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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
If you are within 36,000 miles, the dealership changed my battery for free. But factory battery had died once - and I had experienced two winters with original battery.
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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I would buy a small jump starter with a lithium-ion battery instead. They work very well and are great to have in the trunk anyway. They are not much larger than a VHS tape and can be bought for less than $50.
The NOCO he is referring to IS a lithium jump pack. NOCO makes chargers and they make power packs. :)

The NOCO jump packs by the way are superior to many on the market because they have the ability to jump a completely dead (0vdc) battery if needed. Most jump packs have no ability to jump a battery that is below 8vdc). NOCO is not the only brand with an over-ride feature (with safety protocols) to be able to jump a fully depleted battery, but this ability is one of the "fine print" features anyone buying a jump pack needs to be aware of.
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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The load tester costs $75, the battery tester $50.
I don't know how much a tow truck outfit charges to come out and give you a jump. $50?
A new Walmart Everstart Maxx battery costs $100. You are going to have to buy a new battery anyway in 3-4 years, so why spend as much or more for the testers to squeeze another year or so out of it?
Having a low cost load tester or a low cost battery tester at home.... means you are more likely to check and maintain your vehicles battery ... make that vehicles (plural as you can use these two pieces for many years and many vehicles)... AND you will know from periodic checks loooonnnng before your battery ever reaches a condition that would mean calling for a service to come jump your vehicle for you. Seriously, monthly checks of your battery with a home tester and you will see a dying battery coming many months in advance (the exception would be a sudden mechanical failure of the plates in one or more cells).

Chance favors the prepared mind... and where batteries ignored by owners are concerned... chance means dead batteries when you least expect or are tolerant of.... because you never saw it coming, because you never looked. :)
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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I agree, though most are lithium polymer, and so will lose some charge with time.
Concern about lithium batteries used in low duty cycle devices like jump packs is waaaayyy over stressed/worried by owners.

Fact is even a poor lithium battery design will still go over 100 charging cycles before seeing any notable (functional) degradation in capacity. And most jump packs have way more capacity than is required by a CRV to jump start it.

I have charged my jump packs for our two vehicles..... roughly half a dozen times to date, as they have yet to be used and they hold a strong stored charge for months. The ones I have, self discharge at the rate of ~ 5% per month, which is pretty normal given the jump packs have some parasitic drain in them in addition to battery self-discharge.

The real hazard with jump packs is owners who buy them, put them in their trunk after the first charge, and literally never go back and ever check and top them up.. and when they need them.. they are dead or severely disharged. :) This by the way can be eliminated by either including a check&charge during routine monthly starter battery check and test... OR.... simply plug the jump pack into your 12v accessory outlet and leave it hooked up so that it gets topped up when you drive. But doing this will mean the pack will probably age out at around 5-7 years and need to be replaced.
 

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My 2018 CRV is a few months shy of three (3) years old. Went to start it a few days ago, and had every warning light go on - bells and buzzers alarming, and then click - car would not start. Long story short, put new battery in, and car started fine and has been OK since then. Battery was OEM Honda. The next day, I checked voltage on the old battery - 11.90 VDC - more importantly - there was little-to-no water in cells. I know I should have been more diligent in car maintenance. We've experienced a very hot summer and the CR-V tends to run very warm. Would appreciate some input- does the vehicle need checked over by Honda - or is this a dead or poor condition battery issue? thank you. (the vehicle has 41,000 miles).
 

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My 2018 CRV is a few months shy of three (3) years old. Went to start it a few days ago, and had every warning light go on - bells and buzzers alarming, and then click - car would not start. Long story short, put new battery in, and car started fine and has been OK since then. Battery was OEM Honda. The next day, I checked voltage on the old battery - 11.90 VDC - more importantly - there was little-to-no water in cells. I know I should have been more diligent in car maintenance. We've experienced a very hot summer and the CR-V tends to run very warm. Would appreciate some input- does the vehicle need checked over by Honda - or is this a dead or poor condition battery issue? thank you. (the vehicle has 41,000 miles).
3 years is about the useful lifespan of a battery these days. Might have helped some to keep the water topped up, but sounds perfectly normal to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
Your posting says that you put in a new battery -- which was about the time to do so. I have a 2018 model and recently replaced my battery which was not giving me problems but elected to do so as preventative measures. Just keep an eye on the fluids in the battery like you do all your other fluid levels.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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And YES, if you had been more diligent about checking the electrolyte in the battery, you certainly would have gotten more life out of the old battery. No other issues to worry about...the dash indicators will go out after the electronics re-initialize.

<SOAP BOX>

Warm weather weakens lead-acid batteries (the electrolyte evaporates, especially with the electrical demands of A/C with the radiator and interior fans running). Then, the weak batteries fail when the ambient temperature drops.

