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2017 CR-V EX-L w/ NAV
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I personally think today's batteries are designed to last shorter than previous ones. Yes I know about parasitic drain and that is a thing. I replaced mine at 4 yrs exactly from date of purchase and it was showing no signs of failure. I succumbed to pressure from this forum and I know I could have waited but what the heck, gave me an excuse to get out during pandemic. I also put in an AGM battery. Short answer is do what YOU think is best for YOU.
 

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Oh I can not wait for those HY brid cars batteries to be replaced. and the price it cost.

recycles imagine all those short runs
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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Oh I can not wait for those HY brid cars batteries to be replaced. and the price it cost.

recycles imagine all those short runs
Do you mean the 12-volt battery or the "High Voltage" battery?
The HV battery is not that large, it only holds about 15 cents worth of electricity.
But it's warrantied for 8 years.
The 12-volt battery is no more expensive that any car battery would be.
 

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Like said
Automotive tire Toy Automotive design Vehicle Automotive wheel system
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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Different beast entirely Fishy, compared to what is used in the current generation iMMD Honda hybrids.

I'm sure when the day comes, and some do need to be replaced, they will be over priced and will mostly be remanufactured units... but no way the small packs in the iMMDs should cost $3500. But I bet they still pencil out at around $1500... plus in some stated a recycling surcharge.
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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Different beast entirely Fishy, compared to what is used in the current generation iMMD Honda hybrids.

I'm sure when the day comes, and some do need to be replaced, they will be over priced and will mostly be remanufactured units... but no way the small packs in the iMMDs should cost $3500. But I bet they still pencil out at around $1500... plus in some stated a recycling surcharge.
Poking around the internet for a 1.5 kwh. lithium battery they now run about $1500, so you are correct, as of now.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I would replace it now. I too have a 2018 Touring and at just over 2 yrs, the battery died. No issues prior to it dying. Got up one morning to go to work and there was not enough juice to start the car. Save yourself the inconvenience of having to buy a new one when it’s least expected. Preventative maintenance is key.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
So modern day batteries pretty much stink on ice. None of them last particularly long and if you’re subjecting them to cold or, in my neck of the woods, substantial heat over long periods of time they don't last. Therefore it comes down to how risk-averse you are. Would you rather replace it every three years and never have to worry about it at all (unless you get a bad one) or wait for an indication that there’s a problem and then replace it. For the most part because I have my cars regularly serviced I wait until the first sign of trouble and then I replace the battery. However I also carry and all of my family members carry a small jumpstart pack which is a rechargeable battery that has just enough juice to turn you over and get you out of trouble if you need it. They usually have lights on them and they’ll charge your cell phone to.
 

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For anyone using a lithium jumpstart pack, you should be aware that lithium batteries degrade over time, especially when stored in extremely hot conditions (like in a hot vehicle). It's likely they will degrade faster than the lead acid battery under the hood (the main difference being that the lithium battery is probably not being subjected to constant parasitic discharge). Most people need to replace their phone batteries (which are lithium) around the 3-year mark, and they are not baking in a hot car most of the time.

I have gone with a super capacitor jump start pack myself (which I have not yet had to use), however I think those are a better long-term purchase than a lithium one.
 

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Changing the battery every 3 years (or sooner) "just because" is like changing the oil every 5,000 miles "just because."
 

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2018 CRV EX L
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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I have a 2018 CRV and replaced mine about 6 months ago. Walmart had a great deal on batteries. Don't forget to put a memory minder on your CRV BEFORE you disconnect your old battery! You don't want to lose your cars data.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I have a 2017 CR-V and my original battery lasted two years and five months when I replaced it with an Optima Yellow Top D51R. Typically it’s expensive to start replacing things like batteries before they go bad, but that is completely your decision. Batteries have so many factors that determine their lifespan. What I would recommend to ease your mind is to have a portable battery jump starter with you at all times and, that way, when your battery does go bad, you can use that to get you where you need to be to get a replacement. I use the Noco boost GB40.

NOCO Boost Plus GB40 1000 Amp 12-Volt UltraSafe Lithium Jump Starter Box, Car Battery Booster Pack, Portable Power Bank Charger, and Jumper Cables For Up To 6-Liter Gasoline and 3-Liter Diesel Engines https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015TKUPI...abc_8XXKE7XKY7T3KBWF9NZ8?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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Most people need to replace their phone batteries (which are lithium) around the 3-year mark, and they are not baking in a hot car most of the time.
This is a poor comparison between a Lithium jump pack and a phone battery. Phone batteries need to be replaced after a few years because they have simply been recharged to death. Every charge cycle on a lithium battery takes a tiny bit of life and capacity off of the battery, and most phone owners charge their phones every day. Fact is.. phone batteries typically last way beyond their rated charge life-cycle (which is 300-400 charge cycles).

For anyone using a lithium jumpstart pack, you should be aware that lithium batteries degrade over time, especially when stored in extremely hot conditions (like in a hot vehicle). It's likely they will degrade faster than the lead acid battery under the hood (the main difference being that the lithium battery is probably not being subjected to constant parasitic discharge).
Modern lithium batteries are very temperature stable. In addition, they have sensors in them and will refuse to issue power if they are above a threshold temperature. Fact is.. lithium batteries get quite warm internally when being charged, yet as we can see... in daily phone use.... yet they last 2 to 3 times longer than the rated number of charge cycles.

A jump pack will never see ambient temperatures, nor charging cycles that would drive them to early or premature death.

