooded every time it rained, I quickly needed a new car in 2007 and went for a Toyota Highlander. That was a a pretty good vehicle, but the gas mileage was rather terrible, and I had a brake issue that Toyota Regional said was "within spec" but was extremely dangerous (if I didn't pump while braking going downhill, the pedal would be on the floor when I needed to come to a full stop... and couldn't!). I'm very happy with my 2017 CR-V AWD Touring. No, the door doesn't give quite as satisfactory a "clunk" when closed, and it doesn't feel like it's on rails while driving, the way the Passat did for the first few years, but compared to the Highlander the steering and ride are great, and the safety features are wonderful.
 
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