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There are two pathways of "best practice" available here.

1) if you are in the ignore the battery until it dies crowd, then it would be prudent to replace your battery every 3 years if it is a 51R. The newer H5 batteries in the 1.5T 2020/2021s should be good for more like 4+ years with this approach (it is an Enhanced Flooded Cell battery with plenty of spare reserve charge for a 1.5T).

Even then, best have a lithium jump pack or jumper cables in your vehicle, because batteries can and do die early due to plate defects or evaporation of the electrolyte.

2) if you are in the routine maintain and monitor approach with your battery, then you check it periodically with a proper load test and only replace it once the CCA readout during a test shows the CCA to be less than 50% of spec. Note: most modern batteries when new will actually test at ~ 120% of spec.

With approach number one, you are being proactive in replacing early to avoid surprises when you go to start your vehicle.

With approach number two, you always know the quality of health of your battery and as such.... it can't sneak up on you with a dead start incident.

Which approach you choose depends on your personal preference. I prefer approach number 2, and you know what.. my little 51R is now 4.5 years old and still tests at greater than 100% on CCA, and passes all other load tests as well. But I also check and maintain electrolyte, connections, do periodic overnight saturation charges with a smart charger/maintainer, and I keep the top of the battery spotless clean as any small amount of electrolyte that leaks out onto the top of the battery (most often from rough road conditions and bouncing around, speed bumps at speed, etc) is a parasitic drain pathway that can and will cause premature discharge of your battery.

For the hybrids, they don't have a starter battery. Instead they have a "running battery" that powers all the electronic systems, and is charged via the HV systems in the vehicle. I think the vote is still out on how long that running battery will live.... but I would suggest that since Accords use similar systems and has been on the market longer as a hybrid... I would check and see what hybrid Accord users are reporting on how long their running battery lasts.
 

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Is your opion that batterys are better or worse today than they were 10-15 years ago?
I actually believe that batteries are better than 10-15 years ago, just due to consolidation in the industry under very large corporations (which brings scalability and improved manufacturing processes), and the fact that automation in manufacturing benefits devices like vehicle starter batteries.

BUT..... two things to understand:

1) we as consumers have been lead down the path of thinking all starter batteries are "maintenance free" when in reality a majority of batteries in use continue to be flooded cell designs, and they do slowly loose water from the electrolyte over time. You will get longer life from a battery (similar to the "old days") if you maintain them well. Keep in mind.. this is not an electrical or mechanical device.. it is a chemical device, and all the various challenges of environment and chemistry come into play. A battery literally begins destroying itself as soon as it is loaded with electrolyte, and the only clear mitigation of this is to keep it fully charged and the electrolyte at full capacity. A low charge state (even 90%) begins to accelerate the chemical destruction of the plates in the battery, and Hondas are very often below full charge when you park and turn them off (due to the way the dual charge modes work on the charger).

Bottom line... maintain your battery for maximum life span and you will get life spans comparable to 10 years ago.

2) The demand from modern motor vehicles on their starter batteries is much harder on the batteries. Not in terms of engine start, but rather all the various electronics in modern vehicles, all of which draw a small amount of current even when powered down. So.. a decade ago.. typical parasitic drain on a battery was 5-10 ma. Today, on a current model Honda with a 1.5T engine.... the normal parasitic drain is ~40-50 ma.... and yet until recently Honda continued it's long practice of using the 51R battery (for cost, weight, and compact sizing). As of 2018 on the Accords and 2020 on the CRVs... they are equipped with a battery much better suited for the parasitic load demands.

So, at the end of the day, given most owners ignore their battery until it fails..... the net effect in the industry is what appears to be shorter overall average battery life. On average, the electrolyte will completely dry up in one or more cells in a flooded cell battery if it is never checked and topped up... and that can happen as quickly as a year, or can take several years, depending on ambient driving conditions.

I do believe you can in most cases get 6+ years out of a 51R in a generation5 CRV, if the battery is properly monitored and maintained, and I am currently running my 2017 as a test case demonstration. Heading for 5 years now, and still tested last week as good, and with a CCA still running at 115% of spec. This battery has actually gotten slightly better over time, probably due to the long slow saturation charges and maintaining of charge during the pandemic with my NOCO5.
 

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Will the H5 fit in the 2017? Or just get a 51R? My '17 will be heading into its 5th winter in a few months (Chicago area). Maybe I should swap it this fall. But battery check 3 weeks ago during oil change indicated it was fine.
I believe the H5s are almost identical in physical dimensions to the popular 51R replacement by members here who choose to upsize in the past "Group24 battery group".