Is there any wonder that MANY battery topics have been posted recently? you only need to look at the maps of fall foliage to predict where the battery Topics will begin. :p :)

<OFF SOAP BOX>>
 

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Bat got vent holes in front cover. due to the engine heat and temps, nothing to worry about, have fun
 

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And YES, if you had been more diligent about checking the electrolyte in the battery, you certainly would have gotten more life out of the old battery. No other issues to worry about...the dash indicators will go out after the electronics re-initialize.

<SOAP BOX>

Warm weather weakens lead-acid batteries (the electrolyte evaporates, especially with the electrical demands of A/C with the radiator and interior fans running). Then, the weak batteries fail when the ambient temperature drops.

Is there any wonder that MANY battery topics have been posted recently? you only need to look at the maps of fall foliage to predict where the battery Topics will begin. :p :)

<OFF SOAP BOX>>
I kept the electrolyte checked on mine and it went out in 3 1/2 years. You never know. Also my Honda dealer said they do not check battery fluid levels when they service your car. That is really sad.
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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My 2018 CRV is a few months shy of three (3) years old. Went to start it a few days ago, and had every warning light go on - bells and buzzers alarming, and then click - car would not start. Long story short, put new battery in, and car started fine and has been OK since then. Battery was OEM Honda. The next day, I checked voltage on the old battery - 11.90 VDC - more importantly - there was little-to-no water in cells. I know I should have been more diligent in car maintenance. We've experienced a very hot summer and the CR-V tends to run very warm. Would appreciate some input- does the vehicle need checked over by Honda - or is this a dead or poor condition battery issue? thank you. (the vehicle has 41,000 miles).
Clearly the old battery was nearly depleted and if your charging system is functioning normally... then the battery simply can't hold a charge. It could be if you topped up the electrolyte it could be fully recharged, but I would not do that as I am positive there is serious plate damage in the old battery due to persistently low electrolyte levels coupled with low charge levels.

Basically, you found the cause, swapped the cause out with a replacement and everything is back to normal. But if you want a bit of extra piece of mind.. get your charging system (and the new battery) properly tested just to be sure you do not have a charging issue (which based on what you shared, it's the battery, nothing else). You can do that at home with a low cost consumer battery and charger testing unit, or you can visit a local autoparts store as most of them are happy to test and check your battery and charging system at no charge. Beyond that, as long as your CRV clears all it's alerts normally after a 10 or 15 minute drive.. you are good to go. (y)
 

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My 2018 CRV is a few months shy of three (3) years old. Went to start it a few days ago, and had every warning light go on - bells and buzzers alarming, and then click - car would not start. Long story short, put new battery in, and car started fine and has been OK since then. Battery was OEM Honda. The next day, I checked voltage on the old battery - 11.90 VDC - more importantly - there was little-to-no water in cells. I know I should have been more diligent in car maintenance. We've experienced a very hot summer and the CR-V tends to run very warm. Would appreciate some input- does the vehicle need checked over by Honda - or is this a dead or poor condition battery issue? thank you. (the vehicle has 41,000 miles).
Exactly how warm is "very warm" when it's running on hot days?
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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Some cars (no Honda that I know of) include a battery insulation “blanket “ around it in the engine bay.
Well, Honda does put insulating jackets around their OEM batteries at the factory when they install them. Between the bottom plastic tray and the jacket.. only the top of the battery is exposed to ambient temperatures directly.
 

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I have the 2018 CRV Touring. The vehicle is 3 years old. Having read several posts regarding the life of the battery I am thinking about having the battery replaced, as preventative maintenance and a peace of mind. I have not had any battery problems and wondering if it is reasonable to swap out for a new one before I do have issues. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
There are a number of battery testers that work on a capacitance/conductive test method rather than the "old school" load test. While they don't put a heavy load on the battery, they seem to be fairly accurate in detecting a battery that's on it's "last leg" prior to not cranking the engine over anymore. I have one made by Solar that costs about $50; it allows you to test standard flooded wet cell auto batteries, gel cells, SLA, AGM spiral, etc. You specify the rating by CCA, DIN, etc. I found most batteries when new to be a lot higher than their rated capacity (ie. a 450 CCA battery will test at 525 CCA or higher when new) and once the battery tests below the rated CCA, it's degrading. Although a 450 CCA battery will indicate as "good" at 390 CCA, I would begin thinking about replacing it.

In the case of Honda branded OEM batteries, I would definitely use the above criteria because despite it saying "100-month warranty" on the battery label, I've rarely found them to last beyond 4 years in general; at least on my Fits they don't. On the other hand, my 2012 Fit has an Interstate MTP-151R which has a 5 year warranty on it and I'm already at 5-1/2 years and it's still working fine (my last test on it did show 350 CCA on a rated 370 CCA so it's going to fail soon but it's already lasted beyond the stated warranty period).

I would seriously think about replacing the battery soon as we're approaching the winter season and if it snows a lot where you live, you should do so before the first snowfall.
 
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