I have gone with a super capacitor jump start pack myself (which I have not yet had to use), however I think those are a better long-term purchase than a lithium one.
Nothing wrong with these capacitor packs, if they work.

I personally would no use one though as a well designed lithium pack is a superior choice and has other features and functions typically that allow it to be used as a charging bank for USB devices, as well as other features.

That said... not all lithium packs are specified alike... and if you want to jump a truly dead battery... you will need one with a manual over-ride feature that allows the user to jump a 0vdc starter battery as many of them will not jump a starter battery that is below 8vdc.
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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I have a 2017 CR-V and my original battery lasted two years and five months when I replaced it with an Optima Yellow Top D51R. Typically it’s expensive to start replacing things like batteries before they go bad, but that is completely your decision. Batteries have so many factors that determine their lifespan. What I would recommend to ease your mind is to have a portable battery jump starter with you at all times and, that way, when your battery does go bad, you can use that to get you where you need to be to get a replacement. I use the Noco boost GB40.

NOCO Boost Plus GB40 1000 Amp 12-Volt UltraSafe Lithium Jump Starter Box, Car Battery Booster Pack, Portable Power Bank Charger, and Jumper Cables For Up To 6-Liter Gasoline and 3-Liter Diesel Engines https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015TKUPI...abc_8XXKE7XKY7T3KBWF9NZ8?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
The NOCO GB40, like all NOCO devices I have owned.. is a top notch choice. (y)
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I have a 2017 crv touring that I acquired on 12/16/16. I have just changed mine in August 2021. It would be 5 years(60 months) on 12/2021. Most batteries on Honda are 60 month life cycles. Mine was still strong when I changed it, but I rather change it in the summer than have a issue in the winter. If your doing it yourself remember to have a backup voltage source on your battery cables when you remove them so you don’t lose any memory on your system computer.
 

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2017 CRV EX-L Turbo with Nav. The VEHICLE has been bullet proof with only a broken gearshift knob early on (Manufacturing defect--replaced at no cost) & a $155 replacement cost for a fuse (fusible link?) that was Caused By a BATTERY issue. The BATTERIES have been anything But bullet proof with taking 3 batteries to get one that worked for a length of time. The other 2 stranded me 3 times with NO warning. 100 month warranty on the Honda battery--just a marketing ploy to keep people locked into buying Honda batteries.

This month I was thinking it was about time to consider replacing the battery to be safe because it was about 2-1/2 years old when the MM service on the vehicle found battery cranking power down about 20%. I had, had no problems with this battery but decided to replace it for peace of mind; although having gone through 3 Honda batteries I am not sure any Honda battery will give me peace of mind.

The batteries on all of the other cars which I have owned would have given me a warning in time to replace them without being stranded. Never been stranded by a failed battery in any other vehicle. The Honda batteries--no warning, you go to the restaurant or to the house & when you come out the CRV won't start--that is the good part; the bad part is that it won't start & it causes all types of other problems & flashing lights so that it takes them days to determine that the real problem is the battery.

At the very least have the battery tested but at 3 years, replacing the battery might be a better option for some degree of peace of mind & to avoid being stranded without warning.
 

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2018 CRV Touring AWD
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
2017 CRV EX-L Turbo with Nav. The VEHICLE has been bullet proof with only a broken gearshift knob early on (Manufacturing defect--replaced at no cost) & a $155 replacement cost for a fuse (fusible link?) that was Caused By a BATTERY issue. The BATTERIES have been anything But bullet proof with taking 3 batteries to get one that worked for a length of time. The other 2 stranded me 3 times with NO warning. 100 month warranty on the Honda battery--just a marketing ploy to keep people locked into buying Honda batteries.

This month I was thinking it was about time to consider replacing the battery to be safe because it was about 2-1/2 years old when the MM service on the vehicle found battery cranking power down about 20%. I had, had no problems with this battery but decided to replace it for peace of mind; although having gone through 3 Honda batteries I am not sure any Honda battery will give me peace of mind.

The batteries on all of the other cars which I have owned would have given me a warning in time to replace them without being stranded. Never been stranded by a failed battery in any other vehicle. The Honda batteries--no warning, you go to the restaurant or to the house & when you come out the CRV won't start--that is the good part; the bad part is that it won't start & it causes all types of other problems & flashing lights so that it takes them days to determine that the real problem is the battery.

At the very least have the battery tested but at 3 years, replacing the battery might be a better option for some degree of peace of mind & to avoid being stranded without warning.
Agree ! I went and had a new battery placed the same day I posted my concern. Next purchase will be a battery power pack, probably a NOCO, for additional peace of mind. Have a good evening.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I would buy a small jump starter with a lithium-ion battery instead. They work very well and are great to have in the trunk anyway. They are not much larger than a VHS tape and can be bought for less than $50.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I have a 2018 CRV touring also, back in July my battery died, no warning! I say replace it and, then you don’t have to worry about it!






I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
I have the same exact vehicle, which I love. 2018 CRV touring. With no warning my battery died back in July. I replaced it with a Duracell Gold battery. 👍🏾
 

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I would normally replace a battery on general principles before the start of it's third winter season.
But I'm not sure if I should continue to do this with the hybrid, as the 12-volt battery doesn't crank the car.
It will be a while before we have accurate long-term info on how long those 12-volt hybrid batteries last.
You could test your battery of course, but it could go bad on the way home.
I figure a new battery every 3 years is cheap insurance.
I spent 18 years in tires and the auto service field. Three years is about all you are going to get out of a battery. Why chance it? Unless your cheap like me, lol!
 
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