And clearly, they will fit, because they are being installed in 2020 and 2021 CRVs. But as with the group24, it is likely you may need a new battery tray and hold down hardware is all. Upgrading the mounting is pretty easy and inexpensive to do if you want to upgrade battery size. You can find threads in the forum here discussing the steps to upsize to a group 24, and an H5 would be equally simple. I would recommend the H5 over the Group24 as the H5s used an advanced plate technology and are classified as Enhanced Flooded Cell Batter (EFB) batteries.

Personally, I am fine with a 51R in my CRV, and it is doing great. But I also nurture the starter batteries in our vehicles, which does make a difference. If I was a "forget it until it fails" owner.. I would definitely upsize to an H5 or Group24. (y)
 

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I noted the size difference on the Interstate Battery site. They appear to be quite different sizes, especially HEIGHT.

H5:

51R:

Hopefully, someone with a 2017 and a 2020+ will post pictures to see how the two different batteries are mounted.
The difference in CCA is 40 CCA.
Just to note: That particular 51R from Interstate has a higher CCA spec than the more common after markets and OEMs. There appear to be two tiers of 51Rs in the market, with one being a 450ish CCA, and the other tier being a 500ish CCA.

I noted this because if an owner wanted to stick with a 51R for simplicity, definitely shop for a higher tier 51R that is spec'ed similar to the Interstate battery in the link above.
 

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Different beast entirely Fishy, compared to what is used in the current generation iMMD Honda hybrids.

I'm sure when the day comes, and some do need to be replaced, they will be over priced and will mostly be remanufactured units... but no way the small packs in the iMMDs should cost $3500. But I bet they still pencil out at around $1500... plus in some stated a recycling surcharge.
 

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Most people need to replace their phone batteries (which are lithium) around the 3-year mark, and they are not baking in a hot car most of the time.
This is a poor comparison between a Lithium jump pack and a phone battery. Phone batteries need to be replaced after a few years because they have simply been recharged to death. Every charge cycle on a lithium battery takes a tiny bit of life and capacity off of the battery, and most phone owners charge their phones every day. Fact is.. phone batteries typically last way beyond their rated charge life-cycle (which is 300-400 charge cycles).

For anyone using a lithium jumpstart pack, you should be aware that lithium batteries degrade over time, especially when stored in extremely hot conditions (like in a hot vehicle). It's likely they will degrade faster than the lead acid battery under the hood (the main difference being that the lithium battery is probably not being subjected to constant parasitic discharge).
Modern lithium batteries are very temperature stable. In addition, they have sensors in them and will refuse to issue power if they are above a threshold temperature. Fact is.. lithium batteries get quite warm internally when being charged, yet as we can see... in daily phone use.... yet they last 2 to 3 times longer than the rated number of charge cycles.

A jump pack will never see ambient temperatures, nor charging cycles that would drive them to early or premature death.

I have gone with a super capacitor jump start pack myself (which I have not yet had to use), however I think those are a better long-term purchase than a lithium one.
Nothing wrong with these capacitor packs, if they work.

I personally would no use one though as a well designed lithium pack is a superior choice and has other features and functions typically that allow it to be used as a charging bank for USB devices, as well as other features.

That said... not all lithium packs are specified alike... and if you want to jump a truly dead battery... you will need one with a manual over-ride feature that allows the user to jump a 0vdc starter battery as many of them will not jump a starter battery that is below 8vdc.
 

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I have a 2017 CR-V and my original battery lasted two years and five months when I replaced it with an Optima Yellow Top D51R. Typically it’s expensive to start replacing things like batteries before they go bad, but that is completely your decision. Batteries have so many factors that determine their lifespan. What I would recommend to ease your mind is to have a portable battery jump starter with you at all times and, that way, when your battery does go bad, you can use that to get you where you need to be to get a replacement. I use the Noco boost GB40.

