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2018 CRV Touring AWD
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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I would normally replace a battery on general principles before the start of it's third winter season.
But I'm not sure if I should continue to do this with the hybrid, as the 12-volt battery doesn't crank the car.
It will be a while before we have accurate long-term info on how long those 12-volt hybrid batteries last.
You could test your battery of course, but it could go bad on the way home.
I figure a new battery every 3 years is cheap insurance.
 

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2013 EX
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I am not the CRV expert...but I wouldn't change out the battery until I had some indication that it was nearing end of life.

Edit: But there is usually not much cold weather where i live ...and there are at least a dozen places to get a battery within 10 minutes of where i live.
 

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The. Mod. Erator.
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I have not had any battery problems
And why wait till said problems arrive? :)

Threads galore in the 5G section about CR-V batteries going awry/dead at the 3 year mark. Prevention is better than cure 👌

but I wouldn't change out the battery until I had some indication that it was nearing end of life.
Sorry, but thats simply awful advice for the reasons noted above.
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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I am not the CRV expert...but I wouldn't change out the battery until I had some indication that it was nearing end of life.
Being three years old is an "indication that it's nearing end of life". :)
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
Definitely yes. I have a 2018 EXL, it has 17,000 miles. I faithfully used a battery tender when not going to be driven a while. I checked the water. My wife drove it about 250 miles to visit our daughter. Parked at her house and when she went to head to the motel in the evening the battery was completely dead. Luckily it was about 2 blocks from a Les Schwab tire and battery center and they delivered a new battery. As a side note, all the warning lights were still on when the new battery was put in. Luckily after driving about 15 minutes the lights went off. I felt frustrated not being there to help her. I've since ordered a lithium jumper pack to keep in the car. I'm glad she wasn't somewhere else when the battery died.
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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As a side note, all the warning lights were still on when the new battery was put in. Luckily after driving about 15 minutes the lights went off.
That's what's been reported by multiple people here with bad batteries, at about that age.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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As vehicles become more and more sophisticated regards voltage needs, the life of batteries seems to have diminished. (Part of this is due to the ever-smaller batteries fitted to new cars of all makes. Less weight = better MPG.) There are several "better Bigger Battery" topics here)

Many owners of our mid-2000s minivan change their batteries every 5 years just as Good Practice. Gen5 owners often do it at three years.

But, if you are good about checking battery electrolyte, you can usually achieve longer life. If you are nervous, the Lithium jumper pack is good for peace-of-mind.
 
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Okay..well....I checked ours. The wife's crv (2011) had battery replaced in June of 2019. And mine (2013) has s sticker on it that says 09/2019, so- they are both about 2 years old.
Now...IF I can remember....I'll pay attention to this and watch them over the next year or so.
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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Yes.....have one in each car, along with an air compressor. And each month I check tire pressure- spare- fluids- and power lever of jumper pack.
Good idea to check the charge level. Most of those starters use lithium polymer batteries, so they will lose power over time.
I'm actually investigating an aircraft battery. Not that it would last longer, but it would be less likely to fail unexpectedly.
Probably too costly, but I'm looking into it.
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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There are two pathways of "best practice" available here.

1) if you are in the ignore the battery until it dies crowd, then it would be prudent to replace your battery every 3 years if it is a 51R. The newer H5 batteries in the 1.5T 2020/2021s should be good for more like 4+ years with this approach (it is an Enhanced Flooded Cell battery with plenty of spare reserve charge for a 1.5T).

Even then, best have a lithium jump pack or jumper cables in your vehicle, because batteries can and do die early due to plate defects or evaporation of the electrolyte.

2) if you are in the routine maintain and monitor approach with your battery, then you check it periodically with a proper load test and only replace it once the CCA readout during a test shows the CCA to be less than 50% of spec. Note: most modern batteries when new will actually test at ~ 120% of spec.

With approach number one, you are being proactive in replacing early to avoid surprises when you go to start your vehicle.

With approach number two, you always know the quality of health of your battery and as such.... it can't sneak up on you with a dead start incident.

Which approach you choose depends on your personal preference. I prefer approach number 2, and you know what.. my little 51R is now 4.5 years old and still tests at greater than 100% on CCA, and passes all other load tests as well. But I also check and maintain electrolyte, connections, do periodic overnight saturation charges with a smart charger/maintainer, and I keep the top of the battery spotless clean as any small amount of electrolyte that leaks out onto the top of the battery (most often from rough road conditions and bouncing around, speed bumps at speed, etc) is a parasitic drain pathway that can and will cause premature discharge of your battery.

For the hybrids, they don't have a starter battery. Instead they have a "running battery" that powers all the electronic systems, and is charged via the HV systems in the vehicle. I think the vote is still out on how long that running battery will live.... but I would suggest that since Accords use similar systems and has been on the market longer as a hybrid... I would check and see what hybrid Accord users are reporting on how long their running battery lasts.
 

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these things will give you an idea of what the overall health of your battery has. The load tester is more of a direct measurement, while the conductance tester is more of an indirect test. The conductance tester does give you a CCA number to compare to the sticker on the battery label. Plus it doesn’t get hot like a load tester and they will also give you a poor mans alternator and starter test.

I usually check our batteries once a year. If the CCA drops below 80%, one of our jump packs go in the vehicle and the battery undergoes a reconditionin/desulfation. If I ever get a hard start or no start combined with a low reading then the battery gets at attempt at reconditioning/desulfation, but I usually don't hesitate to get it replaced.

I find that our batteries usually go between 4-5 years.
 
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I usually check our batteries once a year. If the CCA drops below 80%, one of our jump packs go in the vehicle and the battery undergoes a reconditionin/desulfation. If I ever get a hard start or no start combined with a low reading then the battery gets at attempt at reconditioning/desulfation, but I usually don't hesitate to get it replaced.

I find that our batteries usually go between 4-5 years.
Seems reasonable, if you have a mild climate.
Sub-zero temps and cranking a cold engine don't improve battery life though, so I tend to not ask them to go through a third winter. Probably too conservative, but that's OK with me.
But the jury's out on the hybrid 12-volt battery.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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If you have a cheap VOM meter, you can get an idea of battery health by checking it periodically (after a night's 'rest', before starting)


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Super Cheap at Costco For a Interstate 51r, only around $80 and very easy to change. Better than stock. If you live in a hot climate like So Cal, 3 years is aboout it. Nor Cal can probably go 5 years
 

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Okay..well....I checked ours. The wife's crv (2011) had battery replaced in June of 2019. And mine (2013) has s sticker on it that says 09/2019, so- they are both about 2 years old.
Now...IF I can remember....I'll pay attention to this and watch them over the next year or so.
Keep in mind that your 2011 and 2013 Vs don't have as much parasitic draw as the Gen 5 Vs do. I am not familiar with the capacity of the stock (or your replacement) batteries, when compared to the Gen 5, at least the 2017-2019 model years. Starting in 2020, the NON hybrid Vs have a better quality and capacity stock battery. I don't remember reading about a bunch of owners with a 2020+ having a battery fail, but they are not 3 years old yet.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I am here to find the answer ;) same question as yours I wanna ask
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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I am here to find the answer ;) same question as yours I wanna ask
Welcome to the forum @max1025.
As you can see lots of folks are interested in this topic.
As they say, stay tuned.
 
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