NOCO Boost Plus GB40 1000 Amp 12-Volt UltraSafe Lithium Jump Starter Box, Car Battery Booster Pack, Portable Power Bank Charger, and Jumper Cables For Up To 6-Liter Gasoline and 3-Liter Diesel Engines https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015TKUPI...abc_8XXKE7XKY7T3KBWF9NZ8?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
The NOCO GB40, like all NOCO devices I have owned.. is a top notch choice. (y)
 

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I would buy a small jump starter with a lithium-ion battery instead. They work very well and are great to have in the trunk anyway. They are not much larger than a VHS tape and can be bought for less than $50.
The NOCO he is referring to IS a lithium jump pack. NOCO makes chargers and they make power packs. :)

The NOCO jump packs by the way are superior to many on the market because they have the ability to jump a completely dead (0vdc) battery if needed. Most jump packs have no ability to jump a battery that is below 8vdc). NOCO is not the only brand with an over-ride feature (with safety protocols) to be able to jump a fully depleted battery, but this ability is one of the "fine print" features anyone buying a jump pack needs to be aware of.
 

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The load tester costs $75, the battery tester $50.
I don't know how much a tow truck outfit charges to come out and give you a jump. $50?
A new Walmart Everstart Maxx battery costs $100. You are going to have to buy a new battery anyway in 3-4 years, so why spend as much or more for the testers to squeeze another year or so out of it?
Having a low cost load tester or a low cost battery tester at home.... means you are more likely to check and maintain your vehicles battery ... make that vehicles (plural as you can use these two pieces for many years and many vehicles)... AND you will know from periodic checks loooonnnng before your battery ever reaches a condition that would mean calling for a service to come jump your vehicle for you. Seriously, monthly checks of your battery with a home tester and you will see a dying battery coming many months in advance (the exception would be a sudden mechanical failure of the plates in one or more cells).

Chance favors the prepared mind... and where batteries ignored by owners are concerned... chance means dead batteries when you least expect or are tolerant of.... because you never saw it coming, because you never looked. :)
 

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I agree, though most are lithium polymer, and so will lose some charge with time.
Concern about lithium batteries used in low duty cycle devices like jump packs is waaaayyy over stressed/worried by owners.

Fact is even a poor lithium battery design will still go over 100 charging cycles before seeing any notable (functional) degradation in capacity. And most jump packs have way more capacity than is required by a CRV to jump start it.

I have charged my jump packs for our two vehicles..... roughly half a dozen times to date, as they have yet to be used and they hold a strong stored charge for months. The ones I have, self discharge at the rate of ~ 5% per month, which is pretty normal given the jump packs have some parasitic drain in them in addition to battery self-discharge.

The real hazard with jump packs is owners who buy them, put them in their trunk after the first charge, and literally never go back and ever check and top them up.. and when they need them.. they are dead or severely disharged. :) This by the way can be eliminated by either including a check&charge during routine monthly starter battery check and test... OR.... simply plug the jump pack into your 12v accessory outlet and leave it hooked up so that it gets topped up when you drive. But doing this will mean the pack will probably age out at around 5-7 years and need to be replaced.
 

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My 2018 CRV is a few months shy of three (3) years old. Went to start it a few days ago, and had every warning light go on - bells and buzzers alarming, and then click - car would not start. Long story short, put new battery in, and car started fine and has been OK since then. Battery was OEM Honda. The next day, I checked voltage on the old battery - 11.90 VDC - more importantly - there was little-to-no water in cells. I know I should have been more diligent in car maintenance. We've experienced a very hot summer and the CR-V tends to run very warm. Would appreciate some input- does the vehicle need checked over by Honda - or is this a dead or poor condition battery issue? thank you. (the vehicle has 41,000 miles).
Clearly the old battery was nearly depleted and if your charging system is functioning normally... then the battery simply can't hold a charge. It could be if you topped up the electrolyte it could be fully recharged, but I would not do that as I am positive there is serious plate damage in the old battery due to persistently low electrolyte levels coupled with low charge levels.

Basically, you found the cause, swapped the cause out with a replacement and everything is back to normal. But if you want a bit of extra piece of mind.. get your charging system (and the new battery) properly tested just to be sure you do not have a charging issue (which based on what you shared, it's the battery, nothing else). You can do that at home with a low cost consumer battery and charger testing unit, or you can visit a local autoparts store as most of them are happy to test and check your battery and charging system at no charge. Beyond that, as long as your CRV clears all it's alerts normally after a 10 or 15 minute drive.. you are good to go. (y)
 

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Some cars (no Honda that I know of) include a battery insulation “blanket “ around it in the engine bay.
Well, Honda does put insulating jackets around their OEM batteries at the factory when they install them. Between the bottom plastic tray and the jacket.. only the top of the battery is exposed to ambient temperatures directly.
 
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